11

Rav Eliezer Melamed says that if the meat meal is finished and it is a matter of waiting the prescribed time (6 hours) then one should taste the hershey bar (or ice cream in his example) and rely on the Rishonim that say you don't have to wait rather than make a Beracha for no reason. This does not apply when one is in middle of a meat meal, as there is no ...


7

The poskim discuss the case of a person who separated challah with a b'rachah and then did hataras n'darim to nullify the separation (and therefore will have to separate again). Is the person's b'rachah considered l'vatalah? The Chasam Sofer says it was not l'vatalah, possibly based on the S'dei Chemed, Vol. 6, p. 320. But the case of the tallis may be ...


6

If he is unsure if he recited Shema, he should recite it with its blessings (OC 67). If one is unsure if one had recited the Amida, one should recite it and intend that it should be a voluntary prayer if one had already said it (OC 107:1). Some say this isn't necessary for Arvit which is fundamentally a lower level obligation, but most don't distinguish (...


5

There is much discussion is this in Aharonim. R. Yitshak Yosef writes in Yalkut Yosef (Kitsur OH 184:14, 185:4, etc.) that a mental blessing cannot be a berakha l'vatala. R. Zilberstein quotes this in Hashukei Hemed (Pesahim 13a) from the Sdei Hemed (Vol. I: ב: klal 115). R. Yosef (Yalkut Yosef notes to Hilhkot Hashkamat HaBoker ch. 4) also quotes this ...


5

It's a machloket Rambam/Tosfot on the nature of bracha levatala- is it deoraita or derabanan? If it's derabanan, it's better to have been over the issur of bracha levatala than to actively be over the issur of milk after meat. If it's deoraita, one of course shouldn't be over the deoraita of bracha levatala and should taste the milk, then being over on the ...


4

I need to find a specific proof for this presumption, but when I learned retroactive areas, I pictured 2 timelines, 1 that happened but discontinued, and 1 that supplanted the first timeline and continued (Think Back to the Future). In the case of the esrog, the retroactive reality of not owning the esrog supplants the reality of the one where he owns the ...


4

The halacha by lulav an esrog (as codified by the Shulchan Aruch OC 648:4) is that I can give it to my friend as a present on condition that he return it, and through that it is considered that he owns it for that time period, and he thereby fulfills his obligation with it. However, if he fails to return it in time it retroactively was never his. In this ...


4

Halachic aspects: The Aruch haShulchan in Orach Chaim - סימן ח - דיני ציצית ועטיפתו - brings the Bet Yosef who says that our small Talit Kattan is a valid garment that fully fulfills that requirements for Tzitzith. Here's what he write in Siman ז for example: ואחר כך כתב רבינו הבית יוסף בסעיף ג: ‏ טליתות קטנים שלנו, שאנו נוהגים אף על פי שאין ...


3

Hamapil is an independent bracha, not a bracha on the kriat shema. Berachot 60b: הנכנס לישן על מטתו אומר משמע ישראל עד והיה אם שמוע ואומר ברוך המפיל חבלי שינה על עיני ותנומה על עפעפי ומאיר לאישון בת עין יהי רצון מלפניך ה' אלהי שתשכיבני לשלום ותן חלקי בתורתך ותרגילני לידי מצוה ואל תרגילני לידי עבירה ואל תביאני לידי חטא ולא לידי עון ולא לידי נסיון ולא ...


3

See SA OC 206, 6: If he took in his hand a fruit in attempt to eat it, and the fruit fell from his hand and gets lost, or dirty and is lo unfit for consumption, ... He needs to say Baruch Shem Kevod Malchouto Leolam Vaed because he pronounced the name of G-d in vain. So, at the time of the blessing there was no error and the blessing was appropriate in the ...


3

For a child of chinuch age (let's say .. 7, 8, or 9), there's a rabbinic obligation to give them an otherwise-real mitzva. For a three-year-old, there's a meta-obligation to raise them in such a way that they'll be ready for mitzvot later on. If a plush lulav helps that, then why not? A pasul lulav is a bit trickier as people may confuse it with the real ...


2

Based on שולחן ערוך אורח חיים סימן רו סעיף ו, here we say ברוך שם כבוד מלכותו לעולם ועד because of saying God's name in vain. It would seem therefore, that it doesn't really have anything to do with ברכות, necessarily and you should say it if you say God's name in vain in any context. It would also apply to a ברכה which includes 'false' statements.


1

It is forbidden to say a beracha when there is no halachic obligation to do so (see Shulchan Arach OC Siman 215 seif 4). This is true even for a beracha that was formulated by chazal, all the more so for a made up beracha. I would suggest saying this as a tefila and omitting the "Baruch Ata Hashem Shomeah Tefila"


1

Useless blessing versus spontaneous praise Useless blessing Brachot 33a: It says that he who says habdalah in the Tefillah is more praiseworthy than he who says it over the cup [of wine], which would show that to say it in Tefillah alone is sufficient, and again it teaches, 'and if he says it in both, may blessings rest on his head', but since he has ...


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