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14

Rashi to Shmuel Aleph 15:3 explains that the Amalekites were sorcerers and were capable of disguising themselves as animals - and for this reason Shaul was commanded to kill even the animals. In his commentary to Devarim 25:19 he brings another explanation: The eradication of the memory of Amaleik had to be absolute, and even if animals remained alive they ...


12

The Chidushei HaGriz (§ 161) comments that the narrative between Shmuel and Shaul is a basis for the Rambam's opinion in 6:4. In verse 18, Sh'mu'el says that Sha'ul was told to destroy אֶת-הַחַטָּאִים אֶת-עֲמָלֵק: And the LORD sent thee on a journey, and said: Go and utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites, and fight against them until they be consumed....


12

We can see how the commandment to eradicate Amalek does not contradict the possibility of converting to Judaism, from Rambam's description of the eradication process (Hilchot Melachim 6:1-4, Touger translation, my emphasis): אין עושין מלחמה עם אדם בעולם עד שקוראין לו שלום אחד מלחמת הרשות ואחד מלחמת מצוה שנאמר כי תקרב אל עיר להלחם עליה וקראת אליה לשלום אם ...


9

The impetus for the drasha in the medrash is specifically because the first nation the spies mentioned was amalek, and as the ikar sifsei chachamim explains why not mention the amori and chiti who live in the mountains first, must be they were trying to scare klal yisrael with the bad memory as the medrash continues with the mashal of the child who got hit ...


8

Yaavetz address this. He suggests that the tipcha on the word לא in לא תשכח hints to an allowance to mention the name in order to remember Torah. In accordance to the Gemara 'to bring the disgusting one into the study hall', in order to release the holy sparks that are contained within. He also points to the Gemara stating Haman's children taught Torah in ...


7

The Alter Rebbe (R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi) gives approximately this explanation in Torah Or (T'tzaveh, page פה). He breaks the name of the nation into component words "עם מלק" ("'am malak") meaning "severed nation" in that the nation's metaphysical brain and heart are severed at the neck. Thus, says the Alter Rebbe, even though that nation observed the ...


7

Sefer Moshav Zekeinim end Parshas Beshalach brings it in the name of a Medrash, however does not indicate where this Medrash is.


7

R' Rachmiel Zelcer in סימן יב of his נר למאה on פורים cites the צפנת פענח on מסכת סופרים: The name of Agag, king of Amalek, was in fact Hamdata. And "Agag" is actually the title for kings of Amalek. So why does the מגילה call Haman an Agagite (instead of Amalekite)? Since Sanherib mixed up all the nations, we can't be certain that any individual is in fact ...


6

Haman is called an Agagite to link him directly to the failure of Saul to kill Agag before he could reproduce. Mordechai and Saul were both of the tribe of Benjamin and it is literarily significant that one Benjaminite avenges the failure of another. That is why it is specified that he is an Agagite and not a mere Amalekite. I have also heard that Mordechai ...


6

The Amalekites' ability to change into animals is brought by Rashi on Shmuel 1:15:3 and the Rid on the same verse, and mentioned as a midrash in the Kitzur Ba'al Haturim commentary on Shemot 22:17. Their ability to use magic to flee from danger is brought in the longer commentary of Ba'al Haturim on Shemot 17:13 as something that "some [commentators] ...


6

According to the Seder Olam Rabbah (Chapter 5) - it was during the week which started on the 23rd of Iyyar. There are other Rabbinic sources which indicate that the battle was on a Friday. Since the Torah describes a battle of two days (Exodus 17:9) - that would make it Thursday and Friday 27th and 28th of Iyyar. 3. סדר עולם רבה (ליינר) פרק ה שנאמר ויסעו ...


6

What's the difference between Amalek and his nation? On “Amalek and his nation” Seforno says “who were collected from another people to fight”. I understand him to mean that the “nation” were his in the sense that he assembled them to fight with him but that they were not amalekites (may their name be erased). The Sefer שערי אהרון quotes the שכל טוב to ...


5

As seen in Rambam here, there is a peace process even when dealing with Amalek and the other seven nations. "A war is never waged against anyone before peace is offered. This applies both to an obligatory war and to a permitted war, as it is written “when you get near a city to wage war against it, you must offer peace” (Deut. 20:10). If they agree and ...


5

Rashi notes to verse 1 that he interprets this psalm as about Amalek in the future: And I say: "למנצח עלמות לבן", this song is about the future, when the youth and earliness of Israel will be brightened, their righteousness revealed, and their redemption brought, when Esav and his progeny are erased, as per our Torah. It is not uncommon to find, in ...


