3

No there are no explicit sources. In fact Rav Saadia Gaon in Emunos V'Deos explicitly rejects this concept and considers it a non Jewish concept. The Rashash in the back of the gemara in Bava Metziah 107 brings an indication from that gemara against concept of gilgulim. (This does not mean other do not hold of the concept, in fact many Rishonim ,and even ...


2

The Gemara in Eiruvin 19a brings from Rav Yirmiyahu Ben Elazar who explains that there are 3 different entrances to gehenom. One entrance is located in the desert which swallowed up Korach and his family. The second location is in the sea,and the 3rd location is in Jerusalem. The gemara then asks is there really only 3 openings? Dont we say that gehenom is ...


1

The story of the witch of En-dor in I Samuel 28 is obscure and seems rather strange. The Torah prohibits communication with the dead and yet Saul does just that. “So Saul disguised himself, dressed in other clothes, and he and two men went and came to the woman at night.” It is well known that mediums prefer to work at night since the darkness hides ...


1

I don't know of a letter, but Reb Elchonon Wasserman is quoted Here as telling his son to make a Bracha before they were killed by the nazis based on the Chofetz Chaim. Also, the Chofetz Chaim's grandson quoted him, as telling those killed because they were Jews in world war 1, to make a bracha before being killed even though it was not voluntary. Rav Moshe ...


1

The Torah (well, Nach, really) does call it She’ol, but it also calls it a number of other names. You can ask on Nach itself: why does it use multiple names and not stay consistent? It’s because, as described in Eruvin 19a, each name has some significance regarding Gehennom’s function.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible