9

The Rambam writes in Hilchot Sotah 3:8 Afterwards, a scroll of parchment from a kosher animal, like the parchment used for a Torah scroll is brought. R Eliyahu Touger explains "the Jerusalem Talmud (Sotah 2:4) states that the parchment must be made from the hide of a kosher animal, lest the woman refuses to drink and the passage be required to be ...


8

No. They were not reincarnated. Genesis 38- they're being mentioned in the present tense of the story. Numbers 26- after the plague that killed many people in Klal Yisrael (see previous chapter), the Torah takes a census of the people remaining by going through each of the 12 tribes. Since the Torah is starting from Yehuda and discusses his descendants,...


8

I think you made a calculation error here, because when I add them up I get 603,550 as the passuk says. Note that 40,500 is exactly the number of people in Shevet Ephraim; did you forget to count them in tallying up these numbers?


8

I heard in the name of the "Balei Mussar" that Hashem made it so that no one should be able to taste these items 1) so that it shouldn't be so hard for the women who can't eat it, and 2) to teach everyone to always think about another Jew's hardships. I heard this a while ago; I don't remember the name/names of those who said it. Now I found this ...


8

Rav Zalman Sorotzkin in his אזנים לתורה suggests that they were hinting that they wished to return to Egypt. אשר נאכל במצרים. אשר אכלנו לא אמרו, אלא "אשר נאכל" - בזה טמון רמז דק: "אשר נאכל" אם נשוב מצרימה. ‏ (The possibility of interpreting נאכל as future tense seems to be mostly ignored by the earlier commentators, and רב סעדיה גאון seems to ...


7

Ramban to Numbers 10:35 : וקרא החטא "פורענות" אע"פ שלא אירע להם ממנו פורענות ושמא אלמלא חטאם זה היה מכניסם לארץ מיד Chazal call the sin "punishment" even though no punishment occured, maybe because if not for this sin [Hashem] would have brought them into the land of Israel immediately A friend pointed out to me the Rosh (ad. loc.) gives the ...


7

Rabbi Levi Druk answers this question in the name of the Lubavitcher Rebbe Zatzal. The Lubavitcher Rebbe suggests (Sefer Hasichot, 5750) that Korach had a positive and redeeming quality, in light of which we name the portion after him. Korach’s motive was that he yearned to serve G-d as a Kohen Gadol (Numbers, 16:10), something Moshe himself said he desired ...


6

The Chida (1724—1806) writes in his commentary to Numbers 26:23: לפוה משפחת הפוני. לכאורה הול״ל הפווי. ויש לרמוז כי הפוני רמז ה׳ שהיא מלכות פ״ו גימטריא אלהים נ׳ רמז לן׳ שערי בינה י׳ חכמה ודוק כי קצרתי Of Puvah, the clan of the Punites. In reality it should have said "the Puvites." We can say the "Punites" is an allusion to Hashem's kingship: "pu" (...


6

There are certain cases in which it is appropriate to kill someone, and certain cased in which killing is inappropriate. Typically appropriate killing would be legal executions. For discussion of when extrajudicial killing is justified see here. The quote doesn't say anything about which cases are which. Rather, it says that killing certain people is ...


6

Thank you Fred for sourcing it. The majority opinion in the Talmud is that a warning "this carries the death penalty" is sufficient, without specifying what method of execution. As Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's Living Torah puts it: Since it was not specified what must be done to him, they placed him under guard. The death penalty was specified (Exodus 31:...


6

R. Pinhas Horowitz explains (Panim Yafot Exodus 11:4) that in Egypt they were confident that they would have food in the future.


6

The gemarah in Meilah 18a-b states כי תמעל מעל אין מעל אלא שנוי וכן הוא אומר (במדבר ה, יב) איש איש כי תשטה אשתו ומעלה בו מעל ואומר (דברי הימים א ה, כה) וימעלו באלהי אבותיהם ויזנו אחרי הבעלים [The term] ma'al denotes nothing else but [effecting] a change, and thus it says. If any one's wife go aside and act unfaithfully [ma'al] against him . . ., ...


6

Netziv in HaEmek Davar explains the terms connotes a complete exit from the husbands domain as the husband is now forbidden to have marital relations with her. As noted in another answer Ish can also refer to God (the word Ish is in fact used twice in that verse) and according to the Zohar (3:123a) there is an aspect of sinning against God as well, hence ...


6

Although in the Mishna Me'ilah is of course most associated with using something from the Temple (cf. Leviticus 5:15), in the Bible it is used in the context of multiple sorts of other transgressions. For example, besides for this example of a woman cheating on her husband, it is used in reference to monetary crimes against regular people (Leviticus 5:21), ...


6

Yoma 75b: As it is written: “And they camped by the Jordan from Beth-Jeshimoth to Abel-shittim” (Numbers 33:49), and Rabba bar bar Ḥana said: I saw that site and it was three parasangs in length. According to Wikipedia, one Talmudic parasang is equivalent to 2.41 - 2.85 miles. So three parasangs are in the region of 7.2 - 8.6 miles.


5

I cannot find this in the Vilna edition of Numbers Rabba. As noted by @Rish, it is mentioned by Hida who says that he heard this was a teaching of Hazal,[i] in his Homat Anakh (Parashat B'ha'alot'kha: 6) זכרנו את הדגה. מכאן שמדליקין נרות בשבת We remembered the fish: From here we see that we light candles on Shabbat. This seems to be an example of ...


4

Rav Hirsch in his commentary on the Chumash (ad loc and Vayikra 5:15,21) explains (I am paraphrasing) that this term was used because it relates to the robe of the Kohanim, the meil. The wife was entrusted to act faithfully, just like the Kohen who wears the meil and works in the temple, but with her actions she has shown that she is only 'wearing the ...


4

@Mevaqesh posted an excellent answer - I'm just posting this to clarify the points made by commenters, as well as to add a fantastic source to this discussion, which Mevaqesh reminded me of. The contrast between the Meilah you refer to and the Meilah in a Sotah is based on who the Meilah is against (we can use the accepted definition of taking or of ...


4

The Ramban says that the reason the hashka'as sotah is the only mitzva in the Torah where we rely on a nes is because it relates to the purity of the lineage of klal yisrael which is a pre-requisite for the hashra'as ha'shechinah. Therefore it follows that parshas sotah should be stated subsequently to the formation of the machaneh because Hashem was only ...


4

Tzara'at, the skin affliction, is understood by Chazal as a punishment for lashon hara, evil speech. This article from Bar-Ilan University cites the Sifra (5:7), Avot D'rabbi Natan (version A Chapter 9), Arachin 15b, and several Amoraim. What was the lashon hara? it was when Miriam and Aharon spoke against Moshe in 12:1. Rashi says on this: Miriam and ...


4

See Rashi, Devarim 10:6, who explains pretty much the same thing the Yerushalmi in @Fred's answer says, but adds that this was part of the rebuke that Moshe gave the Jews: And the children of Israel journeyed from the wells of B’nei Ya’akan to Moserah: What is the relevance of this here? Furthermore, did they really journey from the wells of B’nei Ya’akan ...


4

Different commentaries (such as the Ibn Ezra and the Ramban) on the verse in D'varim address the issue in different ways, but I'll produce a rough translation of the Y'rushalmi (Sotah 1:10), which discusses the two passages (please pardon any mistakes in this hasty translation): It is written (Shmuel II, 1:18): "And David eulogized this elegy… and he ...


3

Many commentaries go case-by-case through each of the "terrible mistakes" of the Jews in the desert and explain how they are not as terrible as they seem. For example, by the sin of the Golden Calf, the Ramban explains (32:1) that they did not want to create an idol to serve, but rather to appoint a new leader, a Moshe replacement, to lead them now that ...


3

While it is impossible to know with certainty what the Tanhuma was thinking, I think that the following is a likely explanation. Numbers (15:38-9) states: וְעָשׂוּ לָהֶם צִיצִת עַל-כַּנְפֵי בִגְדֵיהֶם, לְדֹרֹתָם; וְנָתְנוּ עַל-צִיצִת הַכָּנָף, פְּתִיל תְּכֵלֶת: וְהָיָה לָכֶם, לְצִיצִת, וּרְאִיתֶם אֹתוֹ וּזְכַרְתֶּם אֶת-כָּל-מִצְו‍ֹת יְהוָה, וַעֲשִׂיתֶם ...


2

1. Focusing on the question of when the twentieth birthday had to fall, Rashi to Bamidbar 14:33 writes that the decree was such that the men died when they had entered their 60th year. This means that anyone who was aged 20 at the time of the Golden Calf (over a year prior) would eventually die in the desert, but not anyone who was not then 20, even though ...


2

The Gemara in Eiruvin 19a brings from Rav Yirmiyahu Ben Elazar who explains that there are 3 different entrances to gehenom. One entrance is located in the desert which swallowed up Korach and his family. The second location is in the sea,and the 3rd location is in Jerusalem. The gemara then asks is there really only 3 openings? Dont we say that gehenom is ...


2

The Sefer קורות הדורות [זילבר] חלק ב' דף ל"ז has a nice timeline in Hebrew. For all the footnotes and more details, you would want to see the sefer itself.


2

Rabbeinu Tam (Tosfos Bava Basra 121a 'yom shekalu') suggests that 15,000 people who were originally supposed to die during the last year were spared (including Yehoshua and Kalev). Shlumiel could very possibly have been among them.


2

According to Rashi, peshuto shel Mikra (the actual meaning), there's nothing that points to him actually being Shlumiel ben Tzurishaddai in the literal sense (in fact, the opposite is implied when Rashi mentions that he was the head of only one family) and seemingly the Gemara in Sanhedrin (82b) is seen as Agadeta. Aggadeta is not necessarily the posheter ...


2

This interestingly phrased question of Korach appears in two other sources. Badmibar Rabbah 18:3 קָפַץ קֹרַח וְאָמַר לְמשֶׁה טַלִּית שֶׁכֻּלָּהּ תְּכֵלֶת מַהוּ שֶׁתְּהֵא פְּטוּרָה מִן הַצִּיצִית, אָמַר לוֹ חַיֶּיבֶת בְּצִיצִית. אָמַר לוֹ קֹרַח טַלִית שֶׁכֻּלָּהּ תְּכֵלֶת אֵין פּוֹטֶרֶת עַצְמָהּ, אַרְבָּעָה חוּטִין פּוֹטְרוֹת אוֹתָהּ As well as Yerushalmi ...


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