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20

Angels are spiritual, not physical, so they don't have a physical appearance. They can, however appear physically in a sort of "disguise", like when the 3 angels came to Abraham disguised as men.


13

The discussion is in the Talmud Sanhedrin 22a. The background is the disagreement among the Rabbis if the Torah was originally in Ivri or Ashuri. The Talmud says that according to the view that it was in Ivri, Ashuri script was first seen when the Angel wrote it on the wall, thus the Jews were not familiar with it - this is why they couldn't read it. ...


10

The painting is called Eine Streitfrage aus dem Talmud (A Talmudic Dispute) by Carl Schleicher. It was painted sometime during the 19th Century in Germany. Here are some other works by him. I could not find much about him on English webpages, but here is a Wikipedia article in Spanish.


8

I have never seen one :) But our Rabbis have told us of at least one characteristic of Angels is that they appear to have one straight foot. The relevance to our daily lives is that when praying the Amidah prayer we are instructed to stand with our legs together in order to resemble Angels. The source for this can be found in the code of Jewish Law A quote ...


8

First, the permission to paint or sculpt is not related to whether we can eat the animal. Some animals are treated more strictly: humans ,eagle, lion and bull. There are differences between representation in relief (3 dimensions) and flat (2 dimensions), and between whether there is a possibility that idolatry might be involved or not e.g. when the ...


7

This illustration appeared on a number of texts from the period: it was the printers' mark of the Bragadini brothers, who for a time (and together with Bomberg) held a virtual monopoly on the publication of Jewish books in Venice. As to whether or not you consider it halakhically sound, bear in mind that (like Bomberg) they weren't Jewish. That same ...


6

Rabbeinu Nissim, when discussing the law surrounding the depiction of angels, describes them as appearing in visions of prophecy as אדם שיש לו כנפים‏, a person who has wings. I have found other descriptions of angels in the Talmud. Before I mention them, I want to stress that while the Sages' words seem to describe some angels in a certain way, there ...


6

Shabbos laws can be very complicated and many activities that might seem innocent enough superficially can be potentially problematic, at a Rabbinic (d'rabanan), or even at a biblical level (d'orayta), which is why it is important to discuss potential activites first with a competent halachic authority. That said, there are e.g. prohibitions on creating ...


5

Maimonides Hil' Avodas Kochavim Ch. 3:10-11: prohibits drawing angels and heavenly bodies, and allows humans two-dimensionally, and other living things even when they are sculptures. the Kesef Mishnah there says that Maimonides is of the opinion that the only exception that can be made is for pedagogical purposes. He also says that Rabbi Isaac Alfasi ...


5

Tzitz Eliezer 9:44:2 says he was asked regarding the flag of Yisaschar, however it is not a question as it was done Al Pi Hadibur - through the word of Hashem.


5

The She'arim Metzuyanim BaHalachah 5:7 concludes that a picture of ervah counts as ervah.


4

It's a clear exception. I heard Rabbi Benjamin Blech suggest that Judaism values education so highly that God made an exception to allow that imagery -- note that the Cherubim had the faces of a young boy and girl. Anything other than this exception, however, would be a problem. The Talmud says that even putting one extra Cherub on the Ark would be in ...


4

The common concept in our current society of an "angel" is that of a person with "feathery" wings. That of a "devil" is that of a person with bat wings and horns. We have the description of the merkava and other descriptions of people with six wings. We also have the description like a person with the legs fused into one pillar. In fact, I have had problems ...


4

To summarize from Yishai's answer, the Talmud says there was something funny about the way it was written; "in columns" is one possible interpretation. Assuming Manasseh ben Israel gave Rembrandt a sketch of what the letters should look like, I'd find it far more likely that Rembrandt was faithful to the sketch he was given (i.e. it was in columns) than that ...


4

see the tur yoreh dea 141 for a larger discussion. Pedagogical purposes is not the only exception. For the rif admittedly it is the only exception but according to the rosh if it is of the public, rather than that of an individual, it is OK. Yissachar's banner was of the public. There is also a distinction between weaving and non-weaving, with weaving what ...


4

Rav Yosef Bechor Shor to 25:31 states clearly that the word "Miksha" comes to exclude the possibility of using a mold, what is referred to by the Torah as "Yetzikah" (see, for example, Shemos 25:12). Based on similar-sounding interpretations by other Rishonim there, I would assume that this is accepted.


