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Mishna Bekhorot 1:7 מצות פדייה קודמת למצות עריפה, שנאמר "אם לא תפדה וערפתו"‏ The Mitzva of redeeming precedes the Mitzva of [killing], as it says "And if you don't redeem is, [kill] it". So the owner could choose to kill it, but that's not what he's supposed to do. This is actually just like Yibbum, as the Mishna continues to explain, at least in ...


7

Rambam Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Ma'aseh HaKorbanot 1:1: כָּל הַקָּרְבָּנוֹת שֶׁל מִינֵי נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה בָּאִין מֵחֲמִשָּׁה מִינִין בִּלְבַד. מִן הַבָּקָר וּמִן הַכְּבָשִׂים וּמִן הָעִזִּים וּמִן הַתּוֹרִים וּמִן בְּנֵי הַיּוֹנָה:‏ All sacrifices of living creatures come from the following five species only: Cattle, sheep, goats, turtle doves and ...


7

The Rambam (Hil. Bikkurim 12:1) writes: מצות עשה לפדות כל אדם מישראל פטר חמור בשה ואם לא רצה לפדותו מצות עשה לעורפו שנאמר ופטר חמור תפדה בשה ואם לא תפדה וערפתו ושתי מצות אלו נוהגות בכל מקום ובכל זמן ומצות פדייה קודמת למצות עריפה: It is a positive commandment for every Jewish man to redeem the first [male] issue of a donkey with a seh. If he ...


7

Deuteronomy 33:22: וּלְדָ֣ן אָמַ֔ר דָּ֖ן גּ֣וּר אַרְיֵ֑ה יְזַנֵּ֖ק מִן־הַבָּשָֽׁן׃ And of Dan he said: Dan is a lion’s whelp That leaps forth from Bashan. Rabbeinu Bachya writes in his commentary to that pasuk: דן גור אריה. ע"ד הפשט, המשילו בגבורה לגור אריה כאשר הוא מדלג מהר בשן . דן גור אריה, וע"ד הקבלה נקרא דן כנגד מדת הדין, כי כן אמרה ...


6

Rav Yaakov Emden -Shilas Yaavetz 1:17 writes that a pet needs to be fed first and fish are included. It is important to note that if the animal has a feeding schedule and your pet wouldn't be hungry you would be allowed to it first, see teshuva inside. Text:


6

Castration of an animal is forbidden to Gentiles (according to most opinions) so a Jew cannot tell him to do so. If he does he is forbidden to eat that animal. But if the gentile has already castrated the animal it is permitted for a Jew to eat that animal. The Shulchan Aruch (Rabbinic Authority) Even Haezer 5,14 says: אסור לומר לכותי לסרס בהמה שלנו. ואם ...


6

Maybe you heard of a story reported in "Legends of Old Testament Characters, from the Talmud and other sources" by a Rev. S. Baring-Gould, chapter 14 There left the ark two sorts of animals which had not entered it the pig and the cat. These animals did not exist before the Deluge, and God created them in the ark because it was full of filth and human ...


5

Bardelas In a 2016 blogpost titled "Day of the Bardelas," R' Natan Slifkin writes about the bardelas in depth and proposes 3 options: (abridged- see blogpost for full version) Cheetah In Greek, it refers primarily to the leopard but also to the “lesser leopard” i.e. the cheetah. Hyena According to the Babylonian Talmud the bardelas is to be identified ...


4

Ibn Ezra (commentary to 11:4) writes that the reason for the Torah mentioning it is that they have one sign. Bechor Shor (commentary to 11:4) takes this a step further and says that the Torah is saying that they are forbidden even though they have one sign. Chizkuni (commentary to 11:4) takes this another step further and says that even the non-Jews consider ...


4

As explained by Maimonides in Guide for the Perplexed 3:48, the Torah does recognize animals' physical and emotional feelings, and several commandments reflect this: The commandment concerning the killing of animals is necessary, because the natural food of man consists of vegetables and of the flesh of animals: the best meat is that of animals permitted ...


4

The Yalqut Reubeni (here, s.v. מה) addresses this question and quotes from a collection ‘Sode Raza’ (attributed to student(s) of R. Yehudah HaChasid) that the layer of dew would bring forth vegetables for the animals.


4

According to Rav Yehoshua Y. Neuwirth z"l, in his work Shemirath Shabbath [Ke'hilchata] (27:29): a. A fish which has died may be removed from an aquarium, so that the other fish should not die, if a considerable financial loss is involved. b. Taking out the dead fish is not a breach of the prohibition against selection, since the dead fish ...


4

Mechilta d'Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, 12:38 ומקנה רב היה לבני (גד) [ראובן] ולבני (ראובן) [גד] יכול לבני ראובן ולבני גד היה לשאר שבטים לא היה? אלא מלמד שאלו פשטו ידיהם בו How could it be that Reuven and Gad ended up with so much more cattle than the others? This teaches us that these two tribes stuck out their hands and [were quick] to grab [the spoils] ...


3

Tosafot Shabbat 55a suggest that the rule forbidding working one’s animals on shabbat would apply to fish as well. They think that this could be derived from a gezeira shavah linking shabbat to the prohibition of cross-breeding (which the gemara in Bava Kamma 55a definitively rules applies to fish). Then, say Tosafot, we can learn from shabbat to other ...


