26

Thank you for your sensitivity in asking this question. As pointed out in comments, you are actually Jewish (whether you follow Judaism or not). But as you say in your question, you've been raised with Christianity and it doesn't appear that you've rejected that. You see Judaism as part of your cultural background, if I'm reading you correctly, the way ...


22

This practice seems to be (at least) as old as the Gemara, as the Gemara states in Brachos 27b: 'R. Yirmiah b. Abba is different, because he was a disciple-colleague. [This can be proven by the fact that] R. Jeremiah b. Abba said to Rav: Have you made havdalah? He replied: Yes, I have; and he did not say to him, has the master made havdalah' In ...


20

In the manuscript Parma 3173 there is no "מישראל"; In the manuscript Budapest Kaufman A50 no more; The Mishna of Mechon Mamre, Mishna Sanhedrin 4:5 based on Rambam manuscript idem; לפיכך נברא אדם יחידי בעולם, ללמד שכל המאבד נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו איבד עולם מלא; וכל המקיים נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו קיים עולם מלא. ‏ In Shinuye Nussachaot Shas ...


12

the Talmud in Beitza 25b says: "Why was the Torah given to the Jewish People? Because they are the most brazen of all nations."


12

This opinion comes from the Rama in EH 55:1, and Rav Soloveitchik was makpid on this (Nefesh HaRav pg.255). Text of Rama: הארוסה, אסורה לבעלה מדברי סופרים, כל זמן שהיא בבית אביה; והבא על ארוסתו בבית חמיו, מכין אותו מכת מרדות.‏ הגה: ואפילו ביחוד אסורים; ולכן ארוס שהוא עם ארוסתו בבית אחד, מברכין שבע ברכות פן יתיחדו (מרדכי פרק קמא דכתובות). ויש אומרים דאין להם ...


11

Thanks to Reddit user Bar Kappara (by way of @Isaac Moses) for this answer: Devarim Rabba 3:3: It is told of Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach that he once purchased an ass from an Ishmaelite. When his disciples came, they found a jewel suspended from its neck and said, "Master, 'The blessing of Hashem, it makes rich.'" [Proverbs 10:22] Rabbi Simon ben Shetach ...


11

The only thing that would be offensive is if you posed as accepting the Jewish faith and then went around telling everyone that they have to believe in Jesus.


11

I think every situation is different depending on the nature of the friendship between the chavrusas and how sensitive the person is. But I will tell you some things that I have seen done: I had a friend breaking up with a very sensitive chavrusa. He (my friend) happens to be a very funny guy. One day, with as much obviously fake pomp as he could muster, ...


10

שלחן ערוך סימן צז סעיף א (titled: "שלא יגהק ושלא יפהק בשעת התפלה," "Not to yawn during prayers") לא יגהק (מוציא מגופו לפיו נפיחה מתוך שובעו, רייטי"ר בלע"ז). ולא יפהק (פותח פיו להוציא רוח הפה) ואם צריך לפהק מתוך אונס יניח ידו על פיו שלא תראה פתיחתו. Do not burp or yawn [during prayers]; and if one must yawn, one should cover his mouth with his ...


9

First of all, I think it's important to point out that, like all stereotypes, the proliferation of the stereotype is generally a result of bigotry and ignorance. One can just look at the overwhelming number of hospitals and community centers donated by Jews, disproportionate to other religions, as a proof that we aren't greedy. This is even with excluding '...


9

Thanks for your consideration in asking this ahead of time. It seems to me that, not only would it not be disrespectful to light a Chanukah menorah in memory of your friend, it would be fairly traditional. Although the idea behind a menorah is to remind people of, or advertise, the miracles that Chanukah celebrates, it is, after all, a burning lamp, which is ...


9

Water is explicitly mentioned as problematic in the Talmud. Bechorot 44b אמר רבי אבא בריה דרבי חייא בר אבא משתינין מים בפני רבים ואין שותין מים בפני רבים ותניא נמי הכי משתינין מים בפני רבים ואין שותין מים בפני רבים R. Abba b. R. Hiyya b. Abba reported in the name of R. Johanan: It is permitted to urinate in public, whereas it is not permitted to drink water ...


7

R' Ari Enkin has a great article on this: http://www.torahmusings.com/2011/03/jesus/ He theorizes that it is preferable to wish another Merry Christmas than Merry Xmas On a related note, there does not seem to be any halachic advantage to using “Xmas” over “Christmas” as many are accustomed to do. This is because “X” (the Greek letter “Chi”) is not only ...


7

Chacham Ovadia Yosef in Yabia Omer 5:30 writes that picking ones nose is a davar she'eino mitkavein for pulling out hairs and should be permissible, but we are stringent and forbid it when it's a p'sik reisha. He also brings a case of rubbing ones beard is also a p'sik reisha seemingly. He then brings a story of the Arizal who on shabbas touched his beard ...


