11

Deut. 7:11 states: "You shall observe the commandment, and the decrees, and the ordinances, that I command you, today, to perform them." The Torah writes about Earthly rewards, and not a lot about the world to come (afterlife) or the resurrection (see further in Deut. Ch.7:12-etc.) One reason for this is the word "today" in Deut.7:11. The Torah is meant ...


10

The answer is there are few if any Biblical references. The afterlife is more emphasized in the oral tradition than in the actual Bible. Which is why you had the Sadduccees (the priestly Jews who only believed in the first five books of the Bible with no oral tradition) who did not believe in an afterlife at all. To this day there are still many Jews who are ...


9

Although I can not preclude any other opinions on the topic Rav Saadai Gaon writes: Likewise, apropos of the subject of marriage, I will say that our minds are capable only of grasping present state. As for what is forbidden or permitted in a situation that has no parallel at all in our earthly existence, such as whether or not marriage bonds will be ...


8

The Rambam apparently believes that the tinoq shenishba is defined by the attitude he/she was raised with toward Torah, not only their ignorance of it. And so even after learning Torah, as long as his motivation was at least founded on the initial bias against believing its truth or applicability, the tinoq shenishba is not held to account. To quote the ...


7

Orthodox Judaism believes in Heaven (Gan Eden or Olam HaBa) and Purgatory (Gehenna or Gehinom). Hell isn't the right word, because Gehenna (Purgatory) isn't permanent. Kaddish is only said for less than a year for the dead because we presume they won't be in gehenna that long. However, according to some views there are a few extremely evil individuals whose ...


7

depends whether you truly investigated the truth on this topic or whether you were just interested in writing papers. if the latter, tremendous burning regret. if the former, God will help you find it. And if He doesn't for whatever reason, though this is unlikely, then it's not your fault. Here are some relevant quotes on this from a major Jewish ...


7

The Rambam writes (Teshuva 8:1): וכל מי שאינו זוכה לחיים אלו הוא המת שאינו חי לעולם אלא נכרת ברשעו ואבד כבהמה. ... כלומר שאותה הנפש שפירשה מן הגוף בעולם הזה אינה זוכה לחיי העולם הבא אלא גם מן העולם הבא נכרתת Whoever does not merit to this life he is the dead that does not live forever, rather is cut off in his wickedness and lost like an animal ... ...


6

Some passages that are understood by some to refer to personal resurrection include: Isaiah 26:19: Oh, let Your dead revive! Let corpses arise! Awake and shout for joy, You who dwell in the dust!— For Your dew is like the dew on fresh growth; You make the land of the shades come to life. Job 19:25-27: But I know that my Vindicator lives;...


5

Numerous works reference a master of Gehinnom. For example the Talmud (Sanhedrin 52a) states: מאי דכתיב בחנפי לעגי מעוג חרק עלי שנימו, בשביל חנופה שהחניפו לקרח על עסקי לגימה - חרק עליהן שר של גיהנם שניו What is the meaning of the verse, with hypocritical mockers in feasts, they gnashed upon me with their teeth? Because they hypocritically [i.e., ...


5

The Ramchal writes in a letter that in his time (already 300 years ago) there is no longer "one" soulmate for everyone - in earlier generations, complete souls came to the world, and each soul had it's other half. However, today our souls are actually just fractions of greater souls, and not necessarily is there a corresponding "piece" to your fraction of a ...


4

BSD Did some research and found this. (Seen here http://www.myjewishlearning.com/beliefs/Theology/Afterlife_and_Messiah/Life_After_Death/Animals.shtml) Rabbi Saadiah Gaon in Book of Doctrines and Beliefs talks about this. Rav Saadiah Gaon deals with the fundamental question of why the Torah commands us to sacrifice innocent animals as an act of worship. ...


4

In the Cave of Machpelah, Abraham lies in Sarah's arms while she gazes at his head, (B. Bath 58a). The Mhrs"a in his aggadic explanations writes that righteous' deaths are likened to sleep, so Sarah was looking at his head while he slept, (perhaps inspecting it?), as is Derekh Eretz for a one to do for a sleeping person. He cites the wife of Rabbi Elazar ...


3

The Ramchal believes that everyone has a tikkun, classical commentaries stick to your observation that the souls of the wicked are totally destroyed. Rabbi Dessler's take on this seems to be that the more you buy into the olam ha'dimyon the more of a dimyon you become to the extent that you may not be able to survive le'asid lavo. More to the point peshat ...


3

In the beginning of cheilek we are told a Jew who believes in techiyas hameisim but does not believe that it is hinted to in the Torah, does not rise from the dead when it happens. Rashi explains who needs him and his beleifs. Meaning, as far as just payback from Hashem goes, you get what you give. The Rambam explains that a good nonbeliever jew gets his ...


3

Judaism has an afterlife of sorts, other than Heaven, in Gehinnon, as described in more detail in this answer.1 Gehinnon is not like the Christian Hell, however. While some get no afterlife at all (see note below), for most, Gehinnon is a temporary residence, while the departed is under divine judgement. The departed stays there for no more than one year ...


