New answers tagged

1

We can draw a fundamental distinction between the case of Abraham obeying God and the general concept of "the Torah is not in heaven". The latter means that God enshrined certain laws in the Torah, and those laws cannot be changed – even based on Divine communication. However, when God commands you to do something against the Torah, He is not changing any ...


-1

Unfortunately, I cannot answer the second part of your question, but I will attempt to answer the first. Regarding Abraham and the binding of Isaac, child sacrifice was the norm in ancient pagan culture.[1] People felt this was a good way to show of G-d. For example, there is a possible link to Greek myth, though I am convinced it was independently derived ...


0

This is answered directly by G-d to Moshe. It appears in parshat V'Era (Shemot 6:2-3) which says: וַיְדַבֵּ֥ר אֱלֹהִ֖ים אֶל־מֹשֶׁ֑ה וַיֹּ֥אמֶר אֵלָ֖יו אֲנִ֥י יְהוָֽה׃ ג וָאֵרָ֗א אֶל־אַבְרָהָ֛ם אֶל־יִצְחָ֥ק וְאֶֽל־יַעֲקֹ֖ב בְּאֵ֣ל שַׁדָּ֑י וּשְׁמִ֣י יְהוָ֔ה לֹ֥א נוֹדַ֖עְתִּי לָהֶֽם׃ Both the angels and the appearance of G-d were not material, physical ...


1

Rashi explains that because it was a nevua, he did not have to physically see the stars in the sky. Indeed, if he had seen the stars in the sky, then it would have been impossible to see the stars that were below the horizon. Pasuk Lech Lecha 15:5 And He took him outside, and He said, "Please look heavenward and count the stars, if you are able to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included