8

The largest cluster of lessons is 67. This occurs in a section of commentary covering the large majority of the book of II Samuel. Now for some more details: We have commentaries from Gersonides on the Scriptural books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, Job, Proverbs, Ruth,...


7

R. Menachem M. Kasher compiled such a bibliographic list in his Sare HaElef (Section 4), some of which is available here for free (though not the section you’re looking for).


7

Rambam states explicitly in the first paragraph of his introduction to Sefer Hamitzvot that the Commentary to the Mishnah came first: After having completed our previous well-known work wherein we included a commentary to the whole Mishnah – our goal in that work having been satisfied with the explanation of the substance of each and every Halacha in ...


6

Jewish commenters do not believe the banana to be the Forbidden Fruit, yet mention of it is made: In the Middle Ages, the notion that the Forbidden Fruit is the banana appeared in several places. In 1277 Nathan HaMe’ati translated the Rambam’s medical work Pirkei Moshe (Aphorisms of Moses) from Arabic into Hebrew. In the section detailing the medicinal ...


5

https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/2312384/jewish/Chapter-3-The-World-to-Come-Why-a-Bodily-Resurrection.htm provides a summary of the 2 opinions about Olam Haba, see there for more details. The Rambam* maintains that the World to Come (Olam Haba) is the World of Souls (Olam HaNeshamos), which is often referred to as the Garden of Eden (Gan Eden)....


5

A couple of speculative suggestions: 1) Neema H. Adlerblum writes the following in Chapter Two of A Study of Gersonides in his Proper Perspective: He writes somewhere that he could not go on with his writings "on account of the calamities of the times which interfered with clear thinking." She does not provide the source for this statement, but if ...


5

If you couldn’t tell from my previous answers to these kinds of questions, I highly recommend the Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew, which is based on the works of Rav Hirsch. The entry for פנה, pages 202-203, interprets the root as “turn to and focus attention.” Usage #8 is the one relevant here: “corner; walls joined from different directions” (...


5

HaShem helped me find it. In the back part of the Mikraos Gedolos I mentioned, it brings down a Zohar (Vol. 1, 58b) תָּא חֲזֵי, כֵּיוָן דְּאִתְיְילִיד נֹחַ חָמָא עוֹבָדֵיהוֹן דִּבְנֵי נָשָׁא דְּאִנּוּן חָטָאן קַמֵּי קוּדְשָׁא בְּרִיךְ הוּא, וְהֲוָה גָּנִיז גַּרְמֵיהּ וְאִשְׁתְּדָּל בְּפוּלְחָנָא דְּמָארֵיהּ. בְּגִין דְּלֹא לְמֵהַךְ בְּאוֹרְחַיְיהוּ. וְכִי ...


5

R' Samson Raphael Hirsch's translation1 of this verse is similar to the convention you cite: Thou shalt have no other God before My Presence. However, R' Hirsch's commentary on this verse does sound very much like it's directing us to take the phrase "לא יהיה" to mean an absolute negation of being1: ... If God is God, then everything except Him is "no-...


5

The Ramban wrote a letter to unnamed French rabbis in defense of the Rambam whose books were being banned at that time. "French rabbis" is how he generally refers to the authors of Tosafot (e.g. beginning of Pesachim). The letter is numbered 2 in the first volume of Kitvey Haramban (published by Mosad Harav Kook). The letter is also available online here ...


4

Here's an example from Shakh Choshen Mishpat 85:7 וראיתי בספר גדולי תרומה ריש שער ל"ד דף קמ"ו שהאריך בפלפולים של הבל בעמוד א' וב' וג' ובקושיות בדברי הרמב"ם ושאר פוסקים ואין כדאי להשיב על דבריו כי לא ירד כלל להבין סוגית הש"ס והאמת בסוגית הש"ס ובדעת הרמב"ם כמו שכתבתי והם דברים ברורים ואמיתיים בלי ספק כלל And I have seen in the book Gidulei Terumah in ...


4

According to Aryeh Kaplan, Genesis 12: A generic name for Egyptian kings (Josephus, Antiquities 8:6:2), coming from the Egyptian par ao, the 'Great House.' This lexicon on page 828 contains two separate entries for the verb פרע and פרעה. Neither mentions the other. Indeed the פרעה entry mentions the etymology cited above.


3

The Malbim in his Yair Ohr explains the difference between the 3 words שונא,אויב,צר. A שונא = a person(enemy) who hates someone in their heart only. A אויב = a person(enemy) who doesnt inflict harm personally for his name sake,but is happy when someone else does it. A צר = a person(enemy) who inflicts bad on others with their actions. It seems from this ...


3

In the Gemara Brochos 5a Rav Levi explains every word in the Passuk's to mean the entire written and oral Law were given at mount Sinai: וא"ר לוי בר חמא אמר ר' שמעון בן לקיש מאי דכתיב (שמות כד, יב) ואתנה לך את לוחות האבן והתורה והמצוה אשר כתבתי להורותם לוחות אלו עשרת הדברות תורה זה מקרא והמצוה זו משנה אשר כתבתי אלו נביאים וכתובים להורותם זה גמרא מלמד ...


3

Ther are 2 Explanations In the Peirush Tur Haoroch (Rav Yaakov Ben Asher 14th Century) קול ענות אנכי שומע. כ' הרמב"ן לא מפני שידע משה הדבר כי אדרבה לא להגיד לו כי לא רצה לספ' בגנותן של ישרא' אלא אמר קול זה הנשמע הוא כקול שחוק. The Ramban explains that Moshe and Yehoshua were both far away so when Yehoshua said to Moshe that the people were "at war" ...


