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As pointed out by @Noach in the chat, the Chabad minhag is to say only one beracha on tefilin. That is they say the beracha of lihaniach tefilin before tightening the tefilin shel yad, and no beracha on the tefilin shel rosh, unless one spoke or otherwise interrupted between the one tefila and the other. (This is also the Sefardic minhag. The Ashkenazi ...


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This was published in 1990. Aside from the two compilations directly from the Rebbe which both carried the title ספר השליחות, this was the first such publication from Kehot.


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Possibly Nesivim Bisdeh Hashlichus, by Dayan Levi Yitzchak Raskin of the London Beth Din.


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The Chabad rabbis I've met go out of their way to welcome people in. They also have to know that for the Reform movement in particular with their stance on patrilineal descent, there is a non-trivial chance of issues with the halachic status of non-Orthodox Jews. I'm a member of a Reform congregation and when I had to make last-minute seder plans one year, ...


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I have heard that many hasidic groups study Tanya. In fact, in 1983 there was a famous incident in which an esteemed Lubavitch teacher, Rabbi Pinchas Korf, was teaching Tanya to Satmar students, but some in the Satmar establishment wanted the students to learn it only from Satmar teachers.


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Maybe similar to the Chofetz Chaim's practices: "I noticed that whenever the Chofetz Chaim saw a fly or some other pest that he wanted to chase away he would hold the corner of his tallis or his handkerchief, but he would never use his bare hands. Also he never touched his face with his hands. "For many years I could not understand the reason ...


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The notion that Tamid also concludes with the same ending was mentioned by a handful of authors. One of them, the prolific R. Reuven Margolios (Nitzoze Ohr, Yevamos, end), explains that Tamid isn’t included with the four others since it was redacted at a later time. Others explain that the said closing isn’t the very last statement of the Tractate. Two ...


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My advice is to find some rabbi or neighbors you trust and ask them what sort of hat they buy, and where they buy it. If you want to blend in, that is.


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Historically Lithuanian Jews followed Chaiya Adam until fairly recently. Polish Jews followed the SA HaRav. The MB gained halachic reign sometime after 1980. Ask anyone over 40 who is ffb what they learned halacha from as a teen. We are not bound to follow the MB even though he is one of the greatest commentaries to SA OH and aside for halacha kBasrei.


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The Tanya uses the word rasha and beinoni in different ways than most of us. When this is understood, it becomes clearer that the Tanya actually is a manual for how to become a beinoni. In the language of the Tanya, the beinoni is at a very high level but a realistic target (from this introduction to Tanya) a person who exercises complete self-control ...


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I believe they typically have multiple Tefillin bags at their booths for different head sizes and they are quite good at adjusting the knot on the shel rosh if needed. I believe they put Tefillin on people based on the Shulchan Aruch Harav and am not aware of any heter kiruv on this point that they hold by.


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My suggestion is to dress consistently which means to not mix different styles of different groups. You can learn what this means by speaking to your Rabbi but here are some examples. Each group has its own style for every cloth, for example, a black hat doesn't fit shorts or colored shirt, and a baseball cap doesn't fit a long black coat, and a Sthreiml ...


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There is some amount of space between the hairline as the forward most boundary and the fontanelle as the back boundary. It is presumably possible to size tefillin such that they will be in this range on most people, closer to the hairline on small heads, closer to the fontanelle on large ones. On my own head, it feels as if I can just barely fit 4 fingers ...


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