14

We never claimed that the recipe originated from the Terumas Hadeshen; that was the article author's own conclusion. What we said in the book was, "As early as the fifteenth century, it is recorded that every Friday evening the Austrian sage Rabbi Israel ben Petahiah Isserlein (1390-1460) welcomed Shabbes with “three fine hallot kneaded with eggs oil, and a ...


14

The Tur (OC 271) here brings three reasons why we cover the challah. 1) To establish that the meal is coming because of the kiddush. The Talmud (Pesachim 100b) quotes a braita that says one shouldn't bring the "table" out until after kiddush because, according to the Shi'iltot (#54), we want to show that the kiddush is defining the meal. Tosafot there ...


12

There is no obligation to eat any food on Shabbat which harms you or is painful, even if that means fasting completely (OC 288:2). I obviously don't know your friend's medical details, but if there is nothing he is allowed to eat then he is simply exempt.


12

Taamei Haminhagim - page 77 - #176 *note on bottom giving a Kabalistic reason, says that it is to be Mevatel tho Koach of the Chitzonim. It seems from his wording that if you take off a small piece of it, you can eat the rest of it.


10

From Rabbi Torczyner: • May I braid challah on Yom Tov? This is actually more complex than it may sound. On the one hand, acts from kneading and onward in the bread-making process are permitted on Yom Tov. On the other hand, the reason we don't braid dough is because it is "construction", and construction is prohibited on Yom Tov. Indeed, Rav Shlomo ...


9

In the sefer Shmiras Haguf Vehanefesh (31:4) by Rav Yitzchok Lerner, Rav Chaim Kanievsky is quoted saying that there is no source for this in the tradional Jewish literature, but if this is ones family minhag he should not change it. See Orchos Rabbeinu 3 page 104, 23 who says that the Steipler zt"l did not eat the end peice. Personally, I have heard from ...


8

Interesting question. It is dealt with at the bottom of this site (the same one you quoted, incidentally). A summary of the answers there: Zugos are only a problem when the entire pair are consumed (four cups of wine), but lechem Mishnah wasn't enacted to eat two entire loaves, just to make hamotzi on them (Rabbi Yisroel Shaw) Some texts of Pesachim 110b ...


8

Taame Haminhagim ("Likutim" (in the back), 183), in my own free translation: The reason for the custom that we make Passover matzas round is according to what Rabbi Saadia and Maimonides wrote, that people at one time believed in multiple gods…. To keep Jews far from such fools' beliefs, they imposed then upon themselves to make all their breads ...


7

I've never heard of the salt representing a preservative. It is, primarily, to represent the salt used for Korbanoth, as the table is representative of the Mizbeaḥ. In fact, I once had a Rav who would specifically not use salt Friday night, as there are no Korbanoth that are meant to be brought on Friday night. Furthermore, according to this Minhag, the ...


7

Curiouser wanted the Kabbalistic reason, so R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi brings two reasons: In Torah Or, he explains that according to Nigla, one should place the breads one on top of the other, since the source of nigla is Hishtalshelus (the G-dly revelation within the worlds coming down in an orderly and progressive manner [Or Yashar]), and placing the ...


7

Great question. I myself have had this question and looked it up, and I found the article Why Do We Dip the Challah Bread in Salt? to be very interesting. To sum up what's written there: It's dipped in salt every time bread is eaten, and not only on Shabbos. The reason is that your table is compared to an altar, and since sacrifices brought on the altar ...


7

The earliest source for having a large Challah at a wedding is the Maasas Binyomin (d. 1620) There is a wide spread custom to distribute slices of the large challa to the friends of the Chosson and Kallah. Some say (Nittei Gavriel quotes Darkei Chaim p27, who heard this from R' Akiva Eiger) that this is based on the famous question posed at every marriage: '...


7

See here in Taame Haminhagim in the notes ובספר לבושי מכלול קו"א כתב בשם ספר א' דסכין חד סגולה לפרנסה דאינו עושה פרורין דקשה לעניות. והנה סופי תיבות של "פותח את ידיך" הוא השם הממונה על הפרנסה, ועל כן טוב לחתוך בסכין חד וחלק:‏ The reason is to avoid crumbs, that is a segula for parnasa, because Chatach is sofe tevot poteach et yadecha, and the shem ...


7

Shulchan Aruch 167:1 rules that during the week one should start to cut the piece he wishes to eat from the loaf before reciting hamotzi. However, one needs to ensure that it remains connected enough so that if he were to lift up the piece, the rest of the loaf would come with it. Mishnah Berurah 167:6 explains that if one were to cut the piece to a greater ...


6

http://revach.net/article.php?id=3830 Shevet HaKehosi (2:114) says that it should be taken out of the bag and L'Chatchila the two Challos should touch.


6

I heard the reason is that in the older days they use to bake the bread in a common oven. So one bread useD to touch the other. So when you eat your bread you maybe also eat a bit of the bread from the other. There is an inyan of "koshe leshichecha" something that can make you forget you learning, is gezel. By not eating the end you're for sure not "gezel" ...


5

The minimum shiur to fulfill the mitzva of eating a seuda on Shabbos is a kezayis O Ch 271 MB [35]. That means that you must have one loaf of at least a kezayit. The second loaf comes for the (separate) obligation of lechem mishneh. ADDITION: The sources quoted by the Shmiras Shabbos Kehilchoso are: Kaf Hachaim 274 sk 8 says that in בית מנוחה או׳ י״ב&...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Sichos Kodesh 5741 vol 3. pg. 408) explains that the meaning of "טיבול" (dipping) here is in a liquid that necessitates washing hands prior such as the Karpas in salt-water, or the Marror in Charoses (that contains wine). However, dipping bread in dry salt is not considered "טיבול". [In that talk, the Rebbe made reference to a Torah ...


5

I'm told someone asked this to Rabbi Moshe Heinemann, who asked to see the pullapart in question -- and then ruled the individual pieces could not be used.


5

In my quick Google search on the same topic yesterday, I came across this article with sources: http://asimplejew.blogspot.com/2007/04/guest-posting-by-talmid-shlissel.html And then this article that argued against the minhag: http://www.alfassa.com/shlissel_challah.pdf


5

Rabbi Chayim Pinchas Scheinberg is paraphrased (in The Radiance of Shabbos by Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen) as saying that, even if one will not cut into the second loaf, he should hold it unwrapped. However, Rabbi Cohen gives no reason for this rule. Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah, chapter 55, footnote 38, also says it should be unwrapped, citing Mishna B'rura [...


5

He can use oat bread which is gluten-free and is biologically unrelated to wheat or barley. Not all poskim consider oats to be hamotzi (that's its own question) so you should mention to your relative to ask his rabbi. As DoubleAA pointed out, he would probably prefer to use oat matza instead of attempting to eat oat-bread.


5

The psak of Shemiras Shabbos KeHilchoso: If one is kovei'a the meal on pas habo'oh bekisnin, for example, cake, then one can use two full cakes for lechem mishneh. שמירת שבת כהלכתה פרק נה סעיף טז: הקובע סעודה על פת הבאה בכיסנין דהיינו עוגה יכול הוא לקחת שתי עוגות שלמות ללחם-משנה ולבצוע עליהן


4

Based on the information provided I think you really only have one option. Ask the host if they have any plain bread. To avoid insulting the host, avoid eating any chocolate during the entire meal. If they do not have any bread, then eat the rest of the meal, and be sure to say a bracha before each item. When you get home, or leave, or you go back to ...


4

I think you can just rely on it being hamotzi for many reasons: It is a chidush of the shulchan aruch in the first place that the category of pas haba b'kisnin is so broad, many rishonim would have made hamotzi even on babka. I didn't listen to the shiur, but I would guess that some might argue that chocolate chip challah is not the same as babka since it ...


4

Rivevos Ephraim 8:117:14 addresses this and says since there is no kiddush we don't cover the challahs.However,the Rambam(reasoning of the Tur )holds one does make kiddush. The Aruch Hashulchan 291:10.we are noheg not to cover them. The Ben Ish Chai Shana Beit Chayei Sarah 12 holds one has to cover the bread just like the night and day meal even though ...


4

Rabbi Shmuel Kamenetsky in his Sefer Kovetz Halachos writes that one may use a frozen Challa for Lechem Mishna. Furthermore he writes one may use a Challa that is not Pas Yisrael for the second Challa even if he is Makpid on Pas Yisrael. (Do not have the Sefer in front of me now. I will add in the exact location when I have the Sefer) Tzitz Eliezer 14:40 ...


4

In our house (and also growing up) the end piece was left over because people like the softer middle slices of the challah (also, sliced rye). (Which reminds me, l'havdil, of the Rav Moshe story where he was asked about his custom to hunch - he had trouble standing straight.)


4

The source for cutting into the bread before making the blessing is in order to minimize the appearance of interruption between the blessing and the eating (S.A. O.C. 167:1 with Magen Avrohom 3). This cut should be made such that it is not deep enough that were you to lift the smaller part the larger part would not come up with it (ibid). However, that is ...


4

from Menachem Mendel: The earliest apparent source for using the term ḥallah in connection with the bread that is eaten on Shabbat can be found in the 15th c. German work Leket Yosher (p. 49) [See John Cooper’s Eat and Be Satisfied: A Social History of Jewish Food]: וזכורני שבכל ע”ש עושין לו ג’ חלות דקות הנילושות בביצים ושמן ומעט מים. וחלה ...


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