Hot answers tagged

10

The source for mentioning dreams in Birkas Kohanim comes from the Gemara in Berachos 55b האי מאן דחזא חלמא ולא ידע מאי חזא, ליקום קמי כהני בעידנא דפרסי ידייהו ולימא הכי The William Davidson (Koren Steinsaltz) translation: One who saw a dream and does not know what he saw should stand before the priests when they lift their hands during the Priestly ...


9

Basically the answer would be the same as an answer to a question how do we distinguish reality from a dream. The realness of a prophecy would be overwhelming. Rabeinu Crescas addresses this question in his book "Ohr Hashem" (Maamar 2, Rule 4, Ch. 3). וזה, שכמו שיש יתרון להרגש החוש על הרגש הדמיון, שבעבורו יודע המרגיש והוא ער, שאיננו מרגיש בדמיון לבד, ...


8

Perhaps you wouldn't know, without someone to educate you. Ramchal, Derech Hashem, 3:4:3: הנה אפשר שיגיע גילוי ממנו ית' אל אדם והוא לא יכיר בו כמו שיכיר הנביא אלא יחשבהו בא מן המורגשות עד שיגבר עליו השפע הנבואיי ואז יכיר הענין כמות שהוא באמת. ומן המין הזה היתה קריאת ה' לשמואל שלא התנבא מתחלה ולא שפע עליו השפע אלא שנגלה עליו קול כקול מורגש ולא השיג בזה ...


7

I heard the following explanation from R' Rivlin, Mashgiach of Kerem B'Yavneh (although I'm sure it's found in earlier sources somewhere): Pharaoh had a dream in which there was a startling heretical image - he was standing on the chief god of Egypt, the Nile (Bereishis 41:1)! When he related this dream to others, he wanted to hide this point, and so he ...


7

There are a number of places where near death experience are described in the Talmud. Here are 2, but there are more similar cases: מסכת בבא בתרא דף י' א Joseph the son of R. Joshua. He had been ill and fell in a trance. [After he recovered], his father said to him: ‘What vision did you have?’ He replied, ‘I saw a world upside down, the upper ...


7

Yalkut Shim'oni, parashat Naso, remez taf shin yud, expounds Song of Songs verses 3:7-8 in relation to birkat cohanim: Behold, it is the bed of Solomon; sixty mighty men are about it, of the mighty men of Israel. They all handle the sword, and are expert in war; every man hath his sword upon his thigh, because of dread in the night. The sixty mighty men ...


7

Certainly not. There is a Gemara (Berachos 57a) which mentions interpretations of various dreams, and many of them include doing a sin. For example: הבא על נערה מאורסה יצפה לתורה שנאמר (דברים לג, ד) תורה צוה לנו משה מורשה קהלת יעקב אל תקרי מורשה אלא מאורשה If one dreams he has intercourse with a betrothed maiden, he may expect to obtain ...


6

If the verse omitted either one of the two actions (to rise and to remaining standing upright) we would not get the full picture of the dream Yosef is describing. If the verse omitted "rose up," one might think the sheaf was already standing and that it could have been placed in that position by human agency. Therefore, the verse tells us that it "rose up" ...


6

Yes. The Gemara says (Berachot 55b) in the of Rabbi Yohanan that three dreams are fulfilled and of them is a dream that happened early in the morning. Maharsha says there that the reason is because all the things that happened the day before are usually dreamt about late at night and in the morning the mind is fresh to have a "real dream".


6

The Y'fe Soar (commentary to the Midrash Raba 89:6) explains that Pharaoh saw the interpretation of the dream in the dream itself but forgot it. Since this interpretation didn't remind him of the one he'd seen, he knew it was wrong. Y'de Moshe (commentary to the Midrash Raba there) explains that this interpretation didn't fit the dream very well, to Pharaoh'...


5

I heard the following approach from R' Rivlin, Mashgiach of Kerem b'Yavneh. Pharaoh was looking for more than just a clever interpretation based on the art of dream interpretation - he was looking for an interpreter who showed himself to know what the dream was and meant. Pharaoh made slight changes in his relating of the dream, and Yosef identified this ...


5

The person who had the dream should do a hatavat chalom with three good friends. It's found in some siddurim (I believe the Artscroll interlinear has it) It should be pointed out, though, that the interpretation of dreams can be very counterintuitive and is in fact usually the opposite of what you would expect. See Shulchan Aruch O.C. 288, where a dream of ...


4

The rhetorical usage of "Oh yeah, we'll see what will be with that" is modern, but the proper usage of ונראה is the future tense, waiting to see what will happen as a result of their actions.


4

Medrash Hagodol - Mikeitz - page 625 says that Yosef asked Paroh how did he know that the advisors did not interpet the dream properly? Paroh told him that he saw the interpretation in the dream and therefore he knew what they said is untrue. “אמר לו יוסף: מי הודיעך שלא פתרוהו כראוי? אמר לו: כשם שראיתי את החלום, כך ראיתי את פתרונו, לכן אינם יכולים לשחק ...


