25

From Rav Aviner's tshuvot (text) Wearing Wife's Jacket in the Cold Q: Is it permissible for a husband to wear his wife's jacket if he is cold, or is it forbidden on account of "Lo Yilbash" (the prohibition of cross-dressing)? And what about visa-versa? A: It is permissible, since the purpose is not to wear it but simply to warm up (Shut ...


19

You are a very responsible and respectful person for inquiring about whether wearing your current clothes would be disrespectful or not to the synagogue. I really have to hand it to you, not everyone is that respectful. It depends on what day of the week you plan on visiting to the synagogue. If you're planning on visiting during a weekday, then your normal ...


18

Shulkhan Arukh, OC 10:10 explicitly rules that a turban is exempt from tzitzit, even if it covers the majority of the wearer's body. מִצְנֶפֶת פְּטוּרָה, אֲפִלּוּ שֶׁל אַרְצוֹת הַמַּעֲרָב שֶׁב' רָאשֶׁיהָ מֻשְׁלָכִים עַל כִּתְפֵיהֶם וְגוּפָם, וְאַף עַל פִּי שֶׁמִּתְכַּסֶה בָּהּ רֹאשׁוֹ וְרֻבּוֹ פָּטוּר, כֵּיוָן שֶׁעִקָּרָהּ לְכַסוֹת הָרֹאשׁ, דִּכְסוּתְךָ ...


17

Per Rabbi David Sperling it is not problematic to own or use a Swiss gear bag. The use of the cross - which is of course a Christian symbol - is widely discussed in halacha. When the cross is one that people bow to, or use in their worship, then there are serious halachic problems with owning such an item. However, when the cross is clearly not for ...


15

The Chinuch says in Mitzvah #443 in reference to the prohibition of men wearing women's clothing: "ונוהג איסור זה בכל מקום ובכל זמן-This prohibition applies in all places, and at all times." So, it seems pretty clear that it's not allowed in any sort of setting. In general, you should know, that the mitzvot apply equally in public and private. For example,...


15

The Gemara (Yoma 78b) writes that one who sleeps with shoes on, 'has tasted a taste of death', and since tasting death is probably not a good thing, some poskim write that sleeping with shoes on should be avoided (see Kaf Hahayyim Y.D 116:211, for example). The book Shemiras Haguf Vehanefesh (no. 115) also writes that wearing shoes to sleep causes someone to ...


14

There is a Jewish practice to tear one's clothes when in mourning. In recent times, it has become common for non-Orthodox Jews to tear a black ribbon pinned to their clothes rather than the clothes themselves in order to avoid damaging an article of clothing. I am not sure whether using the ribbon satisfactorily fulfills the obligation according to the ...


13

Rav Yosef Messas a"h (he served as Rav in Tilimsan Algeria, Meknes Morocco, and as Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Haifa) held that wearing costumes/disguises on Purim is absolutely forbidden as hukas hagoyim and that its origins stem from an imitation of the pre-Lent festivity of Carnavale which itself has origins in the orgiastic paganism of Bacchanalia. He ...


13

Shmiras Shabbas Ke'Hilchasa (18:44) writes that one may walk into a Reshus HaRabbim with an identification label that is sewn or stuck to one's garment.


13

Although the real answer to your question would be found in the Double AA's answer, it's worth noting that there was at least one authority who did believe that pisuk raglayim was an issue for men as well, albeit not as big an issue as for women. The Chazon Ish felt that wearing a long jacket was proper for exactly this issue. In fact he would wear an extra ...


13

Excrement and urine of a live animal (and in fact anything except an entire limb from a live animal) are not ritually impure, and thus don't affect your hat. (Rambam Avot HaTumah 2:3) As an aside, excrement and urine of a deceased animal (as opposed to its flesh) also are not ritually impure. (ibid. 1:15)


12

This article summarizes the rules of dress for both men and women required for saying brachot. There are footnotes to sources, as well. Excerpts: Another aspect of “holiness” when saying a bracha is that a man is required to have a “separation between his heart and his lower body.” This typically requires no special attention, as it is accomplished by ...


12

Rambam, Hilchot Klei HaMikdash 8:5: כָּל בֶּגֶד מִבִּגְדֵי כְּהֻנָּה שֶׁנַּעֲשׂוּ צוֹאִין אֵין מְלַבְּנִין אוֹתָן וְאֵין מְכַבְּסִין אוֹתָן אֶלָּא מַנִּיחָן לִפְתִילוֹת וְלוֹבֵשׁ חֲדָשִׁים. וּבִגְדֵי כֹּהֵן גָּדוֹל שֶׁבָּלוּ גּוֹנְזִין אוֹתָן. וּבִגְדֵי לָבָן שֶׁעוֹבֵד בָּהֶם בְּיוֹם הַצּוֹם אֵינוֹ עוֹבֵד בָּהֶם פַּעַם שְׁנִיָּה לְעוֹלָם אֶלָּא ...


11

The Talmud (Yoma 73b) lists the five obligatory "afflictions" (i.e. forbidden pleasures) of Yom Kippur: Eating and drinking Bathing Anointing Wearing shoes Marital relations Maimonides, in his commentary on the Mishna, summarizes the Talmudic discussion saying: The Torah does not explicitly state the requirement to abstain from these things on the fast ...


