7

There is an old Kabbalistic idea discussed here to place them inside a Sefer! Many Poskim have decried this practice, including R' Ovadia Yosef who is quoted in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Yalkut Yosef 153:17: וכל שכן שאסור להצניע בתוך ספרי קודש שערות הזקן


7

The Talmud discusses Genizoth. I don't recall off-hand the context, but I remember learning a Gemara that said students of great sages in the Tannaic era, when writing Torah SheBe'Al Peh was prohibited, would take notes that they would later commit to memory before placing in Genizah. In addition (or in contrast, perhaps), if a scribe made an uncorrectable ...


6

The document itself is given to the husband to prove that he actually paid the כתובה. He can dispose of it however he desires. Or alternatively, she gives him a שובר (a receipt) documenting that he actually paid her, and she can do with the כתובה whatever she pleases.


6

The Mishna on Megilla 28a rules that a destroyed synagogue retains holiness, and if grasses grew on it they should not be picked because they add to the feeling of despair. (The subsequent Gemara on 29b discusses picking the grasses and leaving them there, though the Rambam (Perush HaMishna 3:4) and the Mishna Berura (OC 151 sk 29) both understand this to be ...


5

A scroll can be repaired by specially trained people, or, if it is beyond repair, it can be ritually stored/buried. http://www.sofer.co.uk/html/repairing_a_scroll.html is a site for one person who explains some of hat he does (I am not affiliated with him and am not endorsing his services -- just using his website to illustrate some of the possibilities). ...


4

The laws of fixing a Torah scroll are found in Shulchan Aruch YD 279. The Keset HaSofer, by Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried, writes about them in Chapter 19. He writes that if 3 mistakes are found at once, then the whole scroll needs to be checked over as it has lost its assumption of being accurate. Similarly, if 85 mistakes were found (cf Sifrei Zuta 10:33), even ...


4

This is prohibited as erasing God's name. If you wrote יה as God's name and then want to follow it up with ודה to make the name יהודה, that is prohibited (Soferim 5:2, Keset Hasofer 12:3). Your case is even worse since you are acting on the letters of God's name themselves (cf. Lishkat Hasofer ibid.).


3

Matzot (plural of matza) have no inherent sanctity. As such, you can treat these boxes as you would treat two new boxes of cookies that were left in the waiting room. You can give them away, open them and eat them, discard them, etc. Judaism doesn't like wasting valuable things (it is called Bal Tashchit, see here and here) but two boxes of matzot are not ...


3

"The sages taught: Tashmishei mitzva (objects used to perform a mitzva) may be discarded; tashmishei kedusha (accessories of kedusha) are buried. And these are tashmishei mitzva: a succa, lulav, shofar and tzitzit. And these are tashmishei kedusha: cases of books (=Torah scrolls), tefillin and mezuzot, a bag of a Torah scroll, the sack of tefillin, and its ...


3

The following poskim say the metzius is that there are no roosters at egg farms so chickens do not mate and produce eggs which are fertile. Therefore, if one does find a blood spot in an egg, all he has to do is throw out the blood spot and he then may eat the rest of the egg: Yechaveh Da’as 3:57, Yabea Omer Y.D. 2:5, Minchas Yitzchok 4:56, Opinion ...


3

See this article from Rabbi Moshe Dovid Lebovits. In short, technically you could just remove the blood spot itself. However common practice today, barring extenuating circumstances, is to throw out the entire egg.


3

They remove them from time to time,and they place them in genizah. http://matzav.com/photos-kosel-undergoes-cleaning-for-pesach-kvitlach-removed-2 http://www.vosizneias.com/80339/2011/04/06/jerusalem-in-photos-kotel-undergoes-spring-clean-for-pessach/


3

Israeli archeologists found a treasure of 300,000 (!) bronze coins near the Dead Sea, several years ago and Chanan Eshel z"l, a ben-Torah archeologist from Ofrah wrote about how he believes that they are coins from hekdesh and charamot that were actually שמג ךןאקרשךךט thrown in Yam HaMelach! See https://daf-yomi.com/DYItemDetails.aspx?itemId=8318


2

You are allowed to bring them back in. See Rivevos Ephraim 1:222:19 who writes that you can do so as you'll need to use it for more trash, and you may be worried that someone will take your trash can. It would be ideal to wait until after Yom Tov, though.