4

As per this article (Dirshu), it must be done in front of three men, even if the person that had the dream was a woman. As per this answer (Rav Yuval Cherlow), it is preferred to do it with members of your gender. According to this article, family members may be used (Rav Moshe Shternbuch in the name of the Brisker Rav). This would likely help many people ...


4

See Magen Avraham OHC 288/6 quotes the Sefer Magid Mesharim (Vayakhel) which states that the Beis Yosef was told by the "Maggid" that he was correct in ruling that only 3 dreams allowed fasting on Shabbos, [one being one who dreams that a Sefer Torah was burned], but one who dreams of a Sefer Torah falling on Shabbos should not fast then. Rabbi Tzvi Hirsh ...


4

Perhaps you were listening to the song "*Shomrei hafkid l'ircha kol hayom v'kol halaila" which in turn is inspired by the verse in Isaiah 62:6-7 "Upon your walls, O Jerusalem, I have set watchmen, Who shall never be silent By day or by night. O you, the LORD’s remembrancers (sic), Take no rest - And give no rest to Him, Until He establish Jerusalem And make ...


4

There was also a dream Midrash Ester Rabba 10 וְנָדְדָה שְׁנַת הַמֶּלֶךְ אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ, שֶׁרָאָה בַּחֲלוֹמוֹ אֶת הָמָן שֶׁנָּטַל סַיָּף לְהָרְגוֹ, וְנִבְהַל וְהֵקִיץ מִשְׁנָתוֹ, וְאָמַר לְסוֹפְרָיו הָבִיאוּ סֵפֶר הַזִּכְרוֹנוֹת לִקְרוֹת וְלִרְאוֹת מַה שֶּׁעָבַר עָלָיו, וּפָתְחוּ הַסְּפָרִים וּמָצְאוּ אֶת הַדָּבָר שֶׁהִגִּיד מָרְדֳּכַי עַל בִּגְתָנָא ...


3

In Kovetz Sichos vol. 2 R' Nosson Meir Wachtfogel explains as follows: A dream's meaning depends on its interpretation (Berachos 55b). A positive interpretation yields a positive fulfillment, and the same with a negative interpretation. When Pharaoh's advisors offered him interpretations, he rejected them because they were undesirable, and so he insisted ...


3

"Let My Nation Descend" says that Paroh also dreamt and forgot the interpretation, and he was hoping that someone could jog his memory. He knew Yosef's was correct because he recognized it.


3

Rashi in Sanhedrin 30a says: בעל החלום. שר המראה חלומות בלילה The Master of Dreams is some sort of celestial messenger in charge of what you see when you dream. On the other hand, Chazal (Brachot 55b) knew that you tend to dream about what you thought about during the day. אין מראין לו לאדם אלא מהרהורי לבו So possibly this Master of Dreams is only ...


3

The Malbim explains that the difference between עמד and יצב is that עמד just means the position of standing, as opposed to sitting or walking etc. whereas יצב is where you are actively standing, i.e. standing intentionally and against adversary. One could be standing because they were standing a moment ago and nothing has changed, or could be standing ...


3

I can't imagine, IOW I don't know of any, halachos that directly apply, in an instructive manner, to a sleeping person. Halachah governs a conscious person. For this reason R. Emden rules (Resp. vol. 2 §97:3) that a sleeping person does not get reward or punishment for actions executed in his sleep. R. Chizkiyah Medini (Sdei Chemed here) presents a lengthy ...


2

I once heard, but I don't recall where, that there is another possible reason to say it even if you didn't have a bad dream - part of the Ribbono Shel Olam mentions dreams that others have had about you, which you will most likely not be aware of.


2

Sifte'i Hakhamim on RaSh"I (Bereshit 41:8 s.v. לפערה) states (my translation): אבל כשאמר לו יוסף שיהיה רעב בארץ היה לו קורת רוח לפי שאמר שלכך הראה לו הקב״ה כדי לעשות תקנה למדינה שלא ימותו ברעב שחלומות המלכים אינם דברים פרטיים רק דברים כוללים כל מלכותו או כל העולם כחלומותיו של נבוכדנצר לכך לא היה לו קורת רוח But, when Yoseph told him there would be a ...


2

What is odd about this pasuk is the sequence of tenses. Normally, once we start with a consecutive vav construction (ואמרנו), and the subject stays the same (ie. the sentence is unmarked: there's no contrast involved, or there's not quotation), we continue using consecutive vav. The major exception is when a word intervenes in the clause before the verb, ...


2

Concerning the issue of having to wash your hands,the Halacha is that if the cost of your search of water will be your passing over the time to daven one should skip the hand washing.This is found in the Mechaber Siman 92' s'eef 4'. Now in our scenario if he were to get up and wash his hands he would have gotten out of his dream and lost this learning ...


2

The Aish Rabbi has a good article on dreams which is worth reading in its entirety. Some extracts follow: Judaism sees dreams as usually inconsequential but once in a while significant. On the one hand, the Talmud calls dreams 1/60th of prophecy. On the other hand, the Talmud writes that the interpretation of dreams is in the hands of the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible