12

The Chavos Yair Siman 16 at the end of the tshuva writes that the coins from Sweden which had the Shem HaShem on it are not considered kodesh since it was made for mundane purposes and the *Mishna Brurah 334:52 quotes this opinion concerning melting down the coin(erasing the name). It seems that the name on the seal has no kedusha just the fact its on the ...


12

My father, who works at Columbia received a psak that the University branded calendars and such require geniza because of the logo on the cover. Presumably this would imply it is forbidden to walk on the Name on the library floor. Source: Rabbi Dovid Goldwasser PS I've now identified myself to anyone who knows me already.


7

Machon Lev in Jerusalem is one such option The Jerusalem College of Technology (JCT) – Lev Academic Center is the second largest academic institution in Jerusalem. It is fully accredited by Israel’s Council of Higher Education and specializes in high-tech engineering, computer science, industrial management and health sciences combined with a ...


6

R. Moshe Feinstein has a responsum about cheating. He was asked by someone who had heard that in yeshivot they allow the students to steal the answers for the Regents. R. Moshe answered that it is absolutely forbidden. Not only is it geneivat da'at (deception), it is also geneivat mamon (outright monetary theft) because when someone applies for a job they ...


6

The SAT seems somewhat analagous to voting: Voting is a civic duty and how we contribute to governance; taking the SAT is required to get into most colleges. Both elections and the SAT are administered by some other organization; the location used is just a location, not a sponsor. Choices are very limited. For voting you have to either use your assigned ...


6

This doesn't exactly answer the question (the other answers seemed satisfactory), but I thought this might be useful - a map of kosher meal plan/food options on every college in North America: theheart2heartproject.org/koshermap Some are through Chabad, some are through Hillel, although the majority are through the university's dining services.


5

It is a sin, and it's basically a form of theft. After doing some research, I found out the Guemara brings the concept of Gneivas Da'as, which is the theft of intellect. This site explains very well this concept.


5

Rutgers University offers the following courses for free: The Bible and History Israeli Political System Introduction to Rabbinic Literature History of Zionism Jews Under Islam The Inquisition and the Jews In addition, several Israeli universities offer Jewish related courses on Coursera. Such as: The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem - Tel Aviv University ...


5

from my experience, I have found 3 solutions: cook it yourself (assuming you can get raw ingredients that are kosher) get your food service people to buy you kosher airplane meals and keep them on campus, and heat them up for you at meal hours (I did this for a semester, until I convinced them to let me take the meals back to my dorm so I could heat them up ...


5

Bar Ilan offers the option of combining beit midrash for part of the day and university courses the rest of the day: http://mgl.org.il/


5

You can maintain such an academic schedule while learning in a semicha program (rabbinic ordination) at*: Yeshiva University; Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) Kollel L'Horaah Ohr Reuven Yeshiva Torah Vodaath Among others which I'll add as I recall


4

Our views towards donating one's body for medical studies aren't so simple. But if the body is already here, and the medical student is expected to dissect a cadaver as part of their medical education (let's assume the student is not a kohen), Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik is quoted as saying that it is wholly appropriate -- "would you go to a doctor who's never ...


4

I believe you are referring to the responsum of R. Elchonon Wasserman to a young R. Shimon Schwab. It can be found at the end of Kovetz He'arot (#11) as well as in Kovetz Shiurim vol. II #47. (Parenthetically, see the beginning of this article by Dr. J. J. Schachter (and especially endnote 2) which discusses the circumstances surrounding this responsum, and ...


4

Rav Moshe Feinstein was asked in his Igros YD 4:34 from a Rosh Yeshiva if he should allow his talmidim to go to college in the summer. Rav Moshe answered (in June 1972) that talmidim going to college in the first place isnt so simple ,but he said we shouldnt protest because of pressure from parents and they wouldnt listen anyhow. With regards to the actual ...


4

I remember Rav Aviner was asked a very similar question. He answers at the bottom of this page. To quote him Question: I heard that it is permissible to cheat, since it isn't "Genevat Da'at" (deception), as the teachers know that cheating occurs, and it would be "a decree that the community cannot live up to [and which therefore is not binding]." ...


4

You can check out Ohr Yisroel in Brooklyn. You can get Semicha and an MBA under one roof.