2

Hmmm ... pretty much as I suspected and said n my comment. See here and refer to reference #31. One should not throw garbage such as candy wrappers or tissues on the floor of a shul. There is an uncertainty if one has to pick up garbage that he sees on the floor of the shul. It would seem that the right thing to do is to pick up the garbage from ...


2

Oz Nidbaru 7:65:2 says that one may throw invitations with Pesukim on them into the garbage, so long they are wrapped in something.


2

Items once used for a mitzvah (tashmishei mitzvah) that wore out do not require genizah, according to the letter of the law. Mishnah Berurah 21:1 (א) חוטי ציצית וכו' - וה"ה לכל תשמישי מצוה כגון סוכה ולולב ושופר וכל כה"ג לאחר שנתבטלו ואינם עומדין עוד למצותן: But it is still good to put them in genizah, and not just chuck them straight in the garbage, ...


2

Yahrtzeit is a minhag, although a fairly "strong" one. However, as it is a minhag, I don't believe that there is any kedusha attached to a burning yahrtzeit candle, and even less to an empty one. Years ago, the ayhrtzeit candles were bigger in size and had much thicker glass. My grandmother saved them for drinking glasses (yes, as kid I broke a number of ...


2

There are 3 issues with meat and dairy: cooking it, eating it and getting pleasure from a cooked meat and milk mixture (such as feeding an animal a meat/milk combination). Cooking may be an issue if it is yad soledes bo. So boiling meat sauce should not be poured on top of dairy in your trash can as it can "cook" it according to Halacha. So some hold it is ...


2

Yes. Rabbi Ephraim Greenblatt (Rivevos Ephraim 7:303:1) writes that it is best to take them out before Yom Tov, but you can take them out on Yom Tov. פה המנהג שמוציאים את פח הזבל לרחוק ביום ג׳ ויום ו׳ ומשם באים הגוים שעובדים עבור העריה ומריקים, ומותר להוציא בחוץ כגרף של רעי או שאינו מוקצה, (או אולי יותר טוב להוציא לפני יום טוב),


1

Based on @Sam's comment on an answer to another MY question I just came across, Rav Elyashiv allows throwing out hair.


1

The Radak on bereshis 6:16 (10 lines from the bottom) brings the midrash rabbah which mentions a kind of trapdoor through which Noach shoveled the garbage out. According to this, it seems that the teiva did not keep its waste, as some might think, so there was no terrible stink or unpleasant smell, which would greatly affect the insiders.


1

It is permitted, as the prohibition of wasting shmitta produce only applies to the parts of the fruit normally eaten by people. See in the following link shiur number 11 for detailed sources on the matter: http://eretzhemdah.org/content.asp?PageId=823&lang=he


1

In addition to the previous answers, I have heard (I will try to add sources when possible) that it is not recommended to put them in a Sefer that does not belong to you, as it is repulsive to the other users, and Putting it in a Sefer only makes sense if you generally treat your beard as having a certain kedusha. I.e. one who regularly trims his beard ...


1

I just read here: https://halachablog.com/2016/04/13/the-shankbone-and-the-egg-at-the-seder/ that we actually eat it, since it was forbidden to leave it uneaten after a day.


1

The ketubah is merely a prenuptial agreement and once the husband has paid what he promised it is an expired document which the husband can throw away or burn.


1

Rabbi Isaac Yosef in ילקוט יוסף writes to the effect that a public sign can effect the transfer of ownership of a lost object to the synagogue: מן הראוי שבמקומות ציבוריים, כמו ישיבה ומוסדות צבור, הנהלת הישיבה או המוסד יכתבו הודעה במקום גלוי, שלפי תקנת המוסד כל מי שלא יבא לקחת חפציו או את ספריו עד זמן מסויים, אין המוסד אחראי עליהם, וההנהלה תשתמש בהם כרצונה....


1

In Rav Avigdor Nebontzols Kuntres Hahanhagos(it is in his six chelek of Mishna Brurah) 43: Things found in a yeshiva need to settled when Eliyahu comes.He writes that it is best for them to publicize that anything left after so and so time is hefker or belongs to the yeshiva.


1

In a recent Friday radio Q&A program, R Avraham Yosef (previously Chief Rabbi of Holon, son of R Ovadia Yosef) said explicitly there was no prohibition of wearing a deceased person shoes, except for those he was wearing at the time he passed away. I now found the reference to Yalkut Yosef 21:11 here. This is in line with the third opinion cited from ...


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