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11

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


10

I don't know about whether such a practice technique is permissible, but I'd recommend against it for other reasons. Unfortunately, due to Torah-readers' habit of singing "Amen" as an introduction to their reading, they sometimes end up delaying this response until too long after the blessing it's responding to. (The response is supposed to be "immediate" ...


9

First of all, I have to correct a common misconception in your question: that one must say Amen in order to fulfill one's obligation in the blessing. This is only true if the one saying the blessing is not fulfilling his obligation then as well. In the vast majority of cases where the one saying the blessing is fulfilling his obligation with you, you can ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

See Mateh Moshe (2:338), who brings from the Mordechai that one should say "ואמרו אמן" at the end of the Harachaman section as an exhortation (אזהרה) to the others there to answer "amen" as a form of necessary respect to the host, similar to the end of the "Magdil" section, where we do the same as a form of necessary respect toward Hashem (the object of our ...


7

It's not unique. It's because it's the last blessing in a series. The same is true for bone (b'rachamav) Y'rushalayim after a meal and the final b'racha of Halel and p'suke d'zimra. Specifically, SA OC 215:1 has that we say amen to our own b'racha in each of these cases even without hearing someone else simultaneously, and I believe S'faradim follow this ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 215:2) that one should not respond amen to a bracha recited by an adult Jew if שינה ממטבע הברכות he changed the way the bracha was coined. The Mishna Berura there notes that this is due to the fact that if he changed it too much that he would not fulfill his obligation, it is then a bracha levatala to which one is forbidden to ...


7

Yes, the Chazzan must say that line out loud. In fact, as part of his job as Chazzan, he should really recite all the blessings surrounding the recitation of Shema, in the morning and the evening, aloud in order to fulfill anyone's obligation. However, R Yosef Eliyahu Henkin writes that at the very least he must recite the closing of each blessing, a small ...


6

The biography preceding Igros Moshe volume 8 describes how an elderly Rabbi Moshe Feinstein heard wishes for a long life -- IIRC he was at a bris and they said "may you see his wedding!" He tearfully acknowledged it wouldn't happen, but answered amen nonetheless. Sforno says that Sarah assumed the mystery men's discussion of her birth was a human blessing (...


5

Shouldn't be necessary. Better to focus on Talmud Torah. Source EDIT: For those who can't listen to the shiur, you should know that Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach rules in Halichot Shelomo 9:6 that one does not even need to stop to answer kaddish or kedusha when learning by oneself, let alone when participating in a shiur!


5

Luach Davar B'Ito 5771 page 283 says that you do not say Amein after V'leslichas Avon, you say Amein after V'lchaporas Pesha.


5

R. Shraga Feivish Schneebalg has a responsum about this precise question, in Shu"t Shraga Hameir 8:23. He begins by noting that he had this question for many years, but because it was not relevant to him (as he was a man) and no one had ever asked him for a ruling he never recorded his view. Now, since someone asked him, he wrote a responsum about it. At ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim 8:102:2 writes that watching the syium hashas (live)on tv and hears kaddish ,one can answer amen yehei shmei rabbah... Since it is not the shem Hashem,he also talks about hearing thunder over the phone and holds one may say bracha without Shem UMalchus. רבבות אורח חיים אפריפ


4

No, but if it is live yes (Yalkut Yosef, Helek 3, 215:4). However, over the internet it would be Asur (Q&A 91813 to R' Musafi). The reason is because the internet is a little off. Forgot to mention: Even if you both are Mechawen you can't be Yose.


4

I once asked a Rov regarding the Halacha of what to do in 770. There is one official Shacharis/Mincha/Maariv minyan ("the main minyan") and there are also side minyanim taking place under the Woman's section throughout the day. Between the "side" minyanim and the "main" Beis Medrash are mechitzos to avoid this issue However, there are times when people (...


4

We see in many places that if one finishes a bracha before the shatz that he should say amen and that is recommended (SA OC 51:1,59:4. Saying amen prior to finishing the bracha is debated, but only due to the interruption. A possible reason for the distinction between the cases is that saying amen to my friends bracha is seconding my friend's bracha. ...


