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46

Before a name: הבחור החשוב - הבה"ח Habachur hashuv; "The important young man" המלומד בניסים = המלוב"ן Hamulumad benisim; (one) who has practiced many miracles - used for sfaradic Rabis who deal with "Torat Hanistar" רב/רבי = ר׳; rav/rabi; "rabbi...". OR רבינו; rabeinu; "our rabbi" הרב = הר׳; harav; "the rabbi". הרב רבי/רבינו = הר״ר; harav rabi/rabeinu; "...


23

Then, too, we have to deal with some of the derogatory ones. A couple to start with: י"ש or ימ"ש = yimach shemo יש"ו = yimach shemam vizichram or yimach shimo vizichro (Great acronym by the way!) שר"י = shem resha'im yirkav


21

The Commentary on the Mishnah came first. In his colophon at the end of it, Rambam writes that he began writing the commentary at age 23, and finished it at age 30, in the year 1479 of the "Era of Documents" (4928 since Creation, 1168 CE). The Mishneh Torah, on the other hand, was written in the 4930s. In the introduction he says that the current year is ...


18

The Bar-Ilan Responsa project has an online version that allows free searches, displaying up to 150 words from each result. This is an extremely powerful program, as its textbase is "clean" and edited, as opposed to many other search programs (such as Hebrewbooks and Otzar HaChochma) which are mostly based on error-prone, OCR-derived text.


15

In Orach Chayim, it refers to a comment by the Yad Efrayim, in the margin. The Business Halacha Institute tells me that in Choshen Mishpat it points to a chidush [a novel thought or opinion].


14

I don't know if this qualifies as a truly "classic" source, but there is a classic essay by R' Zevin about "The Judgment of Shylock According to Halachah." Update: It seems that Hebrewbooks has removed this sefer (לאור ההלכה) from their collection. I could not locate the article anywhere else online, except for a snippet view in Google Books here. Also of ...


14

The Midrash (Exodus Rabbah 47:1) says that one reason was to maintain one portion of the Torah as a uniquely Jewish possession. The gentiles have the written Torah (ever since, under order of Ptolemy II Philadelphus, it was translated into Greek, and later into other languages); but so long as the Oral Torah remained orally transmitted, it was unavailable to ...


12

There are several factors to be considered to determine whether or not Harry Potter would be liable to prosecution under the witchcraft clause. Is he Jewish? Regarding his Jewishness, as noted the evidence suggests he is Christian, although this does not preclude him from theoretically being descended from Jews (especially given Rowling's statement that ...


11

According to Wikipedia, Jubilees was written in the later Second Temple era, well past the cut-off date for canonization in the Tanach. It was adopted by the Hasmonians (Chashmonaim), but despite the general Rabbinic dislike of the Hasmonians, it is not mentioned at all by "Pharisaic or Rabbinic sources," eg. the Mishna. Since the book was not canonized in ...


10

Rashi in Pesachim 56a writes that Sefer HaRefuos was hidden because their hearts were not humbled over their illness but were, rather, healed immediately. Rambam in Peirush Hamishna (Pesachim 4:10) rejects this approach arguing that just as one may not hold back food from the hungry, so too one may not withhold healing from the ill. Instead, Rambam writes ...


9

Let's assume MLA style. eHow has this: Lastly, if your source is a sacred text, such as the Bible or Talmud, cite the edition, book, chapter, and verse. This may vary according to each text. ([Edition], [Book]. [Chapter].[Verse]) So treat Talmud like Bible. Purdue University's writing lab has this: Citing the Bible In your first ...


9

There are many answers given to this question: The Midrash cited in the other answer refers to the exclusive relationship that the Oral Torah allowed. The Christians may read the written Torah, but only the Jews had the Oral Torah. (The Gemara in Gittin also quotes that Passuk.) The Rambam in Moreh Nevuchim (I.71) takes this further and says that by ...


9

In those cases, the copyright would apply to the refinements made to the text as a result of the publisher's research. For example, if you want to publish a sefer you cannot just grab the text from the Bar Ilan disk, since they put much effort into correcting the mistakes and expanding the abbreviations, etc. If, however, a publisher is just copying an old ...


8

In the Frankel ed. it is called Hagahos Maimoniyos.


8

Well wikisource has bits and pieces as far as I can tell, over here. And you can see all 4 seforim over here). You can also find it on HebrewBooks.org (pdf's are searchable, but not so good because of OCR) here and here.


