16

Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch Chayos (assuming he falls under your definition of "Orthodox") discusses this in the opening section of his Iggeres Bikores. At first astounded at where Rashi conjures this information given that the implication of the gemara is that a targum existed only as far back as the time of Ezra, he concludes that perhaps what Rashi (and others ...


16

As mentioned by @WAF, R' David Zvi Hoffman wrote a response to bible criticism in the early 1900's which is available on Daat.co.il. Umberto Cassuto, while not strictly orthodox, published a book in reply to the DH in 1941. There are some notes on it here, and a new edition is available online here: http://www.shalempress.co.il/download/Products/...


11

Regarding the broad question of later additions into the text of the Torah, this has certainly been the view held by various Orthodox Jews historically, including noted rabbis. To quote Dr. Marc Shapiro in Maimonides' Thirteen Principles: The Last Word in Jewish Theology?: Rabbinic sources speak of tikkun soferim, i.e. textual changes introduced by the ...


8

The discussion as to whether Yeshoshua wrote the last eight lines or Moshe wrote them "bedimah" (either with tears or "confused") applies only to those lines. And Moshe the servant of HaShem died in the land of Moav by the word of HaShem.[Devarim 34:5] On this verse Rashi quotes a famous debate regarding the last eight verses of the Tora; is it possible ...


6

The standard definition of heresy as found in the vast majority of contemporary responsa on topics that require its definition, such as whether spmepne with a given belief is an acceptable conversion candidate, can be counted toward a minyan, or can one can drink wine that was handled by them is consistently the 13 fundamentals of Jewish Faith. (Perhaps with ...


6

Although the idea that verses were added to the Sefer Torah that we have is often attributed to the Ibn Ezra, his comments on this verse would seem to indicate he doesn't hold of the idea. He quotes someone ("Yitzchaki" - it is a matter of speculation of who that could refer to, although we know from other references it was someone from Spain) who says that ...


6

Rav Hirsch goes over the names and discusses the meaning of the names and the significance for the basic traits of the generation that name is used for. He points out (4:18-22 and 5:11-27). For example, Lemech ends the progress of the generations with a statement that sums up the state of the descent, though from different sides. The Cainite line is constant ...


5

To answer the first part of your question, yes the sages discussed the authorship of Isaiah, and he did not write his own book. See here Bava Bathra 15a Hezekiah and his colleagues wrote (Mnemonic YMSHK) Isaiah,  Proverbs, the Song of Songs and Ecclesiastes. Rashi explains that the prophets would write their prophecies at the end of their lives and ...


5

The Maharal Teferes Yisroel 65 says that the meaning of Onkelos from Sinai is that the content and meaning of the Targum is in accordance with the tradition from the prophets and not his own innovation. It seems very difficult to understand Rashi as intending anything else, since Rashi writes: אונקלוס תרגם לשון מוקש. ואני אומר שלא חש לדקדק בלשון ...


4

If you simply read the "pshat" as recorded, it seems to work quite nicely (partly taken from Rav Menachem Leibtag). The brothers see Yishmaelim and therefore decide to sell Yosef. Before they get to it, Midyanim come and take him out of the bor (i.e. the pit) and sell him to the Yishmaelim (to bring to Egypt). Since the Midyanim, in effect, did the ...


4

This supposed "later time" is that of King Yoshiyahu (Josiah). So a very straightforward piece of evidence against this notion is the following quotation in connection with King Amatziah, about 200 years before Yoshiyahu: But the sons of the assassins he did not execute, as it is written in the book of the Torah of Moses, which the Lord commanded saying: "...


3

Our tradition teaches that the name of G-d, the tetragrammaton, refers to G-d in his attribute of mercy (and other things too). Elokim refers to G-d in his attribute of strict judgement. Chizkuni (commentaries to be found at http://www.sefaria.org/) says: ביום עשות ה' אלקים עכשיו כשנבנו שמים וארץ במילואם הזכיר  עליהם שם המיוחד משום דברב עם הדרת מלך ...


