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19

I was in a jury pool on a winter Friday and told the bailiff that I would need to leave early. The judge brought up the issue publicly and said that she would not want me to miss out on such an important privilege because of my religious requirements. She dismissed the entire pool at 3:00. Needless to say, I was highly popular that day.


15

I just read this super-inspiring post "Jury Duty: A Piece of Kugel". In short, talk to the judge...


13

In the Talmud, it is stated that if you lose something that you know cannot be returned to you (e.g., if a river overflows or if it had no identifiers), even though you know it's yours, you lose all hope of getting it back and therefore, it's as good as gone. If I find something like that, I could safely assume that the owner lost hope of getting it back ...


12

I wrote to Business Halacha Institute and they answered that it is prohibited to do so. As requested, here is the conversation: Aside from the secular law ramifications (illegal in the US): I would be interested in knowing how cell phone jammers fit into halacha, and what the reasons behind forbidding [or permitting] their use would be. Also of ...


12

I asked my local Orthodox rabbi. (FYI: he's Chareidi.) He said that ad-blocking software is permissible to use. He added that even if it's hard for webmasters to detect and work around adblockers, that's no problem for me: some things in life are hard. My rabbi said it was fine for me to post his ruling online. But he asked me not to mention his name ...


11

There's a famous analysis of the two stamp question attributed to R. Chaim Soloveitchik - it's cited here, albeit without any source. Reb Chaim Soloveitchik raised the following question regarding this scenario - there only exists two of a certain type of stamp and they both belong to one individual. Since two of these stamps exist, they are each ...


11

Thanks to Reddit user Bar Kappara (by way of @Isaac Moses) for this answer: Devarim Rabba 3:3: It is told of Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach that he once purchased an ass from an Ishmaelite. When his disciples came, they found a jewel suspended from its neck and said, "Master, 'The blessing of Hashem, it makes rich.'" [Proverbs 10:22] Rabbi Simon ben Shetach ...


11

The difference is discussed extensively in the eighth perek of Ketubot. נכסי מלוג refers to assets that a woman brings into the marriage, or which falls to her as either an inheritance or as a gift after she has married, but which are not included in the value of the ketubah. The word melog comes from the Aramaic מליגה, which means "plucking": her husband ...


10

Rabbi Michael Broyde (a Justice of the Beth Din of America) has a full article of the topic available in English here. He surveys a wide range of opinions from R Eliezer Waldenberg (author of Tzitz Eliezer), who holds that the prohibition of reporting does not apply in a just society, to that of R Moshe Feinstein (author of Igrot Moshe), who holds that the ...


10

Maybe it would be similar to the case of an uncancelled stamp? This page cites R. Menashe Klein zt"l as ruling that you can't reuse the stamp in that case, because of dina d'malchusa. (There is also the famous story of the Chofetz Chaim ripping up stamps when he had letters delivered by courier rather than the postal system, so as not to deprive the ...


10

The Rambam, in Hilchot Nachalot 6:9, rules that: הגוי יורש את אביו, מן התורה; אבל שאר ירושותיהן, מניחין אותן לפי מנהגם A non-Jew inherits his father according to Torah law; however, the for the rest of their inheritances, we leave them according to their customs. The ruling regarding a father to son is based on the Talmud Kiddushin 18a which derives ...


10

I would think that the normal assumption for an employee discount would that it would be for the personal use of the employee and not for his friends and not for him to do business with. I am supported in this by this article about the Original Employee Discount. He quotes: “When you come [to work] in your neighbor’s vineyard, then you may eat the ...


10

There's a whole article by Rabbi Yaacov Feit about this in the Journal of Beth Din of America, vol. I called, unsurprisingly, "The Prohibition Against Going to Secular Courts." It begins: The Torah states (Exodus 21:1), “Ve’eleh ha-mishpatim asher tasim lifneihem,” “And these are the statutes which you shall place before them.” The Talmud (Gittin 88b), ...


10

Tosafot on Sanhedrin 36a s.v. dinei nefashot is bothered by your question as to why we're not concerned that junior judges can't argue on the senior judge in monetary cases. They suggest two possible resolutions: A junior judge is always allowed to argue on the senior judge b'derech she'elah (through asking leading questions, rather than directly ...


10

I understand that this Halacha reflects the economic realities of the Mishna, where pretty much everyone was producing small handicraft and traded them. It could reasonably be assumed that you could sell the black wool as easily as raw wool or red wool, so it has a definite increase in value. While you may not have any interest in dealing with it, the wool ...


