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10

I don't know about whether such a practice technique is permissible, but I'd recommend against it for other reasons. Unfortunately, due to Torah-readers' habit of singing "Amen" as an introduction to their reading, they sometimes end up delaying this response until too long after the blessing it's responding to. (The response is supposed to be "immediate" ...


10

First of all, I have to correct a common misconception in your question: that one must say Amen in order to fulfill one's obligation in the blessing. This is only true if the one saying the blessing is not fulfilling his obligation then as well. In the vast majority of cases where the one saying the blessing is fulfilling his obligation with you, you can ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

Yes, the Chazzan must say that line out loud. In fact, as part of his job as Chazzan, he should really recite all the blessings surrounding the recitation of Shema, in the morning and the evening, aloud in order to fulfill anyone's obligation. However, R Yosef Eliyahu Henkin writes that at the very least he must recite the closing of each blessing, a small ...


6

The biography preceding Igros Moshe volume 8 describes how an elderly Rabbi Moshe Feinstein heard wishes for a long life -- IIRC he was at a bris and they said "may you see his wedding!" He tearfully acknowledged it wouldn't happen, but answered amen nonetheless. Sforno says that Sarah assumed the mystery men's discussion of her birth was a human blessing (...


6

The Shulchan Aruch 59:4 says not to answer amen after Ahava Rabbah/Olam. The Rema to 61:3 says that the custom is people finish Ahava Rabbah before the Shatz, so they can answer Amen. The Mishnah Berurah 59:4 § 25 (linked above) explains that Ahava Rabbah isn't a regular birkas hamitzvah, where you shouldn't speak before doing the mitzvah. It sounds like ...


5

Luach Davar B'Ito 5771 page 283 says that you do not say Amein after V'leslichas Avon, you say Amein after V'lchaporas Pesha.


5

R. Shraga Feivish Schneebalg has a responsum about this precise question, in Shu"t Shraga Hameir 8:23. He begins by noting that he had this question for many years, but because it was not relevant to him (as he was a man) and no one had ever asked him for a ruling he never recorded his view. Now, since someone asked him, he wrote a responsum about it. At ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim 8:102:2 writes that watching the syium hashas (live)on tv and hears kaddish ,one can answer amen yehei shmei rabbah... Since it is not the shem Hashem,he also talks about hearing thunder over the phone and holds one may say bracha without Shem UMalchus. רבבות אורח חיים אפריפ


4

It is a long beracha, called the Birchat Me'ein Sheva. It starts with Baruch and ends with Baruch. The Mechaber Orach Chaim 268:8 writes that one praying alone should not say the blessing. The Ramah adds that one who wants to may do so, by skipping the beginning and conclusion of the blessing. The Be'er Heitev explains that this means the one praying ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch says that one should not answer to kaddish or kedusha in the middle of amidah. He says that one should stop praying, listen and lechaven and that will be as though one answered. In Pninei Halacha Rabbi Eliezer Melamed brings sources that some say that doing so would constitute a hefsek. His conclusion is that one should wait and listen, ...


3

This halacha is mentioned in Kol Bo (§24). The Kol Bo mentions two possible reasons1 for why someone should not answer amein with food in his mouth: Just as a person should not recite a b'racha with food in his mouth,2 he should not answer amein to a b'racha if food is in his mouth. It is dangerous to talk with food in one's mouth. The Kol Bo prefers the ...


3

From the Ben Ish Chai (end of Parshas Vayachi): אות טז: … עוד נשאלתי שם בעשרה שלמדו תהלים ורוצים כלם לומר קדיש שאין שום אחד עונה והבאתי דברי הרב בני יאודה עייאש ז״ל סי׳ ג׳ והארכתי קצת בזה והעלתי דלכתחילה יזהרו להיות אחד עונה להם הקדיש׃ He cites the Bnei Yehuda Siman 3 who writes about this and says that in a case when all are saying kaddish ...


3

One should say blessings aloud (source coming soon, b'li neder, but I think it's Sefer HaBeracha WeHilchotea). However if one knows that the people around him won't answer amen he should say it quietly (Ben Ish Hai).


3

Disclaimer: this answer does not deal with the latest time for mincha. It assumes that the question refers to a time when one for sure cannot pray mincha. If it's really not the time for mincha at all then don't say Amen as the blessings are levatala. I can't prove this for late mincha specifically, but by a late shacharit, the Biur Halacha (OC 89 sv ...