11

The Mishna Brurah 610:16 says women customarily wear white and clean clothes. Not sure what people do today.


10

Iggros Moshe Even Haezer 1:69 applies the prohibition of seeing immodestly dressed women/men to seeing inappropriate behavior, with the reasoning that the problem is the thought process it instigates. Based on this logic he applies it to images in films, and even reading about inappropriate activity in books. So if these drawn images conjure up ...


10

This did not start with the post Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel. Nor did it start with Ovadia Yosef. Rabbis throughout the orient wore this type of garb regularly, as their dress reflected the culture they were in. So for example, you have Rabbi Aharon Ben Simeon, former Chief Rabbi of Egypt (until 1921 i believe) The mantle of the Chief Sephardic Rabbi of ...


10

A kippah is not a sacred garment. (The Star-K had found people putting worn-out kippahs in a disposal box intended for worn-out scrolls, which must be buried. So they had to mention that a worn-out kippah may be thrown in the trash!) A kippah is a hat. If you feel like cutting it, go right ahead. Practically I don't know how the edges will then look, but ...


10

I've never used them, but friends of mine have ordered from https://www.yeshivishhats.com/. The home page says that their price is $55.


10

R. Moshe Feinstein has a responsum (Igrot Moshe Y.D. 2:77) with the following question from R. Avraham Chaim Levin: הנה במקום שיש אחרים רואין אם יש דיני הרחקות באשתו נדה שמסתפק כתר"ה דאולי יש להתיר משום דאז אין בו רעיון של קירוב וגם שבא מזה לידי בזיון להאשה ויש בזה משום כבוד הבריות Behold, in a place where there are others watching, do the laws of ...


9

The Shach on Shulchan Aruch 178:1 (s.k. 3) says וצבע השחור הוא דרך צניעות והכנעה וכדאמרינן מי שיצרו מתגבר עליו ילבש שחורים ויתעטף שחורים Not clear if he's talking about men or women or both. But he's commenting on the Rema saying not to wear red, which it's reasonable to suggest is probably at least aimed at women as well, I'm not sure how many men would ...


9

Shaalos U'Tshuvos Minchas Yitzchak 4:60, Ben Ish Chai Parshas Vayishlach 1:17, Halichos Shlomo 13:26, mention putting on the Yarmulke first when finishing to bathe. Halichos Shlomo also mentions leaving on the Yarmulke until all the clothing is removed. צרוך ללבוש הכיפה בראשונה מיד כשבא למקומו לפני כל מלבישיו ולסלקו מראשו לאחר גמר פשיטת כל מלבושיו


9

First of all, to clarify what the question is/should be, there's no obligation to wear tzitzis under normal circumstances, unless one is wearing a four cornered garment. Hence, the fact that tzitzis aren't in the list of clothing is not a problem; they aren't commanded in wearing an extra garment to put on tzitzis, just as no Jew is obligated (strictly ...


9

Hassidim generally wear three types of shirts: A regular white dress shirt. As above, but with reversed buttoning, i.e. right-over-left. Pocket remains on left side of the chest. Basically identical to women's dress shirts, save for the bust shape. A "rebbishe" shirt with three or four differences from the above: 1. The sleeves have no cuff, but instead ...


9

Rabbi Menashe Klein Zatzal in Mishna Halachos 13:3 in discussing shoes with a zipper concludes that it is best to close the zipper in the same order one would tie his shoes. I would conclude from this that velcro would also be the same.


9

It seems to me that the answer to your question is that a man's spreading his legs is not as suggestive a position as the posture isn't reminiscent of intercourse (where a woman's spreading her legs is more...ergonomic). Indeed the phrase פישוק רגליים "spreading the legs" comes from Ezekiel 16:25 where the context and commentaries are clear that what is ...


9

Shulchan Arukh YD 340:14 על כל המתים אם בא להחליף תוך ז' ימים מחליף ואינו קורע על אביו ואמו אם מחליף תוך ז' קורע כל הבגדים שהוא מחליף ואינו מאחה לעולם כמו בפעם הראשון.‏ Upon any [ordinary] death, if [the mourner] comes to change [his clothes] during Shiva, he may switch and not tear [again], [but] on one's father and mother, if he switches [clothes] ...


9

The Targum Yonasan to the verse prohibiting a woman to wear men's gear says specifically it includes Tallis and Tefilin. However, that doesn't seem to be the prevailing opinion. The Aruch HaShulchan and Rav Moshe Feinstein both address the issue of women wearing Tefilin, and neither of them concludes that it's prohibited because of that Targum Yonasan. At ...


8

There is no religious requirement in Judaism for a non-Jewish man to wear a head covering. However, since a public request was made, some attendees might feel that it is disrespectful or insensitive to appear without a head covering. As a practical concern, and out of sensitivity to the family, I would therefore recommend wearing a head covering. Either a ...


8

It seems like the Tifferes Yisroel (Yochin 14) there understands this to mean that the Temple workers were there to take the clothes back from them and return them to storage - and not that they actually physically removed the clothes from their bodies.


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