12

There is something like you mention in the Talmud Yerushalmi in Demai 7:1: Rebbi and Rabbi Yossi were invited as guests to eat at the home of a certain man. However, the Rabbis suspected that he did not properly tithe the food being served, and they wanted to attempt to tithe the food secretly. Their suspicion was noticed by another man who told the owner ...


8

The gemara in Shabbos says (140b) בל תשחית דגופא עדיף Damaging (lit. בל תשחית [lit. destruction]) of one's body is more important [than בל תשחית of food] (translation mine) Seems pretty simple that if overeating is harmful to a person's body (which it is), it should be avoided even at the cost of wasting food.


8

I found one mention of throwing food in the gemara - but in general there is a law not to waste food and thus the whole idea of throwing away and spoiling food goes against the Torah ethic. The gemara in Shabbat 105b brings a story of Rav Sheshet who threw small fish on his maidservant’s head to instill fear in the members of his household by pretending to ...


6

See here Rambam (Melachim 6:8) writes that if the tree is causing any type of damage, one may destroy it. While the Kaf Hachaim (YD 116:85) writes that one shouldn't destroy a fruit tree to build an extension, most poskim allow one to (See Rosh, Bava Kama 91b; Aruch Hashulchan ibid; Yabia Omer ibid). R’ Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer YD 5:12:5) writes that even ...


5

The Mishna in Pesachim 2:1 records a dispute as to how Biur Chametz is to be done. Rabbi Yehuda, comparing the destruction of Chametz to the destruction of invalid Korbanot, rules that Chametz must be destroyed by burning. The Chachamim there argue and rule that any form of destruction (tossing into the sea, or crumbling it into the wind) is acceptable. The ...


4

It is only prohibited to cut down trees for no purpose, but what "purpose" includes is hard to define. Rambam Laws of Kings 6:9 deals with your case directly, however: כל אילן סרק מותר לקוץ אותו ואפילו אינו צריך לו. וכן אילן מאכל שהזקין ואינו עושה אלא דבר מועט שאינו ראוי לטרוח בו. מותר לקוץ אותו. It is permissible to cut down any non-fruit bearing ...


4

Orach Chaim 172:2 - you should remove the candy from your mouth and make a Bracha. If it is chewed and unappetizing to remove, you may push it to the side of your mouth and make a Bracha.


4

Rabbi Binyomin Gruber* told me personally that it is better to throw out food than to overeat. * Best reference to know who he is that I could find, if someone has a better one, please share


3

The Gemara in Bava Kamma 91b discusses this: אמר רב דיקלא דטען קבא אסור למקצציה מיתיבי כמה יהא בזית ולא יקצצו רובע שאני זיתים דחשיבי א"ר חנינא לא שכיב שיבחת ברי אלא דקץ תאינתא בלא זמנה אמר רבינא ואם היה מעולה בדמים מותר תניא נמי הכי (דברים כ, כ) רק עץ אשר תדע זה אילן מאכל כי לא עץ מאכל הוא זה אילן סרק וכי מאחר שסופו לרבות כל דבר מה ת"ל כי לא עץ מאכל ...


3

See Shulchan Aruch (OC 171:1): שלא לנהוג בזיון באוכלים ואין זורקים הפת משום בזיון אוכלים וכשם שאין זורקין את הפת כך אין זורקין אוכלי' הנמאסים ע"י זריקה אבל מידי דלא ממאיס כגון אגוזים ורימונים וחבושים שרי: One should not do disrespectful things with food. One should not throw bread, because it is disrespectful of the food. And just as ...


3

Rambam Melachim 6.10 says wasting other items not just fruit trees: וְלֹא הָאִילָנוֹת בִּלְבַד. אֶלָּא כָּל הַמְשַׁבֵּר כֵּלִים. וְקוֹרֵעַ בְּגָדִים. וְהוֹרֵס בִּנְיָן. וְסוֹתֵם מַעְיָן. וּמְאַבֵּד מַאֲכָלוֹת דֶּרֶךְ הַשְׁחָתָה. עוֹבֵר בְּלֹא תַשְׁחִית. וְאֵינוֹ לוֹקֶה אֶלָּא מַכַּת מַרְדּוּת מִדִּבְרֵיהֶם Not only trees but breaking tools, ripping ...


3

Background: The gemara you're referencing is part of a series on Shabbos 140b about Rav Chisda giving sound economic advice. For example: since bundles of vegetables & sticks all cost the same, Rav Chisda suggests that one should buy a long bundle to get more bang for their buck. In the middle of Rav Chisda's list of economic advice, Rav Papa ...


3

Rabbeinu Yonah is not recommending we waste food. He is recommending we utilize some of each meal to practice self-restraint. Developing our ability to say "no" to a physical desire is no less important of a usage than consuming food to sustain our bodies and keep on living. After all, if we are weak in the ability to control such desires (taavos), how often ...


3

There appears to be an independent prohibition to throw out bread, and doing so could cause one to become poor (cf. Shabbos 143a, Tosfos to Brachos 52b) due to the respect and appreciation that we should have towards Hashem's sustenance that He has provided (cf. Aruch Hashulchan 180:4, Kaf HaHayyim 24:47-48). This rule-of not discarding bread with the rest ...


3

Kaf Hachayim 445:11 quotes that kabbalistically it is preferable to burn the chometz as it symbolizes the destruction of the Yetzer Harah. The Rashash (Pesachim 21b) suggests, according to one opinion, that eating chometz accomplishes burning it, since the heat of your body is like burning. And אדם כי עץ השדה, a man is like a tree, so you even get the ...


3

The underlying theoretical justification - Pikuach Nefesh, saving lives by preventing attacks - is where it would come from. Whether or not this behavior accomplishes that in this context is another matter. The most interesting aspect of the question is if the victim of the "Price-Tag" attack is decidedly not an aggressor, just happens to be in the same ...


2

Per Halachafortoday.com Q: In reference to today’s question about baal tashchis vs. achilas gasa- I always have a similar question, how can one throw out food that became unusable due to kabalistic reasons (a peeled onion, food under a bed that someone slept on, a drink left uncovered over night) does the kabbalistic reason overrule baal tashchis ...


2

The laws vary from place to place. Many caterers have deals with charities to pick up the leftovers. As such, you really need to ask. Personally, I have asked a caterer for leftover pineapple boats, which I was happily given. (Dried pineapple is delicious!) To answer specifically: "Is it considered, then, a mitzvah to take these cakes as we know they will ...


2

Actually, (based on a Gemara) the Kitzur in סימן עז - דיני הקדוש והסעודות בלילה וביום states that one is supposed to leave over wine from the night Kiddush to the morning one, and for the morning for Havdala. סעיף ז' הַכּוֹס צָרִיךְ לִהְיוֹת שָׁלֵם וְנָקִי. וְכָל הַדִּינִים שֶׁהֵן בַּכּוֹס שֶׁל בִּרְכַּת הַמָּזוֹן (לְעֵיל סִימָן מ"ה סָעִיף ג' וְסָעִיף ...


2

Your mouth should be empty when saying a bracha: We learn this from the passuk: (Tehillim 71:8) Let my mouth be filled with Your praise ימלא פי תהילתך The emphasis is on our mouths not having something else inside, so that they are only filled with G-d's praise and nothing else - it would seem to me irrelevant whether it was food or something else. (I ...


1

The Gemora in Eiruvin 53b mentions this practice of leaving food at the corner of the plate for the shamash (attender) to eat his portion (also see Shulchan Aruch OC 170,3): אמר רבי יהושע בן חנניה...פעם אחת נתארחתי אצל אכסניא אחת עשתה לי פולין ביום ראשון אכלתים ולא שיירתי מהן כלום שנייה ולא שיירתי מהן כלום ביום שלישי הקדיחתן במלח כיון שטעמתי משכתי ידי מהן ...


1

An additional source in the Talmud is an incident mentioned in Ta'anit 24b where Rabbi Yehuda saw two people throwing bread, which upset him to the extent that a famine occurred.


1

This article starts from the point that the Torah Devorim 20:19 prohibits destroying fruit trees during a siege. It goes on to say: The general prohibition against needless destruction, derived from the verse on fruit trees, concerns not destroying directly or indirectly anything that may be of use to people. The Talmudic sage Rabbi Yishmael ...


1

from below i see that it is forbidden to destroy a kezais (olive size) of bread and it is permitted to destroy bread less then a kizais but in a respectful way talmud brochois 52b ... the crumbs which are as large as an olive and leaves those which are smaller than an olive. This supports the dictum of R. Johanan; for R. Johanan said: It is permissible to ...


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