7

Maharsha writes on that story: הואיל והוו יתבי רבנן ולא מיחו בו: איכא למימר מה שלא מיחו מפני שלא היה בידם למחות אפשר שעשו כן כי החנופה היא שגברה באותו הדור כמ"ש בסוטה גבי אגריפס המלך One could say that the reason that the rabbis didn't object was because they were not able to object. It's also possible that they did this out of flattery, which ...


7

Kraina D'Igrasa 1:59 - Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael Kanievsky Zatzal writes that one who does not return the Seforim to its place is doing a Midah Achzorios and is a Rasha. Alternatively you can print one of the pictures in this link and show what the Shul can look like if Sefarim are not returned to their place, or even better just do this a few times until the ...


7

I was once in a Beis Medrash which used the following tactic. They had signs up which said that the sefarim were only available to use on condition that you return them to the shelf. So if you don't return them, you have borrowed them without permission and are a thief. So you could add לא תגזול to your next sign if you would like to go this route.


7

Definitely a good idea to lay the blame on yourself and not on him as others have been saying as this will always be most comfortable for the other person. I think you could also say that you need a chizzuk and you feel that by trying a new chavrusa it will revive you and be mechazek your learning. Starting something new often gives someone a boost so he may ...


6

As far as I am aware, there is no Jewish rabbinical or Torah source that Jews are any ruder or greedier than any other nation. On the contrary, the Talmud states that kindness is a fundamental characteristic of the Jewish people: "The Jewish nation is distinguished by three characteristics: they are merciful, they are modest, and they perform acts of loving-...


6

Copied from Speaking to a Rabbi in Third Person: The Bach (Y.D. 242:6) seems to believe that while such a practice (referring to one's teacher in third person) is appropriate, it is not an absolute requirement, and therefore if one is having an extended conversation with one's teacher, the second person may be used after the first time the teacher is ...


6

From what I saw during while being in Yeshiva for 10 yrs. the Rabbiem are happier when they are constantly called Rebbi. I don't think they are looking for honor. They want you to honor the Torah. The following is from the Yeshiva Website: It seems from the Rambam that the source of speaking to someone in third person out of respect is not a Halachah. ...


6

Rabbi Ahron Lopianksy asked my father not to refer to him in the third person while conversing.


5

Note: I'm not Jewish, but I have studied the relevant subjects enough to be able to answer the question, at least to some extent. The explanation for these ugly accusations against Jews is not related to Jewish scripture. It is the result of a combination of factors, most of which are much more closely related to Christian scriptures and the political ...


5

My personal experience, as Shaliach tzibur, to silence the Schul talkers has been to stop as soon as I sensed any utterances coming from the congregation. Following a few seconds of showing my "respect" for their private conversations, utter silence would reign. One or two more such treatments allowed me to complete the prayer properly. No rabbi and no ...


5

Beis Yosef to Tur O.C. 170 s.v. לא יאכל לא יאחוז פרוסה כביצה בידו בפעם אחת והעושה כן הרי זה רעבתן ומשמע מלשון הברייתא שאם אוחז פרוסה כביצה אע״פ שאינו אוכל אלא קצת ממנו נקרא רעבתן Do not hold a piece the size of a beitza in your hand at one time, and one who does so is a glutton. And the implication of the Baraisa is that if he holds it, ...


5

What has worked for me is telling the Chavrusa that my schedule changed and I am unable to continue learning at this time, thereby blaming me and not him, so it does not get personal.


5

It's understandable that the synagogue rules would ban photography inside the synagogue on the sabbath, even for gentiles. (As far as I'm aware, Jewish law does not.) Photography is forbidden for Jews then; therefore, having someone around snapping photos can be disconcerting and disturb people's sense of sabbath. That may even apply in the synagogue ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch (in Yore De'ah סימן רמב - שלא להורות בפני הרב, ודין רב שמחל על כבודו) discusses greeting one's Rav - and mentions that one doesn't greet him as one does any other person, and possibly one shouldn't greet him at all. טז לֹא יִתֵּן שָׁלוֹם לְרַבּוֹ וְלֹא יַחֲזִיר לוֹ שָׁלוֹם, כְּדֶרֶךְ שְׁאָר הָעָם, אֶלָּא שׁוֹחֶה לְפָנָיו וְאוֹמֵר לוֹ ...


5

Assuming you aren't Jewish, there would be no mitzvah (commandment) for you to light the menorah, but I don't see anything wrong with it. I will add that perhaps the best way to honor your deceased friend is doing good deeds in his name, like tzedakah (charity). Take a look at this webpage to learn how to light the menorah. Just one catch, though - since ...


5

I can see two sources in the talmud: A. Avodah Zarah 58b מאי א"ל אסור משום לך לך אמרין נזירא סחור סחור לכרמא לא תקרב Rabbi Asi repeated his question: What is the halakha? Rabbi Yoḥanan said to Rabbi Asi: Although the gentile did not touch the wine when diluting it, it is prohibited by rabbinic decree due to the maxim: Go, go, we say to a ...


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