3

Dr. Slifkin writes (The Torah Encyclopedia of The Animal Kingdom p. 234) writes: Taken at face value, these descriptions do not concur with our knowledge of what actually happens; deer are observed to give birth without any assistance from snakes. Some suggest that the Talmud is recording the zoological beliefs of the era. Others argue that the Talmud is ...


3

It seems that if the only profitable way of raising the animals/chickens is by making smaller enclosures for them, while we should encourage the animal owners to try and treat the animals the best they can, they are not transgressing Tzaar Baalei Chaim as the animals were meant to serve humans (i.e we don't want humans in poorer countries to lack poultry due ...


3

The Noda B'Yehuda wrote a lengthy teshuva (Yoreh Deah, Teshuvah 10) addressing hunting. 1) Perhaps hunting is a violation of "צער בּעלי חיים" (causing suffering to creatures) or "בּעל תשׁחית" (unnecessary destruction)? A: This would not be considered "causing suffering to creatures." since that prohibition only refers to causing suffering to an animal while ...


3

R. Yitzchak Abadi has a responsum (Ohr Yitzchak 2:51) about allowing seeing-eye dogs inside the synagogue. He cites R. Moshe Feinstein's responsum on the matter (mentioned in Gershon Gold's answer) and rejects R. Feinstein's Talmudic interpretations that justified his permissive ruling. As for the issue that a blind person will never be able to attend the ...


3

Moshe Rabbeinu, while he was grazing Yisro's flock, came to the area of Mt. Sinai, which shows that there was plenty of grazing fields out there in the wilderness (source pasted below). The word "midbar" does not necessarily mean dry like the Sahara, it just means an area that is not settled, a "wilderness," but it could still have lots of grassy hills and ...


3

A dead Kosher animal would normally transmit Tumas Neveila, and a dead non Kosher animal would transmit Tumas Beheima Temeia (Rambam Hilchos Shaar Avos Hatuma 1,1-3) The Rambam Hilchos Shaar Avos Hatuma 1,13 says that when the animal is dried up to the point that it cannot turn get its moisture back by soaking in warm water, the animal no longer transmits ...


3

Rav Slifkin, though not cited here as such, says it is most likely to be the aurochs. It is treated fully in the aforelinked encyclopedia (volume 1), but he also addressed it incidentally in this essay. From all the references in Scripture, we know the following about the re’em: It is similar to domestic cattle, but it is a powerful, dangerous animal, ...


3

The reem (plural: r'aimim) has been described differently in various sources. Bottom line, it is most likely an aurochs. Wikipedia has a good short summary A re'em, [has been] variously translated as a unicorn or a wild ox. It was first identified in modern times with the aurochs by Johann Ulrich Duerst [...] This has been generally accepted, as it ...


3

I attended a pidyon petter chamor in Pittsburgh in 2017. It was organized by the Kollel and attended by many of the local Orthodox rabbis (and lots of other people). Unfortunately the web site they set up at the time is no longer there (and not in the Wayback Machine), but I have a video (linked on my blog post about the event). In the (first, ...


2

Rosh HaShanah 8a gives reasons for the opinions of both Tanna Kamma and R.El'azar/R. Shim'on. Rava's interpretation (which the gemara seems to accept as final) is as follows: Everyone believes that sheep conceive in Adar, and lamb in Av (five months later). Everyone compares tithing animals to tithing crops. Tanna Kamma holds that just as the new year for ...


2

The L'Horos Nassan 11:11:6 actually addresses this question . He answers with regards to an animal created from sefer yetzira that from the Rambam Nizekei Mamon 10:2 that animals that kill get stoned. Rav Gestetner explains that maybe thos applies to regular animals that are born normally ,but not to abnormal creations. However, he notes that although one ...


2

I would say that בהמה comes to exclude a חיה (see Difference between behema and chaya) and then the Torah explains that what types of בהמה are acceptable: מן הצאן - which means the ovicaprid family מן הבקר - which means the bovine family. This serves to exclude other possible kosher animals which might be considered a בהמה (like a buffalo according to ...


2

If you’re looking for practical ramifications of the resemblance between humans and apes, then consider R. Yose’s opinion in Kilayim 8:5: וְאַדְנֵי הַשָּׂדֶה, חַיָּה. רַבִּי יוֹסֵי אוֹמֵר, מְטַמְּאוֹת בָּאֹהֶל כָּאָדָם.‏ The adnei hasadeh is a wild animal. R. Yose says, it[s carcass] imparts impurity in a tent, like a human. What is this adnei ...


2

No. Tumas meis is only for human corpses, and the accepted halacha is it doesn't even apply to human ashes.


2

It is first worth noting that Rabbi Yehonatan of Lunel does not say what is quoted in the question. There is nothing about wings and belching smoke and fire. The English translation of Rabbi Steinsaltz's original lecture in Hebrew either mistranslated, embellished or Rabbi Steinsaltz misquoted Rabbi Yehonatan. Rabbi Yehonatan's commentary is from a single ...


2

There is no issue of ever min hachai with fish or grasshoppers. The gemara in Chulin 101b writes The prohibition of eating a limb from a living animal applies whether the limb comes from a domesticated animal (beheima), an undomesticated animal (chaya), or a bird, and whether it is from a non-kosher species or from a kosher species See also Rambam ...


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