15

While some (including R' Vosner) are stringent, it is generally understood that to operate such cameras as well as walk past them is perfectly permitted. The difference between surveillance cameras and filming a function is that when filming for security purposes, you don't actually want anyone (other than intruders) to be filmed, hence, it is considered a '...


12

Now that the app is actually out and we can see what it does, the Tzomet institute has an article about it. In summary, they say it is forbidden. They take issue with the app's primary claim, which is that the app utilizes a time delay and calls this a grama. The Tzomet institute (which is a pioneer in the development of grama based devices and has some ...


10

According to the article posted here: The Shabbos App is completely unacceptable from a halachic standpoint, according to Rabbi Moshe Elefant of the Orthodox Union. ... Noted halachic authority Rabbi Yair Hoffman said that while the app could transform texting from an issur d’oraysa to an issur d’rabanon, it is still strictly forbidden and should be avoided ...


8

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Meoray Eish and Minchas Shlomo 14) sides that technically as far as the laws of Muktzah are concerned it is permitted. However in a footnote he writes "All what I have written is only a discussion and not to be relied on, for all of Israel refrained all these years from moving an electric light on Shabbos and it appears as uvdin ...


8

Not precisely as you say, but the Be'er Hagolah (OC 670:3) quotes the Beis Yosef who writes that the reason is in order that it should be a reminder for them that it is forbidden to use the light from the candles. ֽֽAs far as your bonus question, while it's quite difficult to prove a negative, but I haven't heard of any opinions that say such a thing. Also, ...


7

Apple’s default alarm behavior on iOS is to have the alarm go off indefinitely, so if one wants to use the iPhone or iPad alarm on Shabbat, one has to use a third-party app like this one that shuts the alarm off by itself. The only other thing I can think of to do with an iOS device on Shabbat is play media (like music) on a playlist, which would of course ...


7

The answer to Can one run a surveillance Camera on Shabbos? quotes Dose of Halacha as saying, with regards to being photographed by a surveillance camera: R’ Moshe Feinstein (in a letter to R’ Yisroel Rozen of the Tzomet Institute) wrote that as the data is not being permanently recorded, it is at worst a derabanan. Although the cameras operate for ...


7

This Star-K article by Rabbi Tzvi Rosen says: Although induction cooking offers a koshering benefit, the cooktop cannot be used on Shabbos or Yom Yov because the cooking connection is made once the pot is put onto the coil area. Similarly, one would not be able to remove the pot from the cooktop on Shabbos or Yom Tov because one would be “disconnecting” ...


6

I heard from a student of R. Yosef Dov Soloveitchik z"l that whether a translation of God's name into English or another language, has the status of a shem or not, replacing a letter with another symbol e.g. "G-d" accomplishes nothing, because there are no formal laws about the lettering of English as there are with Hebrew (e.g. regarding the laws of ...


6

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


6

Based on some research, e.g. this link, I would venture that the Chazzal, the Rishonim and even early Achronim never heard of it and rarely if ever experienced the zap of static electricity. About the only way to accidentally produce static electricity without synthetic materials is by rubbing silk on glass, or fur on copper. Since they didn't wear ...


6

I found this article that answers my question: R’ Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe OC 4:60) writes that one may only use timers on Shabbos for one’s lights. Firstly, timers are akin to instructing a non-Jew to perform a melacha on one’s behalf which is prohibited. Additionally, it isn’t respectful for Shabbos. As people always had non-Jews come in to their ...


6

Journal of Halacha & Contemporary Society, No. XXI - Spring 91 - Pesach 5751 has an article by Rabbi Michael Broyde - Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School, and Rabbi Howard Jachter - Associate Rabbi of Congregation Beth Judah in Brooklyn which gives Rabbi Auerbach's opinion in his own words. The article concludes that current ...


6

Halachipedia brings a number of opinions permitting this R Josh Flug (Sukkot To Go 5770, p. 27) writes that it is certainly permissible to use a toilet with an automatic flusher if no other restroom is available because most assume that using electricity is prohibited only d’rabanan and therefore is permitted for kavod habriyot. He says that ...


