27

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. (Some places use electric "candles"; others use wax. I prefer the wax, though it is a bit more dangerous, smelly, and messy.) It has nothing to do with ...


13

This microfilm copy of the New York Times special millennium edition (dated January 1, 2100, actually published January 1, 2000) shows the Shabbat candle lighting times entry that you refer to. It is found in the lower left corner. The actual text of it says: JEWISH WOMEN/GIRLS LIGHT SHABBAT candles today 18 minutes before sunset In New York 4:39 ...


10

You are essentially correct. There is a blessing to be said when you see fire on Saturday night. It is essentially entirely independent of Havdalah. If you're making Havdalah anyway (99% of cases) then the custom is to say that blessing at that time to give it honor (or something like that). But if you don't have fire available that certainly doesn't ...


9

Men and women are both obligated in the Mitzva of Shabbat candles and saying the blessing. Women have precedence to ensure the Mitzva is fulfilled because they are more often at home preparing the house on Friday afternoon. (Shulchan Aruch OC 263:2-5 and Mishne Torah, Hilchos shabas ch. 5)


9

If half an hour has passed since you lit the candles (assuming you didn't light early) then you no longer need a Shamash. You can even extinguish the candles at that point. This is explicit in the Shulchan Aruch סימן תרעב - זמן הדלקת נר חנכה הִלְכָּךְ צָרִיךְ לִתֵּן בָּהּ שֶׁמֶן כְּזֶה הַשִּׁעוּר, וְאִם נָתַן בָּהּ יוֹתֵר יָכוֹל לְכַבּוֹתָהּ לְאַחַר ...


9

The practice of lighting shabbat candles is a rabbinic requirement (see, e.g. Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Shabbat 25b; Rambam Laws of Shabbat 5:1), to honor the Shabbat and create a pleasant and peaceful atmosphere in the home (see e.g. here). According to most, the requirement may be fulfilled using electronic lights (at least incandescent ones) that serve ...


9

Mishna Brurah 263 s.k. 40 writes that the candles must remain lit at least until the meal has begun so that he derives benefit from them during his meal, otherwise the blessing on the candles is considered to be in vain (see Shulchan Aruch 263:9 which he is commenting on). He adds that it is preferred for them to remain lit until nightfall if that is later: ...


8

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


8

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


8

According to Rabbi Shlomo Fisher on ohr.edu, someone flying is exempt from lighting, because the rule is one candle per household ("נר איש וביתו;" Shabbos 21b); and if there's no one at home then there is no obligation to light.


7

The Tur (OC 672) says that lighting during the day doesn't work because (alluding to Chulin 60b) שרגא בטיהרא מאי אהני – "a candle in the daytime, what does it accomplish?" In other words, flames aren't noticeable in broad daylight that the miracle would be publicized.


7

In general, a blessing is recited prior to the performance of a mitzvah. However, the blessing over shabbat candles is an exception. While there is some debate over the matter, common custom is to light the candles and only then recite the blessing. (Note: this is true for Ashkenazic practice; I don't know what the Sephardic and other non-Ashkenazic ...


7

I know this is essentially a repeat of the other answers, but this is a matter of life and death, chalilah! The floating wicks you are using are designed for OIL - not paraffin. To quote the Amazon link you provided: FOR CHANUKAH & SHABBAT: Perfect for your Hanukah Menorah or to use to light Shabbos candles, these wicks fit almost any oil cup. ...


6

The Sefer Piskei Tshuvos siman 263:10 writes that if a man lights he makes the bracha first because he is not mekabel shabbas with his lighting(unless he wants to take shabbas in with lighting,then he should light first). See footnote 32 which brings sources such as Eishel Avraham and the Aruch Hashulchan seif 13,there is an opnion brought in the footnote ...


6

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


6

I agree with DanF's answer above. This has nothing to do with yahrzeit candles. If someone has a yahrzeit they should light a 24 hour candle to help remind him to think about the special qualities of the person who passed away, doing Mitzvos and/or learning Torah in his/her memory, and normally it is lit at home where one spends time and will notice the ...


6

There are a number of similar sounding questions to the one you posed which can be confusing, so while Alex's answer is indeed correct, it's helpful to understand the different issues so you can understand why some sources might "seem" to disagree. Here's the background: The rabbinic command of kindling lights on Friday evening is to have enough lights for ...