8

There is an excellent website for such calculations here. It is customizable based on the sefer and review schedule of your preference. It is a little complicated, but provides example entries to help you figure out how to use it. Also, there are links on the side of that webpage leading to versions of the calculator specific to daf yomi/ amud yomi/ tanach/ ...


8

Abarbanel discusses why all nevuos, including those of Yeshayahu, Yirmiyahu, etc., are not written in their historical context in Melachim or elsewhere. For that matter, why a separate book for Tehillim and Mishlei? Why not just include them with the stories of David and Shlomo? I will not post his entire discussion here, but the gist of it is twofold: It ...


8

Yes. Here is a page from Eichlers full of Jewish comic books


8

This is from an old Jewish Polish folk tale. A man's house is too crowded, so the rabbi tells him to bring in all his animals, one species at a time. When there are no more to being in, he tells him to take them all out. All of a sudden, the house feels so much roomier, despite staying exactly the same. Links: http://www.amazon.com/It-Could-Always-Be-Worse/...


8

Highly recommended is The Living Torah by the late Rabbi Arye Kaplan. It's translated into modern English - no thee, thy and thou. He brings numerous interpretations in the footnotes where available. He has broken each chapter into sub-chapters - each with its own heading. He brings lots of maps and charts and images. Apparently it's online here. (...


7

Horeb, by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, is definitely directed to a Jewish audience, but is, I suspect, largely comprehensible by others. Herman Wouk's This Is My God is directed mostly to an irreligious Jewish audience, but was interesting to me (a religious Jew) also and is certainly comprehensible by non-Jews.


7

In the Torah periodical ישורון for Kislev 5767, in an article on "Derashat haRamban - Torat Hashem Temimah", on page 38-9 (and specifically in footnote 14) Rav Yaakov Yehuda Zilberlicht discusses what Ramban is referring to by ספר הרומאים (The Book of the Romans). Possibilities that he raises: It is obvious that Ramban is referring to a Roman history book, ...


7

Start with Pines' translation into English since it's the classic English translation. After that, look at Yehuda Ibn Tibbon's translation - that is the original Hebrew translation. I push the classic sources since they are clear enough to provide a thorough explanation. The vast majority of the new versions don't add anything to the discussion, other ...


7

According to this note (in the list of commentators used by Nechama Leibowitz in her own essays on the Torah), he was a dayan in the Sephardic community of Hamburg, and died in 1701 (R. David Nieto, in his letter cited below, gives it as Cheshvan 5462, which matches the claim of 1701). It seems, too, that the correct Latin-alphabet spelling of his family ...


7

Rambam states explicitly in the first paragraph of his introduction to Sefer Hamitzvot that the Commentary to the Mishnah came first: After having completed our previous well-known work wherein we included a commentary to the whole Mishnah – our goal in that work having been satisfied with the explanation of the substance of each and every Halacha in ...


7

From the Feldheim website: Of the many works of Rabbi Moshe Hayyim Luzzatto, Mesillat Yesharim stands out as his magnum opus. Ever since it was first published in 1740 in Amsterdam, it has enjoyed great renown and was eventually adopted as a basic text for ethical study. Throughout the long history of its publication, Mesillat Yesharim fell prey to many ...


7

I will summarize three positions I have read on this. 1. Artscroll Artscroll has ruled (in Limud Yomi: A Daily Dose of Torah ed. 1 vol. 7) that it is forbidden to read business texts, including advertisements and billboards (p. 91) and newspapers (p. 108); but permitted reading books of secular knowledge (p. 99). They cited no sources except Shulchan Aruch ...


7

Rabbi Breitowitz's book: Between Civil & Religious Law: The Plight of the Agunah in American Society And later, Rabbi Broyde's: Marriage, Divorce, and the Abandoned Wife in Jewish Law


7

The Talmud discusses Genizoth. I don't recall off-hand the context, but I remember learning a Gemara that said students of great sages in the Tannaic era, when writing Torah SheBe'Al Peh was prohibited, would take notes that they would later commit to memory before placing in Genizah. In addition (or in contrast, perhaps), if a scribe made an uncorrectable ...


7

The only question that I'm going to answer directly is number 2, since I heard directly from my Rebbi that it is 100% permissible (unfortunately, I can't quote it in his name since I didn't get his permission to use his name on this site, but I'll say that he's a well respected Musmach from Yeshivas Chafetz Chaim). He said that given the limited number of ...


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