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8

No, it does not mean that. It is definitely prohibited to hasten the death even of one who is about to die (ShA YD 339:1). One who murders a terminally ill individual doesn't receive statutory punishment by a human court though (Rambam, Laws of Murder 2:8) which is the relevant technicality for your citation.


7

Thank you for asking the question and performing this great action. In his book Mourning in Halacha (pp. 29-46), Rabbi Chaim Binyamin Goldberg has a number of recommendations based on Jewish law which would apply to your visits. It is desirable to explain to the patient that illness in this world is a kindness which the Holy One bestowed for mankind. The ...


6

This happened to me recently so I looked (post facto) for the answer. R David Sperling gives background here The Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh De'ah 66:10) states that human blood, after it has left the body, is forbidden. This is not because the human blood itself is forbidden to us from the Torah, but rather because someone might think mistakenly that it ...


4

This is intended as a supplement to mbloch's answer, which refers and links to a collection of practices and prayers that provides ample material for the chaplain to choose from. Speaking without pastoral experience or particular expertise this area of law and custom, I can suggest which of the prayers listed are likely to be most familiar to all Jews, ...


3

If they do not know the persons mothers name or fathers name the Orchos Rabbeinu 1:218 brings from the Chazon Ish that one can say the persons first and last name. Text:


3

I don't think there's any one recommended prayer, but Psalm 30 is a popular one to say for healing. It concludes "You turned my mourning to dancing", which is the outcome we all hope and pray for here.


2

According to Bechorot 45a, the number of limbs for a woman is a bit more than 248 (either 252 or 253). Therefore, using the 'standard' formulation of saying '248 limbs' would not work for females. Additionally, since there seems to be disputes between different works as to the 'correct' number of limbs for a woman (besides for the dispute in Bechorot, the Ba'...


2

He should do acts of charity and kindness. Better yet, he should assist his parents to perform those acts. See Daniel 4:24: 24: Indeed, O king, may my counsel please you, and with charity you will remove your sin and your iniquity by showing mercy to the poor; perhaps your tranquility will last."


2

Apart from speaking to the sick person, there are other activities involved in Bikkur Cholim that can be fulfilled without interrupting his learning. For example taken from Hidabroot הלכות ביקור חולים טז עיקר מצות ביקור חולים היא לצורכו של החולה, לראות מה יוכל לעשות עבורו, (וכן לעודד את רוחו), ולבקש עליו רחמים....... 16: The idea of Bikkur ...


2

On a theoretical level: For practical applications, talk to a Rabbi who knows Halacha. (Not every Rebbi in a yeshiva qualifies. as you've discovered.) Halacha is full of the concept of במקום צער - when pain is involved. A lot of laws change when pain is involved. Sometimes even mental anguish is sufficient a reason to not be obligated to pray, for example. ...


1

The Poskim (Orach Chaim 219:1, see Mishnah Berurah 219:1) write how one must completely leave the dangerous situation to recite HaGomel. There's much discussion regarding travelers with multiple stops and how it parallels sickness (see Birkei Yosef 219:3 and Maamar Mordechai 219:1, Kaf HaChayim 219:4-5, and Yabia Omer vol.1 Orach Chaim 13). In this case, the ...


1

B'feirush davka Torah. The source for mentioning the name of the individual's mother is King David's entreaty (Psalms 116:16): "Please, O Lord, for I am Your servant; I am Your servant the son of Your maidservant," wherein he specifies his mother (although his father was also a very righteous person). https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/761128/...


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