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10

The Medrash records a machloket Tannaim about whether in the future all the moadim are batel except for Yom Kippur and Purim or all the moadim except for Purim. The Maharal writes in his hakdama to Ohr Chadash, his commentary on Megillat Esther, that on both days the Jewish people were/are opposed by a force that seeks their complete destruction - Yom Kippur ...


8

Indeed, this is the same person. The entry for "David ben Solomon ibn Zimra (Radbaz)" in The Responsa Literature states: He conducted a large yeshiba and many famous scholars were his pupils. The great talmudic author, Bezalel Ashkenazi, was one of them; and Isaac Luria, the world-famous kabbalist, was another. As for your impression about devoting his ...


7

The MaVar YaBok brings that The Arizal was particular not use anything from the Achronim (not in our sense of the word rather later authorities ,not sure the starting point),rather only use prayers from the Rishonim who understand formulation of prayer and would not make errors. He actually singles out Yigdal specifically (assuming the reason is because of ...


7

Hokhmah Elohit is the term coined by translators like the ibn Tibbon's to translate the Arabic "al-'ilm al-ilaahiy", which, in turn, was coined by Arab translators from the Greek to translate Aristotle's term for metaphysics/theology. An 'elohi' is therefore a practitioner of metaphysics or theology. See Philosophical Terms in the Moreh Nebukim by Israel ...


7

I'm not claiming to give a full answer; I did learn about this topic, but I don't remember the specific example. However, there is one answer which works in general. In Judaism, the concept of gilgulim/reincarnation is that a person can come back into this world in order to fix up, or accomplish something, which wasn't done properly in a previous life. If ...


6

Pri Etz Chaim - Shaar Hanhaga Halimud And my teacher (the Arizal), of blessed memory, from his tremendous quickness and depth, would study a halacha (talmud) in 6 ways in the manner of pshat (simple meaning) corresponding to the 6 days of the week and afterward he would say the halacha in the manner of Sod (secret meaning) corresponding to Shabbat... I ...


6

I think the commentary Beit Lehem Yehuda by Rabbi Yehudah Fetayah fits that description. The author says in the introduction that he wants to provide something like what Rashi provides for people learning Talmud. The commentary aims to be an aid to understanding the words of the text as directly as possible.


6

From the Encyclopedia.com entry on Joseph Della Reina: JOSEPH DELLA REINA , hero of a kabbalistic legend who attempted to bring an end to Satan's power and thus lead to the redemption. The earliest version of the story, which evolved between the 15th and 17th centuries, is recorded by *Abraham b. Eliezer ha-Levi in his treatise Iggeret Sod ha-Ge'...


6

Let's do one better: where is G-d's name concealed in all of Tanach? I'm looking for שם הוי"ה backwards and forwards, equally spaced from the beginning and end of four consecutive words (first letter, second letter, last letter, second to last letter, etc.), similar to most of the answers and comments posted so far. I'm not going to pretend to understand ...


5

You could start with the Rambam's סדר תפילות כל השנה found at the end of משנה תורה - ספר אהבה. The Rambam predates the Arizal by over 300 years.


5

Jewish Chronicle states Apparently, the earliest source for the custom of welcoming the Ushpizin on Succot is in the Zohar, the classic of Kabbalah. The Zohar makes clear that a central reason is to stress the importance of inviting guests to share the holiday with us: "One must also gladden the poor, and the portion [that would otherwise have ...


5

See here as a translation from the Arizal: Cain and Abel also damaged [reality]. [Not only Cain but also] Abel "gazed and damaged". According to the Sages, when Abel offered his sacrifice to G-d, he gazed upon the Divine Presence and therefore became incurred the death penalty (which is why it was divine providence that Cain killed him). Gazing ...


4

Yes, at the end of chapter 67 in Sefer HaGilgulim it brings exactly what was cited in your question from Rabbi Ariel Bar Tzadok. The Ari z"l, as quoted in a hand-written note from Rabbi Chaim Vital shown here below, is actually making several source references. The Mitzri mentioned in the heading is referring to the unnamed Mitzri also mentioned in ...


4

The Beis Yosef has a responsum (Avkat Rochel # 136) addressed to the Arizal, wherein the Arizal is referred to as המקובל האלהי “the godly kabbalist” (or perhaps האלהי means “theologian”). The Chida cites this responsum from manuscript in his entry for the Arizal in Shem Hagedolim, and has a slightly different wording. There the Arizal is referred to as החכם ...


4

It was composed by the students of the Ari z"l outlining how the Ari performed the mitzvot. Here is a link that you can look at: Shulchan Aruch HaAri z'l.