9

In those cases, the copyright would apply to the refinements made to the text as a result of the publisher's research. For example, if you want to publish a sefer you cannot just grab the text from the Bar Ilan disk, since they put much effort into correcting the mistakes and expanding the abbreviations, etc. If, however, a publisher is just copying an old ...


9

Let's leave aside the question of whether the concept of "kol demekadesh adaata derbanan hu demekadesh" (weddings are conditional on the agreement of the greater rabbinate) relies on their power to declare things ownerless. 700 years ago, the Rashba (Responsa 1162) asked why the rabbis didn't cancel weddings retroactively in the case of a happily-married ...


9

Rabbi Yair Hoffman has an analysis in the 5 Towns Jewish Times here (hat-tip to VIN for pointing me to it): The article views the question primarily around the issue of Onaah which it defines as 16.7% above or below market value (and possibly just a pricing mistake regardless). If that issue applied, then the sale would be invalid. The conclusion of the ...


9

The Talmud in Bava Kama 91a talks about inducing panic in someone -- "our courts can't charge the person, but Heaven will take him to task." I would assume the same would apply here, at first glance. (I'm not well-read on the halachic literature on the subject.) The classical examples of charging for embarrassment involve physical actions such as spitting ...


8

From Shut Igrot Moshe, Yoreh Deah, Part 2, Siman 10: ... My opinion is that the Katan (Minor?) that caused damage will have to pay when he grows up. Then he says that not everybody agrees to this (and think that he doesn't have to pay even when he grows up) but he couldn't find their opinion in Shulchan Aruch. So the discussion is about the Katan's payment ...


8

Anytime that you purchase something using anything that you claim has value, but in fact is not what it appears, you are guilty of fraud and theft, both of which are Isurei DeOraitha (Biblical prohibitions). It has nothing to do with whether or not the country you are in considers it a felony or a misdemeanor, or even if it is encouraged as an economic ...


8

This is called מציל עצמו בממון חבירו, saving yourself at the expense of someone else's property. Fred is indeed liable to pay Ernie for any damages, even if he was trying to save his own life (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 380:3), and certainly if it was just to save his own property from theft or confiscation (ibid. 292:8 and and 388:2).


8

Halachah distinguishes between two kinds of indirect damages: g'rama, for which one is exempt from court-imposed penalties or repayments (although he is still liable to Heavenly judgment until he makes good the loss); and garmi, for which a court of law can hold him liable. (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 386) What distinguishes g'rama from garmi is ...


8

Encyclopedia Talmudit discusses this question, at the entry "הפקר בית דין," section ד. Some ראשונים hold1, based on the gemara Gittin 36b, that הפקר בית דין can only be done with a בית דין of the caliber of that of רב אמי and רב אסי, and hence it cannot be done today. Others posit that the comparison to רב אמי ורב אסי is not literal, but is really meant ...


8

The sefer Shaarei Daas on Bava Kama says that to destroy one shoe is not considered as damage to the other shoe, for the lack of one shoe does not destroy or maintain the viability of the second shoe. Rather, that one is unable to use the second shoe, but that is not called damage that one is culpable to pay damages for, rather the damager must pay for just ...


8

According to R Tzvi Spitz in his book, Cases in Monetary Halacha, yes you do. He brings the following points Just as there is a mitzvah to return lost objects to their owner, so it is obligatory to save a fellow Jew from incurring a loss of any kind if one is able to do so One acting in this manner has fulfilled a Torah commandment and, conversely, if he ...


8

When you purchase a DVD like you are describing, there is a 'terms of use' agreement, a 'terms and conditions' of sale and multiple copyrights (often in compliance with different jurisdictions around the globe). They all must be agreed to in order to purchase the product legally. There are also follow up warnings of those agreements and conditions that come ...


8

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh De’ah 16:6 writes that as soon as one sells an animal, he may not slaughter its offspring/parent that day, as the sale is done with the intent that the purchaser may slaughter the animal he has bought immediately. שמיד כשמכר לראשון לא היה יכול לשחוט את שנשאר בידו שהלוקח לקח על מנת לשחוט מיד Thus, the first right to slaughter resides ...


7

There are many sources within Judaism that discuss the obligation to give charity, both in the individual and communal level. The principle Torah source on this issue is Devarim 15: (ז) כִּי יִהְיֶה בְךָ אֶבְיוֹן מֵאַחַד אַחֶיךָ בְּאַחַד שְׁעָרֶיךָ בְּאַרְצְךָ אֲשֶׁר יְקֹוָק אֱלֹהֶיךָ נֹתֵן לָךְ לֹא תְאַמֵּץ אֶת לְבָבְךָ וְלֹא תִקְפֹּץ אֶת יָדְךָ ...


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