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possible answer to the question... HKB”H promised that the bais hamikdosh will be the place where all humans will come to pray and he will listen to them even if they don’t bring or are non participants in the sacrifices that’s why it will be called “house of prayer” שלמה המלך ביקש.....כשחינך הביהמ״קדש נא רבש״ע !!!!שמע אל תפילות הבאים להתפלל פה בבית ...


3

The key issue in the question is that by saying the words: וַתַּבְדֵּל ה' אֱלֹקֵינוּ בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְחֹל, בֵּין אוֹר לְחשֶׁךְ, בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה.‏ You have distinguished Hashem, our God between the sacred and the secular, between light and darkness, between Israel and the peoples, ...


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Defining chovas gavra as an obligation on the person to light a candle (potentially only at the person's own doorway - similar to tefilin requiring the person's own arm), and chovas object/cheftza as an obligation on the person to ensure that his doorway has a candle lit, along the lines of mezuza and ma'akeh. It is clear from Shabbos 23a that it is an ...


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In order to answer, it is important to clarify the question. Although it is obvious the Torah only obligates people (objects can have no obligations or restrictions), the question is about the exact classification of the obligation: Is the mitzva a chovas gavra - [which I will define as] an obligation which is not bound to specific circumstances (similar ...


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The light of the Hanukkiah is said to be an extension of the light of the Menorah in the Beit Hamikdash. Therefore one is not allowed to use the light of the Hanukkiah for normal secular matters such as reading or in our times taking a picture. However, our practice is to have an extra light (often called a Shamash by Ashkenazim) to be a source of "secular" ...


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This is the psak of Rav Eliyashiv


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Originally, the mitzva of lighting the Menorah was specifically outdoors. The Gemara (Shabbos 21b) writes that during times of danger, one may light indoors. Numerous answers are given to why today, when we have a right to practice 'Freedom of Religion', many still light indoors. Or Zarua (Chanuka 323), Ittur (2, Aseres Hadibros Hil Chanuka), Shibolei ...


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This article by R David Brofsky addresses (what seems to me to be) an equivalent question: When one goes away for Shabbat, for example, and returns home on Saturday night, where should he light Ḥanukka candles that night? Is his status determined by the place where he slept the night before or the place where he intends to sleep that night? Some suggest ...


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Wikipedia brings the following quote from Rabbi Maimon, father of the Rambam: "אין להקל בשום מנהג ואפילו מנהג קל. ויתחייב כל נכון לו עשות משתה ושמחה ומאכל, לפרסם הנס שעשה השם יתברך עמנו באותם הימים. ופשט המנהג לעשות סופגנין, בערבי אלספינג, והם הצפחיות בדבש, ובתרגום: האיסקריטין, והוא מנהג הקדמונים משום שהם קלויים בשמן, זכר לברכתו" Admittingly, though, he ...


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It seems to have been referred to this way at least as early as the time of Flavius Josephus. See his Antiquities of the Jews, Book 12, Chapter 7: Now Judas celebrated the festival of the restoration of the sacrifices of the temple for eight days, and omitted no sort of pleasures thereon; but he feasted them upon very rich and splendid sacrifices; and he ...


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One possible answer may be from here: "תיכון בית תפילתי" – תבנה את בית המקדש העתידי. (השלישי) שנקרא גם 'בית תפילה'. "אז אגמור בשיר מזמור" – בעת הגאולה אשלים את תפילת ההלל עם חנוכת המזבח." It seems that Tefillah is an inherent part of Beit Hamikdash. If the Mikdash was simply a house of sacrifice, ending the giving of thanks with a Shir Mizmor of ...


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R' Shlomo Kluger (on Shulchan Aruch OC 670) writes that when the Avoidah is not just part of the daily seder, but also an inauguration of the Avoida ('Chinuch'), it requires purity. (See Alex's answer) נראה אפילו למ"ד טומאה הותרה בציבור היינו לגוף העבודה דילפינן (פסחים סו,ב) מאיש נדחה דאין הציבור נדחין, אבל לחנך בתחילה הביהמ"ק ודאי החינוך בתחילה צריך ...


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As explained in a shiur that I attended today, each day of Chanukah is a separate mitzvah. The days of Pesach are considered one mitzvah, while each day of Succos is also a separate mitzvah as we see by the difference korbanos each day.


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Chanuka is definitely a time for happiness and rejoicing. The Rambam (Chanuka Perek 3) writes: ומפני זה התקינו חכמים שבאותו הדור שיהיו שמונת ימים האלו שתחלתן כ"ה בכסלו ימי שמחה והלל As a result, the Sages of the Generation decreed that the eight days beginning with 25th >Kislev shall be days of happiness and praise. A possible source for this ...


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The earliest 2 sources for Chanukah are the talmud in Shabbos 21b and the Al Hanisim prayer. Both of these mention Praise and Thanksgiving, but neither mentions happiness per se. However, it seems clear for another reason that Chanukah is associated with happiness specifically. We recite Hallel, which is an expression of joy. Rambam writes in משנה תורה, ...


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many rule that if a minyan (quorum of ten men for prayer) for afternoon or evening services is held at the public menorah ceremony, then the place would be considered like a synagogue, and one would be able to light with the blessings. Torat ha-Moadim 7:15; Yalkut Yosef Moadim, p. 204; Chikrei Minhagim, vol. 1, p. 205 (original edition). Others, however, ...


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The following explanation was developed by Rabbi Zolly Claman, now of Edmonton, Canada. With a better understanding of Sukkos, perhaps we can get a better understanding of its connection to Chanukah. The eight days of Sukkos consist of the seven days of the festival of Sukkos and conclude with the festival of Shemini Atzeres. During the first seven days, ...


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