4

See Jewish Virtual Library. It's Shlomo.


4

The Geni genalogical website identifies her as Lipke Frances. See her other biographical records on MyHeritage. The last name matches the one of Mordecai Frances which this biography of the Ari identifies as "the rich brother of his mother who took care of his upbringing and education." (similarly here).


4

Chapter 5, verse 4. In the initials of the 4 words יבא המלך והמן היום


4

According to the Pri Etz Chaim of Rav Chaim Vital, the instances of G-d's name encoded in Megillat Esther are: "היא "וכל" הנשים "יתנו, ר"ת הוה"י. לבדו עותה המלכה ושתי, ס"ת והה"י. ושתי המלכה לפניו ולא באה, ס"ת יהו"ה. "ומלכותה "יתן "המלך לרעותה "הטובה, ר"ת ויה"ה. "יום "ובמלאות "הימים "האלה, ר"ת יוה"ה. יהודי היה בשושן הבירה ושמו, ס"ת יהה"ו. כי כלתה אליו הרעה,...


4

If you trust the linked article for the very claim that he was secluded on an island, you may as well trust what it says immediately thereafter: During this period, he concentrated his studies on the Zohar and the works of earlier Kabbalists. He was also particularly interested in his contemporary, Kabbalist Moses Cordovero. It was at this time that Luria ...


4

I don't know what the Likkutei Shas of the Arizal says, but as per the second clause of your question asking if there are any other reasons for a connection, there is a famous piece in the fifth chapter of Sefer Yetzira which goes through the alef beis. It writes somewhat cryptically: המליך אות ס' בשינה וקשר לו כתר וצרפן זה בזה וצר בהם קשת בעולם וכסלו בשנה ...


3

Sefer Masos Kapay quotes the Siddur Hageonim Vihamekubalim that the Arizal insisted on only saying piyutim authored by Rishonim because those could be trusted to be al derech haemes, but the later generations didn't understand kabbalah sufficiently to author well-written piyuttim. Another possibility is that he didn't consider the author worthy of composing ...


3

As others, I don't know what the Arizal is referring to. But Kli Yakar says that Kain was the first who made the sacrifice. Hevel envied him and made a sacrifice too. As a hint to this, he brings a posuk from Kohelet 4:4 וראיתי אני את כל עמל ואת כל כשרון המעשה כי היא קנאת איש מרעהו גם זה הבל ורעות רוח


3

I don't know about God's name being "concealed", but Mordechai tells Esther confidently that if she does not do her part, "release and liberation will materialize for the Jews from some other source". What could that other source be except one engineered by Hashem? כִּ֣י אִם־הַחֲרֵ֣שׁ תַּחֲרִישִׁי֮ בָּעֵ֣ת הַזֹּאת֒ רֶ֣וַח וְהַצָּלָ֞ה ...


3

I think you’re looking for Sha’ar HaGilgulim of Rav Chaim Vital. See Wikipedia here.


2

We find in Sanhedrin 104b how the Chachamim were about to count someone in to the list of those not set to have a part in Olam Habbah. Then his father's figure appeared and begged for his sake, but was ignored. A fire sprung up on the edges of their benches and they ignored it. They likewise ignored heavenly voices calling out his merits. However, what ...


2

I am going to answer this question for kabbalah in general sense it answers most of what you ask about the Arizal as well. Typically there are two ways to deal with kabbalistic teachings: to accept them as divinely inspired or as definitely complimenting what is written in Torah shebichtav (Written Torah; Pentateuch) and to deny them as being fallible ...


2

You can purchase an English version of the sefer here. It also includes some explanation of difficult passages and a clear introduction introducing the basics of kabbalah. I am not certain if it contains everything that is in the original Sefer Etz Chayim by Chayim Vital, but it is a good start nonetheless. I have read the book, but I have never read the ...


2

I think this is in regard to the teaching of the Ari, specifically, not Kabbalah in general. The Ari did not himself write down most of his teachings. Several of his disciples did so after his death. One of them was Rabbi Hayyim Vital, whose written versions of the teachings make up what are now generally known as Kitvey Ha-Ari. In the second preface of ...


2

As @Harel13 commented: In the Book, Pri Eitz Chaim, here, (the Teachings of Isaac Luria / Arizal, recorded by his student Chayim Vital), it says the following: "It's found in another place: It's spelled / it says עשי״ו [Esav], because he was reincarnated into ישוע [Yeshua]. [I think he's trying to point out the the letters in both names are the same, ...


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