4

R Eliezer Melamed (Peninei Halakha here) answers as follows Three mitzvot in the Torah relate to Amalek. The first is a positive commandment to remember what Amalek did to us, as the Torah says: “Remember what Amalek did to you on your journey, as you left Egypt” (Devarim 25:17). The second is a negative commandment not to forget what ...


4

R. Avrohom Bornsztain has a responsum (Avnei Nezer O.C. #509) discussing women's obligation in this commandment. He wonders why the Sefer Hachinuch (cited in the question here) states that women are exempt because they are not war-wagers yet in Mitzvah # 425 (or 423) he states that women are obligated in the destruction of the seven nations. R. Bornsztain ...


3

Artscroll Sefer HaChinuch (vol. 7) to this mitzvah (note 8) quotes the Minchas Yitzchak who says that the Chinuch must have had a Midrash we don't. The footnote records "some editions" who leave the man unnamed, and simply refer to him as a wise man from Amalek. "Other editions" refer to Haman's descendants who learned Torah in Bnei Brak (Gittin 57b). The ...


3

A simple answer would be that the effort to support Moshe's arms implies that his arms themselves were winning the war. If it was just an arbitrary medium through which Hashem would perform a miracle, the why go to all the hassle f holding up the arms-just switch media. Therefore, in this case in particular Chazal emphasize that the victory actually ...


3

Please see the sources cited in this essay http://arikahn.blogspot.co.il/2014/02/amalek-question-of-race-updated-2014.html "Rambam outlines a Jewish etiquette of war: Before the military option is exercised, the diplomatic option must be explored. The opposing side should be offered a non-violent resolution that would make co-existence possible, which ...


3

R' Samson Raphael Hirsch sees the "זכר" (translated in the question as "memory") that needs to be erased as not simply the memory of the historical fact of Amalek, but the glorification of their values. To explain this commandment to "erase" in Deuteronomy 25:19 R' Hirsch points us to his comment on Exodus 17:14, where God makes ...


2

Insofar as it was necessary for Amalek to be destroyed before the Temple was built (Sanhedrin 20a, Rashi ibid) it seems that this mitzvah was fulfilled. Shaul did not fail, 1 Samuel 15 is clear that he destroyed the people as was commanded but he disobeyed by sparing King Agag [only] who was subsequently executed by Shmuel haNavi. With regard to later ...


2

The Mishbtzos Zahav posits that Shaul may have made the mistake that non Jews follow lineage maternially(see Kidushin 67b). If one looks closely at the passuk ,Shmuel says to Agag that he is going to make his mother childless just like he did. From this one can learn that Agag' s mother was still alive since she was not from Amalek. However, Shaul mistake ...


2

There are 2 souls, a Nefesh Elokis and Nefesh Habahamis, a G-dly soul and an animalistic soul. Goyim only have the animalistic soul. All physical desires and worldly pleasures come from the Nefesh Habahamis. The Nefesh Elokis just wants the pleasure of G-d, learning Torah and doing Mitzvos. We are able to use the animalistic soul for the service of G-d, but ...


2

Kesef Mishnah Understands1 the RABaD to argue with Maimonides and say that even if the Seven Nations or Amalek treat, we must kill them. He clarifies in the next dissention that we did offer peace to the Seven Nations before the conquest began, but that option was off the table after crossing the Jordan, (One must at least concede that, due to the explicit ...


2

The Medrash Rabba at the end of Parshas Shemois (literally the last sentence) says on Perek 6 Possuk 1 that you Moshe will see the Milchamois of Paroh and is Medayek that you wont see he Milchamois of the 31 Kings of Canaan and then sums up "Mikaan" that Moshe would not enter into Eretz Yisroel 3 Sedras earlier to what it says in Parshas Beshalach You have ...


2

Prof. Yehudah Elitzur wrote an essay on the subject. In his view, the Amalekite wasn't the son of a convert or even a ger toshav, but an actual 100% Amalekite. What was he doing there? He was a spy. The Amalekites would send off Amalekite youths to collect information in preparation for the many raids the Amalekites did (consider how they first met Yisrael - ...


2

Politically, Mordechai's letters had to echo Haman's letters as closely as possible. Otherwise, Haman's letters would have seemed stronger, and the bureaucracy would have supported the enemies of the Jews rather than the Jews. He had to write those words whether or not they would actually be carried out. (I've seen several people make this point. The ...


2

An Amalekite facilitated the assisted suicide of King Saul according to 2 Sam 1:4-10. According to tradition, that Amalekite was Edab, who was conceived just prior to the execution of his father, King Agag. As Bible students will recall, the prophet Samuel executed King Agag according to 1 Sam 15:7-9. In other words, King Saul had correctly remembered "...


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