3

This appears in Ramban's Derashah Al Divrei Kohelet: ויש לרבותינו בפסוק הזה שאלה שהקשו שיאמר דור בא ודור הולך והשיבו בזה סוד גדול מן הסודות הנכללות בכלל סוד העיבור והוא מדרשו של ר' נחוניא בן הקנה כמו שהזכרתי כי דברי שלמה כפולים ומכופלים בחכמה Here is an image of the passage in Kitvei Ramban Vol. I (Mossad Harav Kook, Jerusalem 1963): It is based on a ...


3

This insight can be found in Maharil Diskin Al HaTorah (Jerusalem 1985) in the commentary to Parshat Ki Tavo on page 139. Here is an image of the relevant passage:


3

According to R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on these verses, the point of this altar was to represent a counterpoint to Amalek, and the launch of an eternal defensive war against what Amalek represents. Where Amalek tries to destroy, Moshe builds. An altar is an inherently peaceful structure, devoted to God's service, and divorced from even a ...


3

In regards to eating the blood of a fish, the Rambam in Mishnah Torah, Ma'achalos Asuros 6:1 writes: אֲבָל דַּם דָּגִים וַחֲגָבִים וּשְׁקָצִים וּרְמָשִׂים וְדַם הָאָדָם אֵין חַיָּבִין עָלָיו מִשּׁוּם דָּם. לְפִיכָךְ דַּם דָּגִים וַחֲגָבִים טְהוֹרִים מֻתָּר לְאָכְלוֹ וַאֲפִלּוּ כְּנָסוֹ בִּכְלִי וְשָׁתָהוּ מֻתָּר. But the blood of fish and ...


3

My understanding of this is as follows: The Talmud here is citing a Mishnah in Ta'anit (12b) which discusses the progression of fasts when there is a lack of rain: עברו אלו ולא נענו ממעטין במשא ומתן בבנין ובנטיעה באירוסין ובנישואין ובשאילת שלום בין אדם לחבירו כבני אדם הנזופין למקום IF THESE PASSED AND THERE WAS [STILL] NO ANSWER TO THEIR PRAYERS ...


3

According to Midrash Pesikta de-Rav Kahana (Buber ed.) (Piska 2, p. 20b, at note 174) his full name is “Mispar Bigvai”. He was thus named, because he was (Mispar) “counted” while (Bigvai) “inside" (in utero). א"ר לוי בשם ר׳ שמואל בר נחמן, יוכבד נמנית במעי אמה, וכן בעולה גולה בקשו כ״ד משמרות ולא מצאו שלימין, ונמצא "מספר בגוי" (עזרא ב ב) עמהם. מהו "...


3

The reference is the Gemara in Chulin (65a) which discusses that two seemingly different birds are of the same species (min), and they therefore are found near each other. The same thing applies here. In both chapters the laws are enumerated to prevent override biblical law. The woman, because of her very nature may be more susceptible to carrying in public ...


3

Yom Hazikaron. That's a pretty "obvious" one. It's all over the Siddur.


2

The Alshich Hakodosh (16th century contempory of Beit Yosef) Asks This very question: Where was the Angel that was supposed to accompany Eliezer? He answers: עוד יתכן במאמרם ז"ל כי חמדו להם את כבוד עשרו ויתנו בברותו ראש ליורשו והמלאך אשר אתו היפך הקערות ואשר בה הסם שם לפני בתואל ועל כן אחרי אכלם לא נזכר כי אם אחיה ואמה וזה יורה ג"כ אומרו ויושם ולא נאמר ...


2

I have yet to find anything which ties this notion directly to the "bowing" etymology but here is what I found about the "surrender" idea on Sefaria. The Bechor Shor writes אתה באת להזיקני ולא אשלחך עד שתעשה עמי שלום וברכתני ותודה שאני נצוח: so Yaakov seems to be demanding that the angel concede and admit that Yaakov won. The Tur HaAroch writes," ...


2

Rashi Bereishit 32:21 explains that כפרה literally means wiping away. So in the context of forgiveness as in the verse about Moshe, it means to 'wipe away' sin. In the context of the other verse, it means to wipe away Esav's anger, not to cause Esav to forgive him. Rashi gives examples from the Talmud where it means simply to clean one's hands and has ...


2

Rashi (v. 16) explains: אך אלהים יפדה נפשי. אבל אני שהטיתי למשל אזני, אלהים יפדה נפשי שלא אלך אל שאול כי יקחני בחיי ללכת בדרכיו: “But G-d will redeem my soul” - but I, that I turned my ear to the parable, G-d will redeem my soul; for I will not go to Sheol, for He will take me in my life to go in His ways. In other words: while money can’t redeem ...


2

I had the same question when learning Massekhet Avoda Zara. How can one understand such a strong desire to worship idols? Who today has an urge to bow to statues? The closest I could get to understand it is the gemara in Yoma 69b (and a parallel passage in Sanhedrin 64a) that juxtaposes the yetzer hara for idol worship to the yetzer hara for forbidden ...


2

My teacher said it is imperative to periodically learn a new commentary on the Siddur in order to find new meaning in the old words. May I recommend this? It helped me personally. And there are dozens of more options.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible