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15

The debatable: Kabbalistic sources about beards, or about spiritually-destructive forces involved in removing a beard. Much ink has been spilled over how much facial hair was worn by the kabbalist Rabbi Menachem Azariah of Fano. Cutting your beard means you're trying to look like a non-Jew. Chasam Sofer vehemently opposes this argument, observing that in ...


10

R Shlomo Aviner, in Shut She'elat Shlomo, mentions 4 reasons, which are brought here in short: The gmara in Shabbat 152a, says that the splendor of man's face is the beard הדרת פנים זקן. That's the natural and whole looks of the Israeli man, as R Yehonatan Aibeshitz mentions in Ya'art Dvash, part A. The daily shaving is bothersome and causes bitul torah (...


8

The Ramchal's beardless face is referenced in several letters among the Italian rabbinic communities of the 18th century, all of which are part of the general controversy that escalated after the Ramchal's assertion of learning through a maggid and his teachings of kabbalah, both activities that led some to suspect him of being a secret follower of Shabbetai ...


7

I assume that most people, besides Jews, also had beards, since it is a natural phenomenon that male humans have beards. At some point in time it became common for many men to shave them, and as mentioned by @Danny Schoemann, this was inconvenient for most Jews, and is still frowned upon by many for halachic reasons, so they are still more prevalent in ...


7

There is an old Kabbalistic idea discussed here to place them inside a Sefer! Many Poskim have decried this practice, including R' Ovadia Yosef who is quoted in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Yalkut Yosef 153:17: וכל שכן שאסור להצניע בתוך ספרי קודש שערות הזקן


6

I found the source I was looking for ,it is from the Chofetz Chaim in his Kuntres Tiferes Adam (on the issur of shaving ). He writes that he remembers that when a Jew took a vow he would do so with his beard and payos.


6

The pamphlet makes a great case but it overstates it a bit. Yabia Omer 9:10 speaks for itself. Initially Rav Ovadia believed it was asur but seeing that the minhag of tremendous segments of klal yisrael including the most religious (see there for examples such as the Or Letzion and students in Radin) he was compelled to write his teshuva. He is adamantly ...


5

According to Shemirat Shabbat K'Hilchato as cited here, there is a leniency regarding oil, which is how Wikipedia describes this product: Regarding applying hair cream on Shabbat, Shemirat Shabbat Kehilkhatah writes that one may be lenient and apply hair oil, but only in small quantities so that one should not come to squeeze it out of the hair. ...


5

The following picture, from this page which has since gone down, depicts all the opinions with pictures as to where exactly those five points are. Translation of the Hebrew text: Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah), siman 181:11: The corners of the beard are five, and there are a multitude of opinions (as to what they are). Therefore one who fears heaven should ...


4

You ascertained: How did our Sages come up with the halacha (or rather idea) that using scissors (or appliances that do not cut the root like most electric shavers) does not constitute 'destroying the corner of the beard'? And you said the source was: Leviticus 19:27 states, "You shall not round off the side-growth on your head, or destroy the side-growth ...


4

Answer to Q.What does Jewish thought say about people with little to no beards? “You shall not round off the corner of your head, and you shall not destroy the edge of your beard.” Leviticus 19:27. Then in the context of the laws of the priests, we read: “…nor shall they shave the edge of their beard…” Leviticus 21:5. The idea is not to have a long beard, ...


4

The Torah commands us (Vayikra 19:27) not to use a razor on one's beard. לֹא תַקִּפוּ פְּאַת רֹאשְׁכֶם וְלֹא תַשְׁחִית אֵת פְּאַת זְקָנֶךָ: ‏ As a result, Jews can trim their beards but not shave them, as documented in Shulchan Aruch יורה דעה in סימן קפא - אסור גלוח הפאות י: אֵינוֹ חַיָּב עַל הַשְׁחָתַת פְּאַת הַזָּקָן אֶלָּא בְּתַעַר, אֲבָל ...


4

The halachos that you are quoting are based on the sefer Hadras Ponim - Zokon chapter 9. His main argument, or that of his sources, is that depilatory paste would violate both giluach (shaving) and hashchasa (destruction) of the hair. The destruction part is obvious; his main point is that the depilatory is called shaving and you don't need a cutting ...


4

To answer the title but not the body of your question, the Raddak who lived 1160–1235 in Narbonne, Provence, mentions that in his times in the lands where he lived the minhag was to not keep a beard. See Samuel 2 10 5. In fact his words there are apologetically trying to explain why in Dovid's times, when everyone had beards, it was embarrassing not to have ...


3

The first source saying that Ramchal “did not let his beard grow” was his early teacher and later critic Rabbi Yosef Ergas. See here for a translation of the quote: https://books.google.com/books?id=t99ZDQAAQBAJ&pg=PT16&lpg=PT16&dq=ramchal+ergas+beard&source=bl&ots=OKjh_tt6fn&sig=WexVimwXrr42iDdVCt_JlPjczps&hl=en&sa=X&ved=...


2

I'd say there's no problem because you can't pick the connected hair. Borrer is when you pick the Psolet (or what you don't want) out of the food (what you do want). It's like picking a shoe that happens to be in the middle of a row of other shoes that are nailed to the floor. A more Talmudic could-be-proof, is from Mishna Beitza 23a: רבי יהודה אומר אין ...


2

If I were to break down this question to its bare essentials, I would ask: Does the rabbi make the Jew, or does the Jew make the rabbi? In other words, if we see our life as a journey in which we try to move spiritually upon our current plane and attempt to raise ourselves to new levels, can it be that the rabbi who started us on our path is the one with ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh De'ah 181:13) strongly suggests not to do so, since nobody really knows the Biblical boundaries fo the beard; if you guess wrongly, then you've transgressed a Biblical prohibition by crossing that boundary. פאות הזקן הם ה' ורבו בהם הדעות לפיכך ירא שמים יצא את כולם ולא יעביר תער על כל זקנו כלל (ואפילו תחת הגרון) (ב"י בשם אגרת ר"י ...


2

The question actually involves whether the laser is considered a "blade" that cuts the hair or a "fire" that burns the hair off. However, the gemoro in nazir talks about the hashchasa (destruction) of the beard as being forbidden which would mean that the use of the laser is similar to the cutting of the hair by a razor. Note that even a razor is not "...


2

TL;DR: It would seem to depend on whether one is of the opinion that gilu’ach ("shaving") & hashchasah ("destroying the hair") are prohibited regardless of the device used (ie scissors would be forbidden) OR whether one is of the opinion gilu’ach & hashchasah ONLY applies to a razor (ie scissors would be permitted). There's a great OUKosher ...


2

The gemara you reported in Nazir 40a taught that Leviim, Nazir and Metsora have a mitsva to shave with a blade(1). This is a Mitsvat asse, the Mitsvat asse pushes out the mitsvat lo taasse, the prohibition of shaving beard with a blade for metsora and leviim who need to shave the beard and of shaving temporal scalp for the nazir who shave the scalp only. ...


1

This question is "consult your Rabbi" question. That being said, During six-days war, soldiers were asked to shave their beards so gas-masks will fit better. Rabbi Shlomo Goren resisted that ,and it was concluded that every soldier will decide for himself. I also found somebody who says that during the gulf wars many people and rabbis shaved their beards, ...


1

You are misquoting!!!! Regarding sideburns that Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah 181) says that there is an opinion that one may not use scissors that cut the hair very short, and one should act in this manner. א פְּאוֹת הָרֹאשׁ הֵם שְׁתַּיִם. סוֹף הָרֹאשׁ הוּא מְקוֹם חִבּוּרוֹ לַלֶּחִי מִיָּמִין וּמִשְּׂמֹאל.‏ ב בֵּין שֶׁגִּלַּח הַפֵּאוֹת בִּלְבַד, ...


1

Waxing to shave is permitted in general, see e.g., here from R Zev Farber According to the halacha [...] it is forbidden for a man to shave off the hair of his temples or to shave off the corners of his beard. Both of these rules apply only to shaving with a razor. Using a depilating cream, a waxing process, or just pulling the hair out by hand ...


1

Many Orthodox Jews, including Hasidism, refrain from cutting their beards altogether, and, with the exception of occasionally trimming their mustaches when they interfere with eating, never cut their facial hair. Those Orthodox Jews who do shave their facial hair must utilize electric shavers as opposed to razors. To your question if plucking falls under ...


1

In my experience, different communities have different practices with regard to shaving. (Note that when I talk about "shaving" in this answer, I mean cutting the beard with a permitted shaving device. Not a straight razor which is forbidden.) In general, Hasidic Jews (including teenagers) tend not to shave at all. My understanding is that this is for ...


1

See this article . My inference from this is that considering that there was a debate regarding shaving in general, plus even for those opinions that prohibit shaving, there's a debate if that means only the beard, there are leniencies to rely upon regarding shaving your neck. As there is no consensus, from what I can tell, CYLOR. If you DO shave your neck,...


1

In addition to the previous answers, I have heard (I will try to add sources when possible) that it is not recommended to put them in a Sefer that does not belong to you, as it is repulsive to the other users, and Putting it in a Sefer only makes sense if you generally treat your beard as having a certain kedusha. I.e. one who regularly trims his beard ...


1

When I was in the conversion process all new comers to shul will think I was the shul's Rabbi as I habe a natural beard but his was trimmed. Of course the impression wouldn't last as my lack of Hebrew have me away. It wasn't my idea to look more Jewish than most congregants buti felt not looking Jewish enough was hindering and slowing the process. I never ...


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