12

Yekke Jews are of German ancestry. They have a number of very strong traditions that set them a bit apart from the rest of "Ashkenazi" Jewry, including, but not limited to, young men wearing a Tallith Gadol prior to marriage, and slightly different cantillation tunes than most Ashkenazim.


12

It refers to the Jewish community of Germany, especially of Frankfurt-am-Main and its vicinity, which (the community of Frankfurt) was later transplanted to other places, especially the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. Wikipedia has more.


11

The vast majority of shuls self-identified as Orthodox are mainstream. So chances are, any Orthodox shul or community you approach will be mainstream. Sabbateans are non-existent, as far as I know. Karaites are very rare and will not pretend to be Orthodox. Any Orthodox shul without a mechitza (I hear there are a few left) is outside of the mainstream, ...


9

I studied in Brisk in Yerushalyim and what I saw from my Rosh Yeshiva and his family was that they use regular ashkenazi siddurim but by heart they incorporate their own nuschaos and minhagim (ie. most often following the Gr"a, for example, ommitting נא in the blessing of rachem in bentching. Also ברחמיו in Bonei Yerushalayim is omitted. However, they don'...


8

Presenting a strictly Chareidi point of view on this site is like walking into a minefield, but here goes. There were definitely religious leaders who were against instituting a special day to commemorate the Holocaust, but not all gave their reasoning. One reason that was given came from Rabbi Gedalia Schor as quoted in Meged Givos Olam. The author there ...


7

Wikipedia deals with the question: The Chief Rabbinate of Israel, in 1949, under the guidance of Ben-Zion Meir Hai Uziel and Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog, decided that the Tenth of Tevet should be the national remembrance days for victims of the Holocaust. The Tenth of Tevet fast commemorates the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II. For this day, it ...


7

For a historical work that also dives deep into the divergent philosophies of different Hasidic sages, it is hard to beat Hasidism: A New History by David Biale, David Assaf, Benjamin Brown, Uriel Gellman, Samuel Heilman, Moshe Rosman, Gadi Sagiv, and Marcin Wodziński. It actually contains much more than you are looking for as it is an in-depth study of ...


6

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


5

Here's a quick chart I made, based on my own knowledge. It flows chronologically from top-to-bottom, and is not drawn to scale. (Horizontal axis is meaningless.) Bold boxes are groups that are still around today. Italic boxes are general categories. Dashed lines indicate unknown or disputed; Curved lines indicate indirect relationship. Dates are ...


5

The Hebrew Israelite issue is a demonstration of how complete and unfounded wannabism can be turned into a reality. Towards the end of the 19th century some African-Americans churches who previously had identified themselves with the ancient Hebrews shifted into an identification as ancient Hebrews. This movement gave birth to various groups, mostly clear ...


5

Echoing others, the answer to this question is elusive and is likely to remain so: We are beset by many problems. And our thorniest and perhaps most disabling problem is, curiously, an "identity crisis"--perhaps a sign of our youthfulness as an ideological movement. Objectively examined, what binds us together as a separate entity is our full ...


5

I heard from R. Nota Greenblatt (the eminent posek of Memphis and the greater South) that since the original enactment to read the Torah did not include the familiar rate of once a year, that in a case of need e.g. the baal korei has difficulty reading the whole parsha, then one could finish the Torah less frequently. He implied that one would not even need ...


5

In Yerushalyaim it is common to find minyanim saying it. Furthermore, it is the official practice of the Mir yeshiva to say Yom Kippur Koton. Although the minhag is not widespread being that it is something that was practiced by exceedingly righteous as its source is in kabbala


5

An Alsatian associate told me that the custom of Alsatian Jews is to perform kapparot with a fish.


4

This is a huge and unanswerable question... I'll take a stab at some general observations. First of all, while it's common colloquially to refer to anyone who is not Ashkenazi as "Sephardi", the term technically applies only to the communities of the Iberian peninsula (today Spain/Portugal) and their descendants (who ended up in places like Amsterdam, ...


4

I think it's a corruption of "tovot v'neimot" -- may you (plural) merit to many good, pleasant years. If you check with Rabbi Google, searching on תזכו לשנים רבות טובות, you'll see the concluding word is generally "ne'imot." This website (of which I know nothing else) records a Sephardic practice where you say "may you merit to many years", and the other ...