3

(To clarify Ezra a bit) The Jewish Messiah does not change anything on a personal level! One who sinned would be still accountable to G-d, and stand before the Heavenly Court and bear the consequences. The Messiah acts on the public level, symbolizing a start of a new era where G-d's presence and supervision are apparent to all.


3

The punctuation of words makes sense. To understand the answer, one need to know the rules of definite article in hebrew. In hebrew it is a letter "hey" adjointed at the begining of a word. In hebrew, there is an other case in which a letter "hey" is adjointed at the begining of a word, a hey that express a question, or demonstrate astonishment. It's ...


3

See Wikipedia - Jewish eschatology Until the late modern era, the standard Jewish belief was that after one dies, one's immortal soul joins God in the world to come while one's body decomposes. At the end of days, God will recompose one's body, place within it one's immortal soul, and that person will stand before God in judgement. The idea of a ...


3

No there are no explicit sources. In fact Rav Saadia Gaon in Emunos V'Deos explicitly rejects this concept and considers it a non Jewish concept. The Rashash in the back of the gemara in Bava Metziah 107 brings an indication from that gemara against concept of gilgulim. (This does not mean other do not hold of the concept, in fact many Rishonim ,and even ...


2

Rav Elchonon Wasserman in Kovetz Shiurim chelek beis os 28 says that the wife of Eliyahu Hanavi was not allowed to marry because he did not go through "death" even though he was no longer alive in the normal sense. So at least according to Rav Elchonon there is some kind of marital connection that transcends this world. To clarify: R' Elchonon proves from ...


2

the Pas Lechem commentary to Shaar Bechina ch.3 of Chovos Halevavos Chovos Halevavos: "It is proper that you should know that the whole world is synthesized of the physical and the spiritual, so intimately mixed and fused, that each of them sustains the other, like body and soul in living creatures. " Pas Lechem commentary: Likewise, the [...


2

The Ramban on Vayikra 18:29 discusses three types of Kares. One is dying young, but retaining a portion in the world to come - both the spiritual world and the ultimate world of the Resurrection. The second is living a longer life, but losing the world of souls after death, but still retaining a portion in the Resurrection. (The Ramban - pace the Rambam - ...


2

It comes from Avigail and is the opposite of כף הקלע. The Pasuk in Shmuel says וְֽהָיְתָה֩ נֶ֨פֶשׁ אֲדֹנִ֜י צְרוּרָ֣ה ׀ בִּצְר֣וֹר הַחַיִּ֗ים אֵ֚ת ה' אלקיך וְאֵ֨ת נֶ֤פֶשׁ אֹיְבֶ֙יךָ֙ יְקַלְּעֶ֔נָּה בְּת֖וֹךְ כַּ֥ף הַקָּֽלַע׃ This juxtaposition makes it look like it is referring to rest as opposed to being flung about. Tzror would mean a bond, held ...


2

Radak citing Yonatan, Ralbag, and Metzudot David (Samuel 1:25:29) all interpret it as a reference to meriting Olam HaBa. (It seems to me that even those who read the verse there in accordance with its straightforward meaning would agree that the intended reference on tombstones is to this Drash.)


2

See here for a discussion in the talmud where hints to resurrection of the dead are found in the Torah. http://www.come-and-hear.com/sanhedrin/sanhedrin_90.html#PARTb The mishna on the folio beforehand stated that a belief in the resurrection is not enough, one must believe it is 'from the Torah'. Rashi seems to take this statement very literally. Rambam ...


2

It seems you're alluding to the discussion on this answer and the comments there. The Midrash quotes in Fred's comment there explains that fathers would place their children in fires as offerings for the idol Molech, and the children's screams would reverberate from the fire (shekolo shel tinok nohem min ha'eish). Alternatively, the priests would chant ...


2

The Talmud (Sanhedrin 105a) understands from Psalms 9:18 "Return...to the depths [of Hell] all the nations that forget God" that only the wicked among the nations descend there, while all other non-Jews are rewarded in the afterlife.


2

R. Hai Gaon has a respnsum about how the actions of the living can impact the dead. While he first notes the possibility that certain things can be done to relieve the punishment of the dead, he concludes the responsum by asserting that there is absolutely nothing anyone can do to increase the dead's merit and earn him more reward. The dead's level and the ...


2

The Yerushalmi's version of that story has it that he saved him while Rabbi Meir was still alive. When onlookers asked him if Heaven will really listen to him, he answered: אמר לון ולא כן תנינן מצילין תיק הספר עם הספר תיק תפילין עם התפילין מצילין לאלישע אחר בזכות תורתו One is allowed to save a Torah cover (on Shabbos) while saving the scroll, one is ...


2

Rambam appears to offer a metaphorical interpretation of this statement: Introduction to Commentary to Mishnah ואמרו כל המלעיג על דברי חכמים נידון בצואה רותחת ואין לך צואה רותחת גדולה מן הכסילות אשר השיאתו להלעיג And they said "whoever mocks the words of the Sages is judged in boiling excrement", and there is no greater boiling excrement than ...


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