5

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


5

In the sefer Rishumei Aahron(Rav Aahron Felder) chelek 2 pg 27 he brings from Rav Moshe that it is mutar to move a lamp(with a cord) on Shabbas lzorech gufo and mimkomo.


5

To make a circuit it must be a complete circuit, i.e. a full unbroken circle. If there is no bulb then you did not make a complete circuit, since the bulb is part of that circle. This seems to be a science question, not a halachik one. Personally I tape down the switch because modern fridges do other functions besides turn on a light. Fancier fridges will ...


4

Reasons to prohibit: Electrical generation in Israel involves a Jew doing melacha on Shabbat, and since it is forbidden to benefit from such work, one shouldn't use electricity from the public utilities on Shabbat. Reasons to permit: Electricity is required to power hospitals and other life-saving functions. Therefore, it is permitted for Jews to generate ...


4

Being that no action is done, the question here is not a question of whether one would be transgressing a prohibition, but rather whether one would be permitted to derive benefit from the items which were affected by an apparent violation (הנאה). In a broad sense, the halachot of deriving benefit from a transgression are fairly clear (see Shulchan Aruch 276 ...


4

Either A) Get a pair of timers for the lamps OR B) Switch both lamps on before Shabbos and leave them on all Shabbos. Just point only one at the snake at a time.


4

Rav Moshe Feinstein: One does not recite a blessing. Rav Aharon Lichtenstein: One does recite a blessing. Both rabbis agree that one can use incandescent (preferably unfrosted) light bulbs in a "pressing situation," (eg. fire hazard, or you don't have candles). Ask your rabbi for practical applications. Regarding the second part of your question: Would ...


4

Recording on shabbat is linked to use of microphones on Shabbat (since you require microphones to record). It might be in this context that you heard R Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (RSZA) being quoted since he wrote on that topic. R Yisrael Rozen from Zomet (an Israeli institute that creates IT equipment and electronic appliances designed to meet Halakha) has a ...


4

R Howard Jachter wrote here a long article on the topic -- find a summary below with light edits. To immediately answer the question of those who rule more strictly he cites R Tzvi Pesach Frank, R Mordechai Yaakov Breish & R Yitzchak Yaakov Weiss and those who recommend that one to be strict if possible: Rav Yosef Henkin and Rav Ovadia Yosef. Rav ...


3

In Shmirat Shabbat K'Hilchato in 13:32 he discusses using a dimmer - and permits it, though he recommends covering/taping up the switch. In the footnote (112) he says that since light bulbs do not flicker, there's no issue with "fixing the wick". He has some sources there which I did not follow up on. It would seem that he would not allow the use of ...


3

The problem occurred to me when I was visiting Japan. I went to the manager of the hotel on Friday and explained the issues. He directed me to one of the non-electronic doors which he would leave open over a generous time window when I expected to be coming in and out. This also worked in another smaller hotel in Japan where we used the staff entrance on ...


3

See Rabbi Torczyner's lecture on attending conferences. If I understood and recall his lecture correctly: Generally speaking, where necessary it would be permissible — assuming that the speaker would be using the same electronic devices regardless of your presence. (Rabbi Torczyner always starts with "ask your local synagogue rabbi for actual psak",...


3

The Avnei Yashfei 30:5 writes that using a faucet does not count as using a kli since it is connected(to pipes) to the the house and has a din of being attached and cannot be considered a kli(utensil). So even turning the faucet on and off with your hands wouldn't help. Rav Eliyashiv holds this way as well and is also quoted in Ashrei Ha'Ish(Chelek 1:pg.203 ...


3

Rav Nachum Rabinovitch, shlit"a, (who holds electricity is only, at worst, an issue of uvda d'chol [weekday activity] has ruled allowing the use of hotel key cards even when they trigger an LED (see here). Your scenario would seem to be even less of an issue. (I believe he has also accordingly allowed the use of baby monitors even where an LED indicates ...


3

The story you are looking for is about the Tosafist Rabbi Yechiel of Paris. From a quick search it seems like the source is from Éliphas Lévi in his book Histoire de la magie, (The History of Magic), 1860. See this post which brings the story: http://www.ancientpages.com/2014/04/24/mystery-ancient-ever-burning-lamps/


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