3

In case this satisfies you, the Magid Meisharim discusses this in his own way. The Beis Yosef quotes the Shiblei Haleket that since the ten prasises in Kaddish correspond to the ten commandments we separate the first two from the rest just as at mount Sinai the first two were separate, since we heard them straight from God: ומפני מה הפסיקו בין "יתגדל ...


3

Explicit Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:4 - סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה ואם יצאו מקצתן ודין השליח צבור צְרִיכִין שֶׁיִּהְיוּ כָּל הָעֲשָׂרָה בְּמָקוֹם אֶחָד, וְהַשְּׁלִיחַ צִבּוּר עִמָּהֶם, אֲבָל אִם מִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר זֶה וּמִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר אַחֵר, אֵינָם מִצְטָרְפִין, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁהַפֶּתַח פָּתוּחַ בֵּינֵיהֶם, וַאֲפִלּוּ אִם הָרֹב הֵמָּה ...


3

Your question is not clear, but: If it's an actual prayer, then added in "sounds" are acceptable. It's not unusual for a Chazzan to add in la-lala-la or similar - so as to stretch the words to the tune. Answering Amein is correct. If it's a parody that simply sounds like a prayer then there's a problem answering Amein (called an orphaned Amein - one without ...


2

Yes. (Yalkut Yosef Helek 3, 215:4).


2

The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 215:4): כל המברך ברכה שאינה צריכה הרי זה נושא שם שמים לשוא, והרי הוא כנשבע לשוא ואסור לענות אחריו אמן.‏ Anyone who says an unnecessary blessing has taken God's name in vain and it is forbidden to recite Amen after him. So it would seem that you are correct in not saying Amen. As for the educational/parenting aspects, ...


2

I can't say for certain for kaddish, but for sure for brachos the mishnah berurah quotes a machlokes and writes that one should not say amein if unsure the bracha.


2

As an aside, the prompting of "ואמרו" is not found in all early manuscripts of the kaddish, some have "ונאמר". Dr. de Sola Pool, in his 'The Kaddish' (pg. 42), posits that the idea was to seal closing doxologies as we have elsewhere in the bible where a chapter is ended with the congregation joining in responding "amen" (see ibid. ft. 80). Prior to this ...


2

Short answer: They may want to rely on the brocha of the master of the house on Shabbos in order to be included in his lechem mishna, although this may not be necessary, Long Answer: There are two types of brochos: 1) Birkos Hamitzvos; recited (usually) before performing a mitzva 2) Birkos Hanehenin; recited before and after having pleasure from something (...


2

I spoke to my Rav about this and he said that one starts over (as stated in the Aruch Hashulchan) for Mincha, but for Shacharit there is Smichat geulah l'tefilah, that is to say that one should continue straight from barchu through the end of the Amidah without a break. Therefore for shacharit you should say all aloud with the chazzan and not say amens, ...


2

Where is the source for not answering אמן to a ברכה until it is totally finished It's called an אמן חטופה and the Rambam (Hil. Brachot 1:14) already codifies it. The source is from Brachot 47a. As the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (6:10) defines it: גַּם יִזָּהֵר מְאֹד שֶׁלֹּא יַעֲנֶה אָמֵן קֹדֶם שֶׁסִּיֵּם הַמְבָרֵךְ כָּל הַבְּרָכָה, כִּי זֶהוּ אָמֵן חֲטוּפָה ...


2

The earliest source you'll find is in Bemidbar 5:22 where the suspected Sota answers Amen-amen to the Cohen's conditional curses. וּבָאוּ הַמַּיִם הַמְאָרְרִים הָאֵלֶּה בְּמֵעַיִךְ לַצְבּוֹת בֶּטֶן וְלַנְפִּל יָרֵךְ וְאָמְרָה הָאִשָּׁה אָמֵן אָמֵן ‏ The Mishna in Sota 2:5 explains that she's answering Amen to multiple aspects of the curse: עַל מַה ...


2

אמן יתומה typically means waiting too long to respond to Amen after berachah has been given. I think your case is similar to אמן יתומה since it is an Amen which is not connected to any berachah. The focus of your Amen during a real aliyah is that you are sharing the beracha with the oleh. Originally, each oleh read his own aliyah, and so he said a beracha ...


2

In the respective inside back covers of the popular sidurim תפלת כל פה (where the chart is in Hebrew) and תהלת ה׳ (where it's in English and according to Chabad-Lubavitch practice). ArtScroll sidurim have the same info on the pages of "Baruch sheamar" and "Yishtabach", but not in chart form.


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