4

It is a long beracha, called the Birchat Me'ein Sheva. It starts with Baruch and ends with Baruch. The Mechaber Orach Chaim 268:8 writes that one praying alone should not say the blessing. The Ramah adds that one who wants to may do so, by skipping the beginning and conclusion of the blessing. The Be'er Heitev explains that this means the one praying ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch says that one should not answer to kaddish or kedusha in the middle of amidah. He says that one should stop praying, listen and lechaven and that will be as though one answered. In Pninei Halacha Rabbi Eliezer Melamed brings sources that some say that doing so would constitute a hefsek. His conclusion is that one should wait and listen, ...


3

One should say blessings aloud (source coming soon, b'li neder, but I think it's Sefer HaBeracha WeHilchotea). However if one knows that the people around him won't answer amen he should say it quietly (Ben Ish Hai).


3

Disclaimer: this answer does not deal with the latest time for mincha. It assumes that the question refers to a time when one for sure cannot pray mincha. If it's really not the time for mincha at all then don't say Amen as the blessings are levatala. I can't prove this for late mincha specifically, but by a late shacharit, the Biur Halacha (OC 89 sv ...


3

You would have to answer (see Ateret Paz 1:3: Hoshen Mishpat:14:1).


3

See OC 6 (4) and MB who records a custom that each congregant says the morning blessings and the others answer omain (without the intention to fulfill their obligation by saying omain). See MB s.k. 13, who mentions a supporting view and the view of the Pri Megodim that only the Chazzan should say these blessings aloud. MB says that each place should follow ...


3

From the Ben Ish Chai (end of Parshas Vayachi): אות טז: … עוד נשאלתי שם בעשרה שלמדו תהלים ורוצים כלם לומר קדיש שאין שום אחד עונה והבאתי דברי הרב בני יאודה עייאש ז״ל סי׳ ג׳ והארכתי קצת בזה והעלתי דלכתחילה יזהרו להיות אחד עונה להם הקדיש׃ He cites the Bnei Yehuda Siman 3 who writes about this and says that in a case when all are saying kaddish ...


3

In the Shulchan Aruch Harav it says two or three words (that have nothing to do with the meal) are not considered a Hefsek: ומכל מקום אין צריך ליזהר אלא מלדבר באיזה עסק וענין אחר אבל שיחה בעלמא ב' או ג' תיבות אינן חשובין הפסק לדברי הכל אפילו במים אחרונים (כיון שאין בהם ענין שלם) וכל שכן שמותר להשיב הן או לאו כששואלין אותו דבר.‏


3

This halacha is mentioned in Kol Bo (§24). The Kol Bo mentions two possible reasons1 for why someone should not answer amein with food in his mouth: Just as a person should not recite a b'racha with food in his mouth,2 he should not answer amein to a b'racha if food is in his mouth. It is dangerous to talk with food in one's mouth. The Kol Bo prefers the ...


3

In case this satisfies you, the Magid Meisharim discusses this in his own way. The Beis Yosef quotes the Shiblei Haleket that since the ten prasises in Kaddish correspond to the ten commandments we separate the first two from the rest just as at mount Sinai the first two were separate, since we heard them straight from God: ומפני מה הפסיקו בין "יתגדל ...


3

Explicit Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:4 - סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה ואם יצאו מקצתן ודין השליח צבור צְרִיכִין שֶׁיִּהְיוּ כָּל הָעֲשָׂרָה בְּמָקוֹם אֶחָד, וְהַשְּׁלִיחַ צִבּוּר עִמָּהֶם, אֲבָל אִם מִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר זֶה וּמִקְּצָתָם בְּחֶדֶר אַחֵר, אֵינָם מִצְטָרְפִין, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁהַפֶּתַח פָּתוּחַ בֵּינֵיהֶם, וַאֲפִלּוּ אִם הָרֹב הֵמָּה ...


3

Your question is not clear, but: If it's an actual prayer, then added in "sounds" are acceptable. It's not unusual for a Chazzan to add in la-lala-la or similar - so as to stretch the words to the tune. Answering Amein is correct. If it's a parody that simply sounds like a prayer then there's a problem answering Amein (called an orphaned Amein - one without ...


2

As to the first question, JEM sells Davening with the Rebbe which is a video of the Lubavitcher Rebbe being a Shliach Tzibbur. The Lubavitcher Rebbe must have known of its existence, and yet didn't protest against it. Therefore, there shouldn't be any halachic issues (in addition to the fact that JEM does have Rabbonim on their staff).


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