4

I've attended an interesting lecture in my boys' school in Jerusalem (I think) and the (frum) lecturer presented a very interesting approach to what you ask. This topic is actually overhyped in Judaism, with Rabbis artificially provoking people's (especially young ones) urges with talks on the severity of lust, actually causing the problem. The solution, ...


3

The following is admittedly a weak and Aggadic answer. I've got a hammer, and if you squint right at this question, it looks kinda like a nail. I strongly suspect that a better answer could be found in actual Halachic sources. An essential difference between a community and an individual is that the community is "eternal," while individuals' lives are ...


3

The Grandma meal plan: Ask your grandmother if she could cook and freeze some kosher food that you could pick up next time you visit. Lots of grandmas derive pleasure from feeding their grandkids. Campus food services: Ask your campus food services department if they'll bring in kosher meals. Many will: perhaps frozen double-wrapped oven-reheatable ...


3

See Rabbi Torczyner's lecture on attending conferences. If I understood and recall his lecture correctly: Generally speaking, where necessary it would be permissible — assuming that the speaker would be using the same electronic devices regardless of your presence. (Rabbi Torczyner always starts with "ask your local synagogue rabbi for actual psak",...


3

you've come to the right place. More on the subject here, but in short: If someone is a [male] Kohen, they're prohibited from any additional contact with the dead -- thus it's problematic for a Kohen to handle cadavers. (If you have no particular reason to believe someone is a Kohen, we generally don't worry about it.) Other than that, today we're not ...


3

I can answer some of the question but not the real halachic bit. This sounds just like the Cambridge graduation ceremony. It is quite common and I think officially accepted for people there who don't want to kneel to just go and stand and lean forwards instead. It may be common practice among Jewish students in your place to make use of this kind of ...


2

I can't promise this will work, but here's a guide I wrote to help students advocate for kosher food on campus with the university: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Kw10aYHUUPW4dUJqKcYpjWNDSb22wXjF56ZLt5FvroY/edit# Some of the other answers here are also included, but if feasible, getting the university to add kosher food would be so much more simple, ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah siman 157 siff two discusses some of your suggestions. See especially the end of the Ramma which would seemingly rule that any possible leniency of wearing clothes without any verbal proclamation would not apply being that this is not a time of gzeira but rather just a financial interest. אסור לאדם לומר שהוא עובד כוכבי' כדי ...


2

Below is an excerpt from a letter of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (written originally in English) that discuss attending college; I hope you find this useful. From a letter of 1 Adar 5722 "Theoretically a college and its faculty should not try to impose any particular views, much less a way of life, on the students. Actually however, the student cannot help ...


2

Among other requirements, semicha from Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, an affiliate of Yeshiva University, requires two years of Talmud study. If a person studied in Israel for two (or more) years, his last year of undergraduate Talmud can also count as one of the years of Talmud for semicha. So in a sense, he is receiving credit towards semicha....


2

I would like to add to the excellent answer by Gabe12, that even if no specific ruling can be found that cheating on a test is avelut, it does not really matter. It still goes against the principle of Kedoshim tihiyu (And you shall be Holy). Just because something does not seem expressely prohibited does not mean that it is permitted. The commentary by ...


2

This opinion of Rav Shach is undoubtedly stemming from the Bartenura in Sanhedrin in the beginning of Chelek. He say included in sefarim chitzonim are history books of nations who are idol worshipers. בספרים החיצונים. ספרי מינים, כגון ספרי אריסט״ו היוני וחביריו. ובכלל זה הקורא בספר דברי הימים של מלכי נכרים ובשירים של עגבים ודברי חשק שאין בהם חכמה ולא ...


1

I will only touch on a few of the myriad challenges (I hesitate to label them problems). These depend on the specific school and the accommodations it makes for Jewish students, and the student and what he can deal with. Basically, in every area of life (as halacha is pervasive and touches on all aspects of life) college presents alternatives, many of which ...


1

the Rambam writes in hilchot deot ch. 6 It is natural for a man's character and actions to be influenced by his friends and associates and for him to follow the local norms of behavior. Therefore, he should associate with the righteous and be constantly in the company of the wise, so as to learn from their deeds. Conversely, he should keep away ...


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