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8

in the Sifra (Behar): יכול אף על פי שלא השרישו? תלמוד לומר שש שנים תזרע שדך... ואספת ששה זרעים וששה אסיפים לא שישה זרעים ושבעה אסיפים To understand the Midrash Tanaim, I looked in the commentary of Rabbi Aaron Iben Chaim - called "Korban Haaron" (Lived in Fez about four hundred and fifty years) the book is strongly recommended. The Sifra ask: Can we ...


7

There is certainly a derasha, as given in the other answer. But on a peshat level, there is also a straightforward answer. It is beautiful and poetic. And it resonates. There is a certain Biblical style here, carried through in the next phrases and in the next verses. This is carried out by meter, syllable count, by parallelism, and repeated syntactic ...


6

There was a korban omer even during shemitah. (Otherwise, how could one have eaten from chodosh in chutz la'aretz?) It came ideally from the "sefiach" (self-seeded produce); though if that wasn't available, it was imported from Suryah, or, if still necessary, planted in Israel and offered on the Altar (but not eaten by the priests). As such, all the related ...


6

It does occur sometimes in Midrashei Halacha. See for example Bava Kamma 10b: תשלומי נזק מלמד שהבעלים מטפלין בנבילה מנא הני מילי אמר ר' אמי דאמר קרא (ויקרא כד, יח) מכה נפש בהמה ישלמנה אל תקרי ישלמנה אלא ישלימנה ‘“To compensate for damage" imports that the owners [plaintiffs] have to retain the carcass as part payment’. What is the authority for this ...


4

Based on Be'er Yosef to Leviticus 25:1-3 There’s a Midrash which analyzes 1 a verse in Psalms 2. The verse describes גיבורי כוח, the mighty ones of strength, who follow Hashem’s word. Who does this refer to? The Midrash says that it refers to those who observe the mitzvah of shemittah. Why are these people called mighty ones of strength? If ...


3

Rashi actually addresses this issue. (Sources from Sefaria.org) ושבתם איש אל אחזתו. שֶׁהַשָּׂדוֹת חוֹזְרוֹת לְבַעְלֵיהֶן And you shall return each man to his inheritance: (meaning) that the fields return to their (original) owners (ואיש אל משפחתו תשבו. לְרַבּוֹת אֶת הַנִּרְצָע (קידושין ט"ו And each man to his family shall you return: to include in ...


3

We are slaves to Hashem (G-d) in that we are obligated to keep His commandments, and we don't have a choice. We are not slaves to a human being, but to G-d. 'כי לי בני ישראל עבדים, עבדי הם' (ויקרא כ"ה, נה), ולא עבדים לעבדים For the Children of Israel are slaves to Me, they are My slaves (Lev. 25:55), and not slaves to slaves (other human beings). (...


2

Ramban here answers that Shemittah was used as an example since it was stated briefly/generally at the time of Matan Torah (in Mishpatim), and the details were said later. This example shows us that all Mitzvos which were only mentioned backhandedly (or not at all) at that time in the Torah, but were explained later on, were really all explained in detail at ...


2

Aleinu LeShabeiach, based on the teachings of Rav Zilberstein, quotes two answers to this question (p. 394-395): The Chasam Sofer explains that the reason shemittah and Mount Sinai are juxtaposed is because shemittah is a clear proof that the Torah was given by Hashem, and not fabricated by Moshe Rabbeinu, chas v’shalom. For what human being would dare to ...


1

Ralbag, seen here, suggests that it is not the particular Mitzvah itself that warrants this statement, rather it's placement in the order of the Torah. He writes: Since the narrative was interrupted with details about the one who cursed, which was not something said at Har Sinai, the Torah reiterated that this mitzvah was in fact said at Har Sinai. ...


1

It is talking about those relatives who would normally inherit his property. Lineage follows the paternal (male) line. Thus, moving up the line of inheritance, if his "brothers" cannot redeem him, the next closest line are the brothers of his father (his uncle) and the uncle's descendants (his cousins). For example see the halacha of the ancestral portion ...


1

Regarding "ought it be used": R' Zushya of Anipoli says that it displays a lack in trust in Hashem as a Father to worry that He would command us to not plant and then not provide for us. (He writes that if we wouldn't ask, there would be plenty without a specific blessing from Hashem (I don't claim to know how that works).) I once heard a parsha shiur ...


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