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I don't see it as a "punishment" any more than one is punished by having to read Shakespeare in his Elizabethan English, rather than in an "updated" text. It's not because the language is sacred, it's because that's the one that it was written in. After all, every translation is a commentary; are you really satisfied with limiting yourself to those composed ...


11

According to Tiferes Yisroel the gemara was redacted multiple times by Ravina and Rav Ashi. The reformatted the words to make them more contemporary. The Masechtos they didn't get around to have uncommon words. But apparently even they didn't pull off a complete switcharoo. Over those centuries Latin and other languages were interpolated. But no complete ...


10

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


8

I have learned the entire Mishna based on the Yad Avraham series in English. I also own much of the newer Schottenstein Edition of the Mishna. Here are a few thoughts I found the introductions to each tractate to be incredibly well done and useful. Just reviewing the introductions to all tractates would be in itself wonderful learning. I compared the ...


7

I have learned with both the Koren and the Artscroll. I actually switched to the Koren Steinsaltz. I have been using it everyday to learn daf yomi for 2 years. It really depends what your looking for if one is better than the other. As far as explanation, I would not label Koren a review Gemorah. While Artscroll is known for it's explanation, Koren has a lot ...


7

Aramaic is actually one of the biblical languages (Daniel, Ezra/Nehemia) and even has words in the Pentateuch (e.g. "ygar sahadutha" by the treaty of Lavan and Yaakov). The Maharal interprets the unique significance of Aramaic and advocates that shnayim mikra v'echad targum specifically employ Targum Onkelos for this reason. (In seeming contrast, the gemara ...


6

It uses this order because that is the traditional Nusach it is using. The Ramo justifies this in O.C. 46:9, see here for additional sources, primarily the Maharil and the Maharam MiRottenburg, both Ashkenazi poskim, so it is not surprising to see that arrangement in an Ashkenazi Nusach.


6

I am rather surprised at the answers here. There is nothing wrong with learning gemoro in English. But the fact is, it was written in Aramaic. Anyone who has learned meforshim will tell you that each word is 'counted'. There are no superfluous words. Every word contains a chiddush! No one can write like that today, so the English translation is not like the ...


6

Your question is an interesting one. I researched this article on The Be'urei Hatefilah site (I highly recommend it, as it's one for the best resources on the web for Tefillah-related articles and insights.) My understanding is that there is some controversy. I recommend you read the whole article, but I will excerpt Sefer Avudraham - Dinei Kri'at ...


6

1) הַטֵּה אֱלֹהַי אָזְנְךָ וּשְׁמָע is just a quote from Daniyel 9:18 and there is no Patach there. If you're seeing a Chataf-Patach in some editions, realize that's just an old fashioned way of indicating a Shva Na. So everyone really agrees this is a Shva Na. 2) ריבה ריב[]‏ exists multiple times in Tehillim (35:1, 43:1, 74:22, 119:154) and is always ...


5

The only such 'real' (cantillation) vertical bar in the three paragraphs of "Sh'ma" appears before the word "echad" in the first pasuk. (It represents a p'sik.) (Source: two good-quality chumashim.)


4

According to an interview, the name comes because the publisher made fancy ketubot: Y.H. [interviewer]: If I remember correctly, ArtScroll started off publishing fancy high-end kesubos… N[osson] S[cherman of ArtScroll]: Yes, ArtScroll’s name came from that. Meir Zlotowitz had a company that was involved in such printing.


4

Tol'dos Yitzchak (by Rabbi Yitzchak Karo, uncle of the Bes Yosef) has two explanations: "to tell you whoever sees a sota in her detriment…": its explanation is as a way of a command: he's obliged to swear off of wine, in his seeing her death due to the drinking of wine…. And it is also natural: … "whoever sees a sota in her ...


4

Adam Mintz has written a fine essay called The Talmud in Translation, in which he elaborates on the history of the Artscroll, Steinsaltz, and Soncino Talmuds and the various polemics concerning each. Regarding "rejections," there have been critiques for each Talmud. On the Soncino, there was a little controversy that concerned making the Talmud ...


3

Nusach ashkenaz in artscroll is slightly misleading. 'Nusach ashkenaz' implies the german nusach when really it's minhag polin/lita. So the ashkenaz of artscroll is according to the litvish custom. If you find a siddur that's published in germany or hungary and says "nusach ashkenaz" it will be slightly different


3

I've never heard any objection to Soncino specifically. I've heard objection to translated editions generally — and the very explicatory ArtScroll English edition especially — from teachers: namely, that these editions make it too easy for students to make their way through the g'mara, and the student loses out on the benefits (spiritual and pedagogical) of ...


3

No written source that I know of, but I've been told by Rabbis in the know, that the Lubavitcher Rebbe would kiss his tefilin in uva l'tzion by "v'nizkeh (shel yad), v'nichye (shel rosh), v'nireh (eyes, then lips)". Shouldn't be too hard to trace, though. Plenty of videos of the Rebbe davening.


3

Hagahos Yavetz there says he thinks it means nature, and it is from here that the 'chachmei teva' took the expression. He says there is no other instance of this word in this usage. In Tel Torah the coin explanation is given. He couldn't tell the difference between all the coins in Bavel because they were all similar, kol shekein (how much more so) he ...


3

Sidur Bes Yaakov (Emden) says of this paragraph: אומרו במתון וכונה ושמחה That is: Say it with calmness, direction of thought, and joy.


2

The general point is made here in a Haggada printed in 1907. It doesn't give its source, and doesn't specifically point out how the 9 months fits. Regarding pregnancy, specifically, this is in the Talmud Sotah 11b, although I suppose the emphasis on "carrying pregnancies to term", as opposed to just working to have babies, could be a bit of editorializing by ...


2

See this discussion. Some scholars have claimed that the Zohar's use of Teva to mean "nature" is anachronistic and does not reflect Talmudic usage. In trying to debunk this claim. Rabbi Miller tries to find instances in the Mishnah and Talmud where it means nature. But if it means coinage, then there is no proof. The other answer here points out Hagahos ...


2

It's helpful if said bochurim plan to learn almost any post-Talmudic Torah literature too. Commentaries on the Gemara, commentaries on Shulchan Aruch, responsa, and much else use a lot of Talmudic expressions.


2

In addition to @SabbaHillel's answer, this site appears to show streams flowing into the Dead Sea from all directions:


2

The map on page 923 showing the borders of Eretz Yisrael does not show that line. It appears to be an artifact of the cut and paste method used to create the map or of the boundary line between the east and the west in order to show the three cities of refuge on each side.


2

Wikipedia says the following: In 1975,[1] Zlotowitz, a graduate of Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, was director of a high-end graphics studio in New York.[2] The firm, named ArtScroll Studios,[1] produced brochures,[3] invitations, awards and ketubahs.[1]… The name ArtScroll was chosen for the publishing company to emphasize the visual ...


2

Thank you for contacting us with your inquiry. The text of our Targum Onkelos is from Chumash Toras Elokim (Vilna, 1874) which includes R' Wolf Heidenheim’s text of the Targum; that text is based on manuscripts and is considered מדוייק. We appreciate the opportunity to clarify this. Cover page image from a later email from Artscroll. It's not ...


2

Rav Hirsch in explaining Bereishis 1:1 explains the usage of Shamaim as he had developed it in Jeshurun vol. VIII pg. 274 as the designation of the whole extra-terrestrial world. He then explains the usage in 1:8 as well. Thus, there are different levels called שָׁמַיִם based on what they are being separated from. This then means the highest of those levels. ...


2

(I have to correct one point: the י here isn't a Nach Nistar but an Eim Mikra, like the ה at the end of תורה, the א at the end of ברא or the ו at the end of בו. A real Nach Nistar י would definitely need to be separated, like in ‏[אדני] ימלך לעולם ועד.) You're certainly right that Artscroll is wrong from a classical grammar perspective. The Talmud (...


2

First of all, I subsequently looked at ArtScroll's Bereishis. I could find no reference to the fact that Yishmael repented. They simply brought the commentaries on Rashi which I quoted in the question. Either this is a mistake, or I looked in the wrong spot, or an older version or something. Either way, even though all the commentaries I saw on Rashi say ...


2

If you understand the terms, think "magen" (knowing it means "shield of") when you say magen and Avraham (knowing it means "Abraham") when you say Avraham.


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