3

While "traditional commentators" may need a bit of a definition, I don't believe any of them do. Some do not comment on this, and those who do say emphatically that it was either referring to a very early period (i.e. before Moshe), and/or that it was written "Bederech Nevuah". See here for all the Mefarshim I have looked through. The only exception to ...


3

B"H Via Google and Da`at, I found R' Yizhaq Avrabanel addressing this question (my translation) although he doesn't seem bothered by the revealing of future events and chalks it up to Omniscience. ומהם אמרו שזה הפסוק כתב יהושע בתורה ואין הדבר כן. אבל משה רבינו כתב כל זה עם היותו עתיד להיות מפני הגבורה שצוהו לכתוב כן כמו שכתב ויעל משה וימת שם משה כפי הדעת ...


3

Jewish society and practice are based on a single, well-known account of their founding. It states that in the year 2448 on the Jewish calendar, an entire nation gathered at the foot of a mountain in the Sinai Desert and witnessed G-d speak. They made multiple copies of the written record and had them spread among the people. They passed on their eyewitness ...


2

Two other sources one may want to check: Ben Zion Katz, M.D. authored a short book titled A Journey Through Torah: A Critique of the Documentary Hypothesis (Urim Publications,2012) in which he confronts the DH based on jewish sources. There's an online review by JBQ on his book here. I also recommend the Baal Otzrot's Commentary on the Torah which deals ...


2

The Ramban in במדבר פרק-כא addresses this: השלים הכתוב להזכיר הענין בכאן וזה כענין הפרשה שאמרה ברדת המן (שמות טז לד לה) ויניחהו אהרן לפני העדות למשמרת ובני ישראל אכלו את המן ארבעים שנה עד בואם אל ארץ נושבת את המן אכלו עד בואם אל קצה ארץ כנען והוא לאחר מיתתו של משה עד ממחרת הפסח (יהושע ה יב)‏ He brings other examples of the future being added as a ...


2

First we need to figure out if belief in Mosaic authorship is an ikar emuna (if it is, that would obviously mean that there is no room for it in observant Judaism, since it would be labeled as heresy). We also need to address the question if the study of biblical criticism threatens the authority of the Torah and its divine origin. The main Chazalic ...


2

In the comments above, I had previously recommended R Umberto Cassuto's book. In the meantime I came across R Chaim Jachter's Reason to believe which has a page addressing biblical criticism. He cites two websites relevant for your search Online shiurim from R Amnon Bazak at VBM Online shiurim from R Menachem Leibtag (I think correct URL is now tanach.org) ...


2

Yosef's brothers pulled him up from the ditch and sold him to the Yishme'elim who sold him to the Midyanim who sold him to the Medanim who sold him to Potiphar (Sifte'i Hakhamim). To answer the second question: no (see above).


1

See Meshech Chochma commentary #43 on Bemidbar (Numbers 32:33). It is a long, so I don't want to copy or translate everything. The gist of it is that part of the tribe of Menashe afterwards decided to join the other two tribes. Prior to giving the them the land, Moses bound them by the same conditions as Reuven and Gad. This is a Talmudic principle that ...


1

Wikipedia cites Rabbi Menachem Mendel Kasher (1895-1983) in an article about Mosaic authorship of the Torah: ... accepted the documentary hypothesis but adapted it to the Mosaic tradition, pointing to certain traditions of the Oral Torah which show Moses quoting Genesis prior to the epiphany at Sinai; based on a number of Bible verses and rabbinic ...


1

Shadal to shemos 16:35 writes that this posuk does not imply that Moshe didnt wrote it, because he did not wrote "וישבות המן" as stated in Yehoshua (5:12). He says that the posuk register that bnei Yisroel ate the manna until they "came unto the קצה ארץ כנען", thus, Moshe wrote this there before he died. [לה] ובני ישראל אכלו את המן ארבעים שנה וגו' : אין ...


1

If one assumes that the Torah was written in the order that the events happened (lest this occur), then it is only logical to conclude that this verse was written at the end of the 40 years, when "they came to the border of the land of Canaan" and the mahn had stopped. When did this happen? In Joshua ch. 5 we are explicitly told: 10 Encamped at Gilgal, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible