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23

The Aruch HaShulchan says that since wine and other drinks were expensive and they only drank water, they did not Bentch on a Kos. HaRav Moshe Feinstein Zatzal says that since for hundreds of years due to the lack of wine Jews relied on the Poskim that say you do not need a Kos -- therefore even today when wine is readily available we retain the Halacha ...


15

This idea, that it's based on a mistaken expansion of 'בשב (meaning 'בשמואל ב) to mean בשבת, comes from R. Baruch Epstein's Mekor Baruch. However, it is demonstrably untrue. The custom of alternating between מגדיל on weekdays and מגדיל on Shabbos is mentioned by Avudraham, who lived in the 14th century. (He doesn't mention the custom of doing so on Yom Tov ...


14

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


11

The Mishna Berura says: בימינו נהגו הנשים לומר ג"כ על בריתך שחתמת בבשרנו ועל תורתך שלמדתנו וכו' והכוונה על ברית הזכרים שחתמת בבשרנו וכן תורתך שלמדתנו על למוד הזכרים שבזכות התורה והברית נחלו ישראל את הארץ ועוד שגם הנשים צריכות ללמוד מצות שלהן לידע היאך לעשותן. Loosely translated: "These days the Minhag is that women also say "for the covenant...", and it ...


10

It should be clear to anyone with a Shulchan Aruch that one can certainly bentch after having sung this song. Consider these factors, all of which the Shulchan Aruch says leaving out would require you to redo your bentching, and all of which are missing in Tzur Mishelo: You must mention both Brit and Torah (OC 187:3) You must mention the Kingship of the ...


9

The Baal Hatanya, in his Shulchan Aruch (190:4), states that the cup can be passed to a child. (In footnote כז there it is noted that this is by analogy with various other cases where this may be done, such as havdalah on Motzaei Shabbos of the Nine Days, or a bris on Tisha B'Av.) The reason, he says, is: לפי שגם על המברך לא חל החיוב כלל שלא חייבוהו אלא ...


9

No. There are three categories of grain-based products: "Bread." Always hamotzee. "Snacky, quasi-breadlike substances." (Pas haba beKisnin.) Mezonos, but if you eat them like a meal, then hamotzee. This was the category about which you read. "Definitely not bread." Always mezonos, even if you ate ten pounds of the stuff for dinner. (Though you'd have ...


8

See the excellent article here regarding the proper nussach of zimmun. The highlights are: that the introductory bit (everything before Nevarech she'achalnu mishelo) is based on a ruling of the Zohar quoted in the Magen Avraham quoted in the Mishna Berura (OC 192 sk 2) and in the Aruch HaShulchan (OC 192:2) which says that every "davar shebikusha" needs a ...


8

The correct order to perform the Mitzvos would be: 1 - Krias Shema(which is most frequent) 2 - Birchas Hamazon 3 - Sefiras Haomer Many people are accustomed to recite Krias Shema after Birchas Hamazon, even though Krias Shema is the more frequent Mitzvah. The reason why many permit this is that one is not obligated to interrupt his ...


8

R' Shlomo Aviner was asked this question, and his response-- published on his website-- was that this WOULD be permissible for two reasons: 1) The wording isn't an essential part of benching הנוסח הזה הוא לא מעיקר הזימון That wording is not the essence of the zimun. The "birshus" is merely an addition. Sephardim, Ashkenazim, Yemenites, Yiddish-...


7

In the book "Rite and Reason" the four verses are related to four blessings in bentching. "...And all flesh shall bless..." relates to "He gives bread to all flesh". "We shall bless God forever" relates to "We shall thank..." "...his kindness endures forever" relates to "We shall never be ashamed..." and "who can relate all His praise" relates to the ...


7

The standard grammatical rule is that a word whose first vowel is a segol gets converted to a komotz when that word ends a sentence (or at an etnachta, which functions like a semicolon). This is a verse that ends with "lechem", so it becomes "lachem." Similarly, Vayeitzei begins that Yaakov left from Be'er Shava. (Would have been Sheva, but it's at the end ...


7

I always learned that yes people mistook it saying Shmuel Bet (22:51) instead of Tehillim (18:51) (the pasuk appears twice, with this small change) and started saying it on Shabbat. However I found this source which says that the study of Ketuvim was forbidden on Shabbat and therefore the Shmuel verse had to be recited instead of the Tehillim verse, and ...


7

See Mateh Moshe (2:338), who brings from the Mordechai that one should say "ואמרו אמן" at the end of the Harachaman section as an exhortation (אזהרה) to the others there to answer "amen" as a form of necessary respect to the host, similar to the end of the "Magdil" section, where we do the same as a form of necessary respect toward Hashem (the object of our ...


7

The words of Rav Abadi's version can be found as a PDF here (although the vowels are somewhat corrupted) in the text of the Teshuva (Or Yitzchak I OC 59) where he discusses the permissibility of using a shortened version.


7

See Har Tz'vi (OC 1:163) where he discusses this issue. He first quotes the Panim M'iros (2:27), Chasam Sofer (OC 127), and the Minchas Chinuch (313), who hold that hana'as mei'av is a necessary criterion for birkas hamazon. Therefore, these opinions hold, if someone ate half of a k'zayis, then vomited it up, then ate another half k'zayis, he would be exempt ...


7

Kolbo (quoted by Beis Yosef 387) says not to say פותח את ידך for how could we bring a verse Dovid Hamelech said with the words of Moshe Rabeynu. However the Beis Yosef himself rebuts his reasoning (without explanation). The Ram"a in Darchei Moshe there says the custom is not to say it. According to the Mabi"t (Sha'ar Hayesodos Perek 61) these words actually ...


7

This is pretty common in old* Siddurim. You can see omitting just ועל בריתך שחתמת בבשרינו on Hebrewbooks here here here here and here and on Hebrewmanuscripts.org manuscript #747. You can see omitting that phrase plus ועל תורתך שלימדתנו on Hebrewbooks here and on Hebrewmanuscripts.org manuscript #1762. This siddur is not clear how much exactly to omit. *...


6

Many thanks to Menachem who, in a comment on the question, gave references to some of the following, which led me also to the others: The Avudraham (Abudirham) says that only the leader of a zimun (the m'zamen) says it, and has a different nusach (wording): Baruch hu uvaruch zichro l'olme ad. (Many thanks to Menachem for finding this!) The Tur, OC 192 (and ...


6

Nit'ei Gavriel (Aveilus, vol. 1, 100:3 and footnotes) cites several views on the subject. One is that this version is meant to be said only when there is a minyan for bentching, which doesn't happen very often (except perhaps on Shabbos, but then there other views - cited in the next paragraph - that it shouldn't be recited then anyway). Another is that by ...


6

In my Sefer Ish Emunot (Orah Haim 1:25) I wrote a pretty lengthy discussion about this. First of all, we have to know the Mishna Berura (Orah Haim 1:11) brings the Shela (Shaar HaOtiot 85a) that brings down to say Al Naharot on days when Tahanun is said. However, on days where it is omitted, he says to say Beshuv Hashem etc (sources to support the M"B - Kaf ...


6

Yes, the brachas don't always go hand-in-hand. For instance, let's assume (but check with your rabbi) that one piece of pizza is a "snack", and two makes a meal. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch rules (about pseudo-bread items, let's assume pizza is such an item) that if you decide you only want one piece of pizza, you make a mezonot then eat it. If you then change ...


6

The nussach comes from the original procedure of Zimun. The Ba'al HaBayit - if he so wishes - honors one of those present with Zimun - so that the latter reciprocates with the Birkat Ore'ach. To acknowledge this permission-granted, in Nussach Ashkenaz, the honoree says "with permission of the Ba'al HaBayit" - Birshut Ba'al HaBayit. So refusing permission ...


6

The relevant Gemara here is on Megilla 23b. The Mishna there lists a number of things which require a Minyan. The Gemara explains that "all Devarim SheBikdusha" require a Minyan (based on some verses). It then gives reasons for requiring a Minyan in the last few instances of the Mishna (including Zimmun beShem and Birkat Chatanim), namely, that it isn't ...


6

The Italian nusach Bnei Roma omits ועל בריתך שחסמת בבשרנו for women.


6

This is discussed in the Sefer ליקוטי שושנים on page 13. Essentially he answers: Since we bless Hashem during the Birkat Hamazon (Grace After Meals), there's no need to first bless Him before doing the Mitzva. There's no need to make a Bracha on a Bracha, since the point of making the Bracha is taken care of as we say the actual Bracha. Similarly we don'...


6

A similar question is when Rosh Chodesh is on Sunday, do we say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo" in bentching of Shalosh Seudos? There the answer (see Mishna Berura Siman 188 Sif Katan 33) is that it's a sofek (a doubt) and so we don't, unless you would eat at least a kazis of bread after tzeis when it's definitely night and then you would definitely say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo." ...


6

It's Shulchan Arukh OC 272:10 ברכת יין של קידוש פוטרת יין שבתוך הסעודה ואינו טעון ברכה לאחריו דברכת המזון פוטרתו בין שהוא על הכוס בין שאינו על הכוס.‏ The blessing on wine for Kiddush exempts wine during the meal [from needing a blessing before drinking] and the wine does not need a blessing afterwards for the blessings after bread exempt it, whether ...


6

The BT (Ber. 55a) cites R. Yitzhak who stated that one should not be appointed over a community without having the community consulted with first. For precedent, he refers to a communication between God, Moses and Israel on the appointment of Bezalel: אמר רבי יצחק אין מעמידין פרנס על הצבור אלא אם כן נמלכים בצבור שנא' (שמות לה, ל) ראו קרא ה' בשם בצלאל אמר ...


6

As I’ve alluded to previously in this forum, I’m highly allergic to gluten and therefore can only eat oat if I want to make a HaMotzi. As oat bread is absolutely nasty (and expensive), I only have it on Shabbos and Yom Tov, so this question is very relevant to me. I’ve therefore asked this previously to my Rabbis, and the answer that I got is that there is ...


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