10

The largest cluster of lessons is 67. This occurs in a section of commentary covering the large majority of the book of II Samuel. Now for some more details: We have commentaries from Gersonides on the Scriptural books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, Job, Proverbs, Ruth,...


9

A friend of mine compiled the following list: This edition: https://beta.hebrewbooks.org/14118 has Efodi, Shem Tov ibn Shem Tov, ibn Crescas, and Abarbanel. This: https://beta.hebrewbooks.org/31594 is the commentary of R. Moshe Narboni. This is the commentary of R. Shem Tov ibn Falaquera: https://beta.hebrewbooks.org/23920. Two commentaries by R. Yosef ...


7

Hidabroot (here) writes It is a well-known fact that Rabbi Yaakov [Ben Asher, the Baal Haturim] wrote his entire commentary on the Torah in one night, orally, although no reliable source has been found. which is what you might have heard, although they don't connect it to his wedding night. Thanks to @msh210, I found an official source in the ...


7

R. David Conforte identifies (Korei Hadorot 28a) the author of Megillat Esther as R. Isaac de Leon, a student of R. Isaac Kampaton. R. Hayyim Joseph David Azulai, however, (Shem Hagedolim Vol. I entry 333 for the letter Yod) raised several arguments against this identification and concluded that the author of Megillat Esther was R. Isaac Leon (where Leon ...


6

It's in נוסחת הריב"ן on the side of the page in Nazir there, near the end of note Vov (referenced within the text of the Rashi). Here's what it looks like in the Vilna Shas, with the relevant parts highlighted:


6

Rav Berachos (Ben Ish Chai) – והנה ודאי כי האשה הלוקחת צורתה על ידי המאכינה כנז״ל ועושים ולוקחים צורתה על כמה ניירות ומחלקים אותם לכמה בני אדם הנה הם מכשילים הרבים כי הצורה הזאת הולכת ממקום למקום ומעיר לעיר וממדינה למדינה ועיני הכל שולטות בה בין אותם שהם בני ברית ובין שאינם בני ברית וגם כל טמא לנפש והכל מסתכלים בה ובאים להרהורים לא טובים כי היצר מכשילן להביט ...


5

Old French was simply the vernacular language of the great -perhaps the greatest- commentator of the Torah, RASHI, who lived in Troyes, France in the 12 th century CE. His most acknowledged skill was his capacity to explain each word, each sentence of Torah with a superior, yet unrivaled clarity.


4

R. Abraham Viterbo deals with this in Ma'amar Chamishi of Sefer Emunat Chachamim (bottom of page 40a). He begins by mentioning the idea that dark skin was a result of Noah's curse to Canaan. In that case, he says, we would have to assume that all the physiological differences between people of different skin colors occurred at the time of Noah's curse, and ...


3

According to Sefaria.org, it's brought in Zohar 2:20b (on Parashat Shemot): וְהַיְינוּ דְּרִבִּי אֶלְעָזָר, כַּד הֲוָה יָתִיב בְּתַעֲנִיתָא, הֲוָה מְצַלֵּי וְאָמַר, גָּלוּי וְיָדוּעַ לְפָנְיךָ ה' אֱלהַי וִאלהֵי אֲבוֹתַי, שֶׁהִקְרַבְתִּי לְפָנֶיךָ חֶלְבִּי וְדָמִי, וְהִרְתַּחְתִּי אוֹתָם בַּחֲמִימוּת חוּלְשַׁת גּוּפִי, יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ, שֶׁיְּהֵא ...


3

The Malbim in his Yair Ohr explains the difference between the 3 words שונא,אויב,צר. A שונא = a person(enemy) who hates someone in their heart only. A אויב = a person(enemy) who doesnt inflict harm personally for his name sake,but is happy when someone else does it. A צר = a person(enemy) who inflicts bad on others with their actions. It seems from this ...


3

According to this Wikipedia article: https://he.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/פירוש_רש%22י_לתורה (Under ״מפרשי רש׳י) The writer of ikar siftei Chachamim is anonymous, but it was first printed in Vilna (widow and brothers Romm) printing press in 5635 (1874/ 1875).


3

Yom Hazikaron. That's a pretty "obvious" one. It's all over the Siddur.


3

The three lands being referred to at that time (17th century) were Poland, Lithuania and Royal Prussia. These were the territories occupied by the western Slavic peoples. This introduction was written pre-Chilmienicki Poland and was a state called the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth which was formed through the Treaty of Lublin. It was considered a time of ...


3

Maimonides writes in the Introduction to Mishneh Torah that the Babylonian Talmud is authoritative because it contains the rulings of all (or at least a majority) of the Sages of the time, and its rulings were accepted by all Israel.


3

The gloves didn't just come off, Korach's punishment was already setup on the first Erev Shabbos as per Pikey Avos. פי הארץ - לבלוע קורח ועדתו Korach was different in that it wasn't just another sin, it was an attempted revolution to split the nation. It was the first of its kind so it was met with a harsh blow prepared for in advance.


3

This question can be answered based on Rashi's understanding of Bamidbar 14:36, which addresses a similar question: Why didn't Moshe's prayer help the Spies as it helped the entire Jewish people when Hashem wanted to "strike them with pestilence and disown them"? Bamidbar 14:36 וְהָ֣אֲנָשִׁ֔ים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַ֥ח מֹשֶׁ֖ה לָת֣וּר אֶת־הָאָ֑רֶץ ...


2

Here is a partial source, from זוהר ח"א סז ע"ב comparing Noah negatively with Moshe, who prayed for his generation: תא חזי מה בין משה לשאר בני עלמא. בשעתא דאמר לה קודשא בריך הוא למשה 'ועתה הניחה לי' וגו' 'ואעשה אותך לגוי גדול' וגו', מיד אמר משה: וכי אשבוק דינהון דישראל בגיני? השתא יימרון כל אינון בני עלמא דאנא קטלית לון לישראל, כמה דעבד נח. דכיוון ...


2

The commentaries I've come across all seem to agree that Zerubavel was indeed the biological son of Pedaya. A number of approaches are offered to explain why he is nonetheless referred to as the son of Shealtiel: Radak to Divrei HaYamim I 3:18-19 understands that Pedaya was a son of Shealtiel, such that Zerubavel was a grandson of Shealtiel. Zerubavel is ...


2

Rashi writes (Bamidbar 15:38) ועשו להם ציצת THAT THEY MAKE THEM A FRINGE — It is called צצית, because of the threads that hang down from it. Similar is, (Ezekiel 7:3) “and he caught me by the curls (ציצת) of my head’’. (The word denotes something twisted as threads or curls). — Another explanation is: it is called ציצת because of the command associated with ...


2

See "The Rav Thinking Aloud" pg. 233 where it quotes a transcript of a dialogue with Rav J.B. Soloveitchik: "...if you study the parshios of Avraham properly, you'll find out there are two brisos. One Bris is a combination of Hakadosh Baruch Hu, Avraham, and the aretz; and then a second bris for Eretz Yisrael…" in the footnote 59* (by r' David Holzer, the ...


2

Aside from the above answers, a couple of considerations: Chazal tell us לעולם ישנה אדם לתלמידו דרך קצרה, a person should teach his students using the most economical language. It's a lot shorter to say "tamei" than "may not enter the Beis Hamikdash or eat kodshim," and the same for "tahor." At least when it comes to taharah, saying "he may enter the BHMK ...


2

At the end of each day, make a cheshbon hanefesh (an accounting of the soul). Go through the day, looking at the decisions and emotional responses you had that day. Look at which middos (emotional capacities) tended to get triggered. Were the decisions from a place of anavah -- an honest assessment of self-worth, without needing to make the story about me? ...


2

Many quotations in the book of Psalms use characteristic poetic styles to convey its messages. The psalm you mention uses the Synthetic Parallelism in which the psalmist parallels words/themes/ideas in the first clause with other words/themes/ideas in the second clause, also completing and adding an intended effect of an existed cause in the previous clause. ...


1

The rabbis held that the words ממחרת השבת ("the day after the Shabbat") referred to the day after the holiday, not the day after Saturday. The proof for this is (as given by Rabbi Yosi on Menachot 66a) is that if Shabbat refers to Saturday, you don't know which Saturday in the year it is. As I understand it, the question on this is essentially: why do we ...


1

Rabbi Matityahu Clark, in expanding on the Hirschian system of phonemic cognates, discusses (see Appendix B) phonemic class E30, which I would summarize as a collection of triliteral roots where the first letter is a sibilant, the second letter is resh, and the third letter is a guttural. This is what NJM referred to in his/her answer. Here is a picture of ...


1

Rav Hirsch explains in his commentary on Chumash (Vayikra 13:2) that "צרע is inner rot which breaks out externally while נגע strikes externally, זרה is throw away and remove, and זרא means to throw up." Seemingly, the connected root of these words refer to projecting something externally. Therefore, זרוע is an outstretched arm while צרוע is the inner rot ...


1

Because the elders preserve Israel and are sought for their wisdom. Rabbi Akiva said: Why is Israel compared to a bird? Just as a bird can only fly with its wings, so Israel can only survive with the help of its elders. [Ex. R. 5:12] Rabbi Yehudah said they are owed respect even after they lose their faculties: Be careful [to respect] an old man who ...


1

The term awful (aweful is a misspelling) is actually used in both senses only in modern day English. Originally it was restricted to the meaning filling with awe which is the meaning for נורא Thus, it is not a negative or pejorative meaning. For example Oppressing with fear or horror; appalling, terrible. Inspiring awe; filling with profound ...


1

Micah 5:1 is translated as וְאַתָּ֞ה בֵּֽית־לֶ֣חֶם אֶפְרָ֗תָה צָעִיר֙ לִֽהְיוֹת֙ בְּאַלְפֵ֣י יְהוּדָ֔ה מִמְּךָ֙ לִ֣י יֵצֵ֔א לִֽהְי֥וֹת מוֹשֵׁ֖ל בְּיִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וּמוֹצָֽאֹתָ֥יו מִקֶּ֖דֶם מִימֵ֥י עוֹלָֽם: And you, Bethlehem Ephrathah-you should have been the lowest of the clans of Judah-from you [he] shall emerge for Me, to be a ruler over ...


1

Rashi comments: What does the repetition of this word וירא imply? The first time it has its ordinary meaning (“he looked”), the second that of understanding: he saw that they were standing in one spot, and so understood that they had no desire to cause him any trouble ... he, therefore, took the initiative and ran towards them. (Silbermann ...


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