7

There is no problem to go to non-Jewish cemeteries, and it is even encouraged on fast days (as a reminder of our mortality) if there is no nearby Jewish cemetery. Per this answer, prayers should not be said if there are prominent non-Jewish religious symbols around the grave.


6

Eduyot 5:6: שֶׁכָּל הַמִּתְנַדֶּה וּמֵת בְּנִדּוּיוֹ סוֹקְלִין אֶת אֲרוֹנוֹ Anyone who dies in a state of excommunication, we stone his coffin


6

It has been said that a Jew may visit the graves of righteous gentiles to arouse one to do Teshuvah when the graves of Jews are not available in one’s vicinity, but if the cemetery you wish to enter contains statues of idols (such as Christian crosses, etc.) then you should not enter such a cemetery let alone pray or learn there. M”B 579:14; Kaf Hachaim ...


5

The rules of disinterment are quite strict (see SA YD 363:1), dinonline has a good summary. The case you ask about is not part of the list, nor are there any cases of pressuring a family member. A beit din would have to be asked but the "burden of proof" appears much higher than a delayed burial. Several exceptions to the prohibition are mentioned by the ...


2

This much is definitely true: The chevra kadisha Prushim in Jerusalem does not allow a son to carry the body of his father from the funeral home to the hearse nor from the hearse to the grave. I read about it in this article and experienced it first hand. The explanation there is: descendants of a male deceased will not participate in the funeral ...


1

The Sifte Kohen (YD beg. §371) quotes the Rokeach saying that the wife of a Kohen may enter under the same “roof” as a corpse since there is a double-doubt: the newborn may be a stillborn and, even if it is not, it may be a female. The question was posed to Radbaz (§200): Why is such reasoning necessary, this is a case of tumah balu’ah? Radbaz therefore ...


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