8

R' Shlomo Aviner was asked this question, and his response-- published on his website-- was that this WOULD be permissible for two reasons: 1) The wording isn't an essential part of benching הנוסח הזה הוא לא מעיקר הזימון That wording is not the essence of the zimun. The "birshus" is merely an addition. Sephardim, Ashkenazim, Yemenites, Yiddish-...


3

The Torah varies between the pronominal suffixes for second person masculine singular with sh'va before kamatz and the reverse, with the latter appearing more in pausal positions. Both are, as evidenced by the contexts in which they appear, masculine. The variation (as opposed to one of the two appearing consistently) is visible in the line you quoted, as ...


3

Berachos 20b says that bentching before one is full is Rabbinic in nature. It brings this Halacha in the context of the following question: אמר ליה רבינא לרבא נשים בברכת המזון דאורייתא או דרבנן למאי נפקא מינה לאפוקי רבים ידי חובתן אי אמרת דאורייתא אתי דאורייתא ומפיק דאורייתא אלא אי אמרת דרבנן הוי שאינו מחוייב בדבר וכל שאינו מחוייב בדבר אינו מוציא את הרבים ...


3

This Hebrew article on Shir Hamaalos gives me some thoughts on this that may answer the question: Firstly, while this is a very widespread Minhag nowadays, it isn't all that old. Perhaps some of the Haggados that you were using were based on versions that were written prior to this custom being accepted in many communities. This would mean that there is no ...


3

I give some possible translations in my book, Treasure of Shabbat: An Illuminated Guide to the Shabbat Table Experience: Finding Meaning and Inspiration through Shabbat Observance at Home.


2

There seems to be some confusion regarding your question, as seen in comments above. So let me try and clarify what should be done in the situation you describe of two adults having a meal. If your meal includes bread, in which case it starts with washing and the blessing of hamotzi, then you do not say the zimmum with the short introduction to birkat ...


2

Some suggested resources: Yiddish Prof. Havah Turniansky has an article here treating old editions of bentchers. Examining the provenance of each edition may lead you to find reasons for the distribution of particular bentchers and their [stylistic] evolvement in general. The Montefiore Endowment contains a miniature Italian c.1490 manuscript of wedding ...


1

You appear to be having difficulty with the middle of the fourth bracha of the Birkhat Hamazon due to your level of Hebrew comprehension. An interlinear bencher or siddur, such as the Artscroll Simchat Yehoshua series, would provide you with word-for-word English text so you could adapt your benching to the situation at hand. Please see picture below to see ...


1

The Talmud requires a guest to add a blessing for his host in his blessings after the meal. While it provides a suggested text, old prayer booklets, especially Ashkenazi ones, include a different blessing which consistently appears with some minor variations as: הרחמן הוא יברך את [אבי] מארי בעל הבית הזה ואת [אמי] מרתי בעלת הבית הזה ואת ביתם ואת זרעם ואת כל ...


1

I believe the intention of the plural is for when one blesses at least one other, such as in the siddur shown in the question there is in parenthesis a mention of one's father and mother. One eating alone who is not blessing anyone else, such as family members, would skip the words אותנו וכל אשר לנו. Let us point out that the text (נוסח) of all berachos is ...


1

I found the following in the Beinenu.com sedra sheet for Ki Sovo "תחת אשר לא עבדת את ה' אלקיך בשמחה ובטוב לבב" ( דברים כ"ח - מ"ז) כותב רבי מאיר מונק בספרו "דרכי נועם", המצוות שאנו עושים, צריכים להיעשות בשמחה. אך פעמים רבות איננו שמחים במצוות, כמה פעמים אנחנו לא נוטלים ידיים כדי לא לברך ברכת המזון, כלומר, ברכת המזון נחשבת כעול, איה השמחה? ...


1

Based on Hilchos Bkias HaPat and down through Hilchos Birkas Hamazon, it would seem that if you ate a shiyur of bread which warrants Birkas Hamazon (a kezayis), then you could definitely say birkas hamazon on that bread (why not? you're blessing kosher food!). However, if you rely on the halachic opinions that the other parts of a food object are "mashlim" ...


1

Let's do this scientifically: The classic Birkat haMazon (in Nusach Ashkenaz) has about 550 words. Of these only about 280 words are actually part of the Torah and Rabbinic obligation for Grace after Meals. The other 45% are additions - starting with הָרַחֲמָן - which are nice to say but can be skipped with impunity. So it's possible that your speed-...


1

The 'eating together' that binds a group together for Zimmun would have to be eating. Preparing for the meal together, or performing any pre-meal prerequisites/rituals (such as washing hands) is not any form of kvius. Two groups of people who eat even in the same house (which two cars do not fit that description), can only be mitztaref for Zimmun if they ...


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