3

The relevant quote from Shulchan Aruch Harav is as follows (my own translation): בגדים המצויירים שתולים בכותלי בית הכנסת לנוי אע"פ שמן הדין אין בהם משום חציצה אין נכון להתפלל כנגדם כדי שלא יהא מביט בציורם ולא יכוין בתפלתו ואם יקרה לו להתפלל נגדם יעצים עיניו וגם כשמציירים כותלי בית הכנסת נכון שלא לצייר ציורים נגד פניו של אדם אלא למעלה מקומת איש. ...


3

No, because by using sand in this form it's a form of drawing, which is a biblically prohibited act on shabbat. Even if something is not permanent (for example, writing letters on frost on your window), this would at least be rabinically prohibited.


3

Assuming there are separate receptacles for each light, a menorah can be any shape. However, the the Biur Halacha in siman 671 siff 4 quotes a Maharshal that lighting in a circular utensil is not a hiddur for ner Chanuka. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in siman 139 siff 9 says to make the lights 'straight in a row, not one high and one low'. This has become ...


3

As @DoubleAA suggested, the answer is on the pictures "web title", which I see when resting the mouse on each image. From right to left, you have Gad, Re'uven, Shimon and Ephraim. You don't have a pic for Menashe.


3

I just received an email about a similar question from Yagdil Torah Place: Lausanne, Switzerland. Date: 1963 The Swiss government once decided to put together an exhibition including various artifacts and items of interest which would be displayed before the public. One of the items they wanted to display was a sefer Torah, and they asked Rabbi ...


3

The Shemirah Shabbath by Rav Yehoshua Neuwirth discusses games and toys in Chapter 16. The closest thing to a crafts which he mentions as permissible for children under bar-bat mitzvah age are (18) Toy building blocks and (30) blowing bubbles. In both cases, he seems to say that it is not permissible for an adult to encourage children to do so. ...


2

I just came across one relevant reference regarding synagogue architecture ועל אותן אשר מתכוונים לעשות בנין בשמונה צלעות (ומכל שכן בארבעה צלעות) כדמות היכלי הגוים, עליהם אני קורא וישכח ישראל עושהו ויבן היכלות ע”ש, ובפרט בבנינים כמו היכלי עכו”ם יש גם כן לאו של תורה, ובחוקותיהם לא תלכו, כמו שנתבאר רמב”ם פרק י”א מהלכות עכו”ם הלכה א’, וביו”ד סימן קע”ח ...


2

The Ramchal (there is a sefer called Kisvei Kabbalah shel ha'Ramchal, this is towards the end of the sefer) explains that the cherubs on the ark correspond to the cherubs in Bereishis that guard the way to the Tree of Life together with the fiery revolving sword. Essentially he explains that the cherubs are the simple childlike meaning of life which is ...


2

It is known that the heathen in those days built temples to stars, and set up in those temples the image which they agreed upon to worship; because it was in some relation to a certain star or to a portion of one of the spheres. We were, therefore, commanded to build a temple to the name of God, and to place therein the ark with two tables of stone, on which ...


2

Yes it is possible following some rules. To make is allowed, and to buy when you are sure that the provenance has nothing to do with worship. But if the provenance is from idolatry, obviously it is prohibited (E.g. old statues which was for worship). Regarding artwork, see Shulchan Aruch Yore Dea 141, 4 for prohibited things. Forms of animals are allowed, ...


2

Judaism fundamentaly differs from Egyptian theological system. Only thing similar here are wings and fact there is two of them. Cherubim and their representation is not contrary to commandments, it was explicitly commanded by God, I think that is why they might appear elsewhere… It is in Shemot 25:18 "and you shall make two golden cherubim; you shall make ...


2

Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan was among many things a painter. He mentioned this in his book Jewish Meditation. At the thirtieth anniversary of his passing, his son started a Facebook page in order to raise money and the like to fund a Sefer Torah in his memory. On that Facebook page he also posted different pictures and paintings from his father. Here is the post ...


2

This isn't much. Basically showing what the book is about. But is well worth the purchase. The Messianic Temple by Chaim Clorfene.


1

The Cherubim aren't a model of any particular heavenly entity. It is a depiction of peace and love. Although it is true that we probably wouldn't have been allowed to create something like this has we not been commanded to do so, since the line is very narrow, it is not entirely the same as what was prohibited. What is outlawed is images of objects from ...


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