25

Many synagogues - mainly Orthodox, not specifically Hassidic, light two candles in front of the Chazzan's (cantor's) table. The candles are on during the duration of the prayers and extinguished afterwards. (Some places use electric "candles"; others use wax. I prefer the wax, though it is a bit more dangerous, smelly, and messy.) It has nothing to do with ...


15

The oldest source I could find is the Likutei MaHarich - (c. 1900). I recall hearing that the custom started, since the Halacha is that if the lady forgot to light one week she has to add a candle in future weeks, often when a lady gave birth they were busy and forgot. (Childbirth was not as easy years ago). Due to this they added a candle and today it has ...


14

Yes, we always light Shabbat candles, and at the usual time (non-primary source). The only time a holiday affects candle-lighting is that on the second day of a two-day holiday, so long as the second day is not also Shabbat, you don't light the second-day candles until dark so as not to encroach the first day. For Shabbat immediately after a holiday, or ...


13

This microfilm copy of the New York Times special millennium edition (dated January 1, 2100, actually published January 1, 2000) shows the Shabbat candle lighting times entry that you refer to. It is found in the lower left corner. The actual text of it says: JEWISH WOMEN/GIRLS LIGHT SHABBAT candles today 18 minutes before sunset In New York 4:39 ...


11

There seem to be different views. On the one hand Chabad are solidly in favour, see here. A reason is suggested why the custom is not prevalent. On the other, Rabbi Eli Mansour at dailyhalacha.com says “…Therefore, the prevalent practice is that the unmarried daughters living in the home do not light Shabbat candles, and instead rely on the mother’s ...


11

Of course, as the comment notes, consult your local Orthodox rabbi. But see here for a halacha sheet shown before and approved by Rav Shternbuch: If one’s wife is not home must the husband light the candles? Seeing that men are obligated to light Shabbos candles as much as women are, if the wife is not present it is up to the husband to light the ...


10

The reason why we light candles a few minutes early (18 minutes) is in order to avoid any possibility of starting Shabbat late. Think of it as a train leaving the station. If you're one minute late, you missed it. By the way, though most communities light Shabbat candles 18 minutes before sunset, local custom may vary. For instance in Jerusalem, the custom ...


10

You are essentially correct. There is a blessing to be said when you see fire on Saturday night. It is essentially entirely independent of Havdalah. If you're making Havdalah anyway (99% of cases) then the custom is to say that blessing at that time to give it honor (or something like that). But if you don't have fire available that certainly doesn't ...


9

This custom is mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch (OC 610:1). It is supposed to serve as a reminder to avoid marital relations on Yom Kippur. It is common to allow at least some light into the bedroom: see "The Laws of Lighting Candles for Yom Kippur" by R' Yosef Zimbal.


9

Men and women are both obligated in the Mitzva of Shabbat candles and saying the blessing. Women have precedence to ensure the Mitzva is fulfilled because they are more often at home preparing the house on Friday afternoon. (Shulchan Aruch OC 263:2-5 and Mishne Torah, Hilchos shabas ch. 5)


9

Mishna Brurah 263 s.k. 40 writes that the candles must remain lit at least until the meal has begun so that he derives benefit from them during his meal, otherwise the blessing on the candles is considered to be in vain (see Shulchan Aruch 263:9 which he is commenting on). He adds that it is preferred for them to remain lit until nightfall if that is later: ...


8

Aruch HaShulchan 265:12 & 265:13 discusses this. From what I understand the Gemara is talking about placing a bowl of water under the candle where it would be prohibited even from Erev Shabbos, however oil with water in a glass is no issue. Orach Chaim 265:4 says that so long one has no intention that it is being done to extinguish the flame sooner it ...


8

Many chasidim light candles on the yahrtzeits of important figures in chasidic history. One of the more widely-practiced ones (in the US) is to light a candle on the Yahrtzeit of R' Mendel of Riminov, which is the night after Lag Ba'omer. Chasidish shuls or shuls with lots of chasidim tend to leave out candles for people to light in the shul. I've even ...


8

According to Rabbi Shlomo Fisher on ohr.edu, someone flying is exempt from lighting, because the rule is one candle per household ("נר איש וביתו;" Shabbos 21b); and if there's no one at home then there is no obligation to light.


8

If half an hour has passed since you lit the candles (assuming you didn't light early) then you no longer need a Shamash. You can even extinguish the candles at that point. This is explicit in the Shulchan Aruch סימן תרעב - זמן הדלקת נר חנכה הִלְכָּךְ צָרִיךְ לִתֵּן בָּהּ שֶׁמֶן כְּזֶה הַשִּׁעוּר, וְאִם נָתַן בָּהּ יוֹתֵר יָכוֹל לְכַבּוֹתָהּ לְאַחַר ...


7

Say it only during kiddush. The women too should only say it during kiddush. Why would one assume the two would be any different? They are both obligated in kiddush and both obligated to have the lights lit. The Talmud in Sukkah (47b) implies already that the shehechiyanu is said with the kiddush. (The Tur OC 519 deems it an "enactment of [the sages] to say ...


7

In SA OC Siman 263 M"A Sif-Katan 12 he writes that if one makes the bracha before lighting (on Shabbos) then that's considered to be "Kabbalas Shabbos" and it's then ossur to light candles. However he then says if that's the case ("v'im cain"), then on Yom Tov one should make the bracha and then light. (Since there is no problem of lighting a candle on yom ...


7

I can't say I've ever seen this practiced, but lighting candles in one's bedroom is certainly a traditional thing to do on Yom Kippur. The Mishna (Pesachim 4:4) rules that some places light Yom Kippur candles and some places don't. The explanation always given (see, for example, the commentary of Rav Ovadia of Bartenura) is that marital relations are ...


7

In general, a blessing is recited prior to the performance of a mitzvah. However, the blessing over shabbat candles is an exception. While there is some debate over the matter, common custom is to light the candles and only then recite the blessing. (Note: this is true for Ashkenazic practice; I don't know what the Sephardic and other non-Ashkenazic ...


7

The practice of lighting shabbat candles is a rabbinic requirement (see, e.g. Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Shabbat 25b; Rambam Laws of Shabbat 5:1), to honor the Shabbat and create a pleasant and peaceful atmosphere in the home (see e.g. here). According to most, the requirement may be fulfilled using electronic lights (at least incandescent ones) that serve ...


7

I know this is essentially a repeat of the other answers, but this is a matter of life and death, chalilah! The floating wicks you are using are designed for OIL - not paraffin. To quote the Amazon link you provided: FOR CHANUKAH & SHABBAT: Perfect for your Hanukah Menorah or to use to light Shabbos candles, these wicks fit almost any oil cup. ...


6

Regarding your sidebar about conversion: Decisions about conversion need to be made with the guidance of a competent rabbi who knows you. If you are serious about converting, and you don't already know a rabbi, I implore you to get in touch with a rabbi in your area, or as close to your area as possible. Relationships build over time, but first contact must ...


6

The Sefer Piskei Tshuvos siman 263:10 writes that if a man lights he makes the bracha first because he is not mekabel shabbas with his lighting(unless he wants to take shabbas in with lighting,then he should light first). See footnote 32 which brings sources such as Eishel Avraham and the Aruch Hashulchan seif 13,there is an opnion brought in the footnote ...


6

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


6

I agree with DanF's answer above. This has nothing to do with yahrzeit candles. If someone has a yahrzeit they should light a 24 hour candle to help remind him to think about the special qualities of the person who passed away, doing Mitzvos and/or learning Torah in his/her memory, and normally it is lit at home where one spends time and will notice the ...


6

The Tur (OC 672) says that lighting during the day doesn't work because (alluding to Chulin 60b) שרגא בטיהרא מאי אהני – "a candle in the daytime, what does it accomplish?" In other words, flames aren't noticeable in broad daylight that the miracle would be publicized.


6

Both the Bet Yosef Y"D 228:39 and the Mahrshdam Y"D 97 mention that a Cherem is more severe when done with extinguishing candles - and is harder to undo. וכן מצאתי בשיטת הר"י ן' מיניר ז"ל וז"ל אם הוסיפו ואמרו שלא יוכלו להתיר דינו כדין נדר ושבועה שאינו ניתר אלא על ידי חכם ובפתח היתר כראוי והוסיף הרא"ה כי כל שהוסיפו חומרא בחרם על מנהגם הראשון כגון התרועות ...


5

The Aruch haShulchan writes (OC 695:8): ומצוה להרבות בנרות לפנות ערב, כדכתיב: "ליהודים היתה אורה"‏ It is a Mitzva to add candles in the evening, as it says: The Jews had light He doesn't source himself and I haven't seen this anywhere else. It would seem he is using the word 'Mitzva' here quite loosely.


5

Lechatchila, one should light Shabbat and Yom Tov candles where one is going to eat (Shulchan Aruch 273:7 and Mishna Berura there), which in this case is the Sukkah. However, the Talmud (Sukkah 29a) explicitly forbids keeping lit candles in a small Sukkah and this is codified in Shulchan Aruch (OC 639:1). The Mishna Berura there (sk 8) is clear that this ...


5

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


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