6

Both the Bet Yosef Y"D 228:39 and the Mahrshdam Y"D 97 mention that a Cherem is more severe when done with extinguishing candles - and is harder to undo. וכן מצאתי בשיטת הר"י ן' מיניר ז"ל וז"ל אם הוסיפו ואמרו שלא יוכלו להתיר דינו כדין נדר ושבועה שאינו ניתר אלא על ידי חכם ובפתח היתר כראוי והוסיף הרא"ה כי כל שהוסיפו חומרא בחרם על ...


5

The following is from Aish: After the recitation, many take special time to thank God for the many blessings of health, prosperity, and joy in their lives. There is also a special prayer composed by women, for women, which many include at this time: May it be Your will, Lord my God and God of my fathers, to be gracious to me (and to my spouse, ...


5

It would seem that a woman does not need to follow her husband's minhagim for things that are considered ladies' mitzvos. Thus R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe EH 2:12) writes that it is up to a woman if she wants to wear a sheital (wig), and she doesn't need to follow her husband if he feels it's not good enough as this is one of her mitzvos. Rabbi Doniel ...


5

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


5

This, according to Halachipedia: A wedding on Chanukah If the wedding takes place at night then the groom fulfills his obligation with the lighting in his father's house which took place before the wedding. [35] If the wedding takes place during the day before sunset, the groom [...] doesn't fulfill his obligation with the lighting in his ...


5

Halachically Speaking - page 11 quoting Miyum Hahalacha 4:46 says one should not put candles on the birthday cake. The practice of putting candles on a birthday cake corresponding to the celebrant’s age does not stem from a Jewish custom and should not be done Rabbi Eli Mansour quoting Rabbi Avraham Blumenkrantz says it should not be done. It ...


5

If it is within the 18 minutes before sundown, she can light. (Not sure if this is true for the entire 18 minutes, since tosfos Shabbos is required both at the beginning and the end of Shabbos; I remember reading an opinion here that 4 minutes before sunset is the latest. On the other hand, I have also read that tosfos Shabbos is considered when calculating ...


5

I cannot find this in the Vilna edition of Numbers Rabba. As noted by @Rish, it is mentioned by Hida who says that he heard this was a teaching of Hazal,[i] in his Homat Anakh (Parashat B'ha'alot'kha: 6) זכרנו את הדגה. מכאן שמדליקין נרות בשבת We remembered the fish: From here we see that we light candles on Shabbat. This seems to be an example of ...


5

In a responsum (Shu"t Ohr Yitzchak 2:108) R. Yitzchak Abadi writes as follows: ומה שיש מדקדקים להדליק נרות ולהשתמש לאורם מיד או לאחר קצת זמן כדי שלא תהא ברכתם לבטלה הם טועים בדין דהנה מצות הדלקה היא כדי שיוכל להשתמש לאור הנר כל הזמן שצריך לו ואין זה כהדלקת נר חנוכה שקבעו לה זמן וכבתה אין זקוק לה אלא בנר שבת הוא חייב שיהא דולק כל זמן שאפשר שיצטרך לו ...


4

Rav Moshe Feinstein: One does not recite a blessing. Rav Aharon Lichtenstein: One does recite a blessing. Both rabbis agree that one can use incandescent (preferably unfrosted) light bulbs in a "pressing situation," (eg. fire hazard, or you don't have candles). Ask your rabbi for practical applications. Regarding the second part of your question: Would ...


4

A shiur by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz that I listened to recently, but can't seem to find just now, notes that one option, recommended by Rabbi Baruch Simon, is that the person can light a flashlight on the plane. It has batteries present, so that is better than the usual electric menorah which relies on a power source that is not present (a power plant far away)....


4

The Pri Migadim says this is the custom, and suggests it is for man and woman, pointing to Eliya Rabba, who explains what that means: A man has 248 limbs, a woman 252. נר (candle) is 250, so 250 times 2 equals the number of limbs in man and woman combined. The Eliya Rabba brings this as an alternative reason for two candles on Shabbos. There the Eliya Rabba ...


4

From dinonline.org Can a goy light the Chanukah candles? Answer: A non-Jew cannot light the Chanukah candles (on behalf of a Jew), because he is not obligated in performing the mitzvah. He can light candles for himself, but it stands to reason that even the Rambam, who writes that a non-Jew who performs a mitzvah receives reward for ...


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