4

What is World ORT? World ORT is as much a 'movement' as an organisation. Yes, we were founded in St Petersburg in 1880 and, since then, we have become the world's largest Jewish education and vocational training NGO. The acronym ‘ORT’ comes from its original Russian name; ‘Organization for Rehabilitation and Training’ is a later innovation. But if we’re so ...


4

I am a ger who converted with Chabad Beis Din and ,BH ,I am accepted in Satmar ( they invited me to simches and they brought me to speak to their rebbe) I am also accepted in the yeshivis world ,got alyot in their shuls


4

Rabbi Eleazar Ben Hanania Ben Hizkiya. The evidence for this one is not 100% proof, but: 1) In Shabbat 13b it says that חנניה בן חזקיה וסעתו compiled Megillat Taanit. He is also identified as one of the leaders of Beit Shammai, and is known for "saving" the book of Ezekiel among other things. 2) We only have an Aramaic version of Megilat Taanit, but ...


4

The rebbetzin in my (Chabad) seminary said that people who are makpid on kabbalistic matters do this; others do not. One follows one's kallah teacher's instructions or else the husband's family's minhag. She did not make it sound at all like a necessary part of minhag Chabad. I don't know about the minhag by other chareidim. She was somewhat more clear that ...


4

Simply - this is the sign that the Pharisees were the ones with the correct tradition of the Torah. HaShem promised in our precious Torah that he would maintain the covenant he made with the forefathers with those that would listen to his laws, observing them and performing them. The Pharisees and their adherents did so, so they were preserved. The others ...


4

That "example" -- Ben Meir and Israel vs R' Saadia Gaon, the Gaonate, and Babylonia is the only such dispute over the calendar. I "published" on Avodah a copy of an article by R' Yosef Gavriel Bechhofer and R/Dr Ari Z Zevetofsky at Avodah v5n35 #8: Calendar Controversy Article. They propose an interesting possibility for the cause of the dispute. You ask ...


4

The Veretzky Rebbe you speak of is Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Labin of Bnei Brak. His father is Rabbi Naftali Tzvi Labin of Ziditchov. They are both descendants of Rabbi Yissachar Berish Eichenstein of Veretsky, author of Malbush L'Shabbos V'Yom Tov. Additionally, Veretsky is the Yiddish name for the town of Nyzhni Vorota in Ukraine, as you can see from this ...


3

Technically the Zilberman community in the old city do, but they wear them all day anyway


3

Heimish is used by both the hard-core Chasidish AND by the (for lack of a better term) Chasidish-lite (i.e. Chasidic background and customs but not dress.) It is not used by the Litvish (or the Yekkes for that matter) in the same context.


3

I am not Syrian, nor do I claim to know about why the Syrians do what they do, but this seems to be similar to what was done in the days of Kings David and Solomon. Yevamos 24a: ת''ר אין מקבלין גרים לימות המשיח כיוצא בו לא קבלו גרים לא בימי דוד ולא בימי שלמה א''ר אליעזר מאי קרא {ישעיה נד-טו} הן גור יגור אפס מאותי מי גר אתך עליך יפול אבל אידך לא ...


3

Historically, there were rabbinic authorities who cited the custom of singing this mizmor. Among Polish Jewry, the Matteh Moshe [R. Moshe Mat of Galicia, c. 1591] (see #48) and the Levush [R. Mordecai Yoffe, 1530-1612] (see ch. 51:1;7) indicate such a precedence. This custom was also practiced a generation later in Frankfurt, as indicated by the Yosef Ometz [...


3

I think that knowing what is socially acceptable to gift, you should be fine, but you have to know who you are giving to. It's always appropriate to ask if someone keeps cholov yisroel or does not listen to non-Jewish music. Most people who are more machmir tend to understand that they are more stringent and others ours, and will not find it insulting, but ...


3

Unfortunately I do not have the time to check each source specifically, but here are a few pointers: Rabbi Shalom Jerby from Nofit in Israel says that Sephardic communities in many places stand, including Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and more. Rabbi Ovadia Yosef says that even though lechatchila one should stand, there's a sod to sitting, and he brings a few ...


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