Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 8775

Generally refers to Avraham (Abraham), Yitzchak (Isaac), and Yaakov (Jacob); the three patriarchs of the Jewish People.

-1
votes
The answer as far as I can tell, is that no -- Avraham is not called 'Av HaAm' in any classical Jewish sources. Source: This term is not found in the rather comprehensive Bar Ilan Responsa database i …
answered Apr 30 '17 by mevaqesh
3
votes
As noted in the comments in @Danno's link, there is no source for interpreting the Midrash as referring to nations as opposed to Yaakov and Esav themselves in any early Jewish literature. Furthermore …
answered Oct 13 '15 by mevaqesh
2
votes
Malbim asks this question in his commentary to 31:45. He suggests that this was a two-part pact between Lavan and Ya'akov. They were treat each other properly both publicly and privately. The former c …
answered Jan 11 '18 by mevaqesh
0
votes
It is present in the Sheilat ed. of Rambam's responsa (p. 673 IIRC), but R. Sheilat demonstrates that this responsum is probably a forgery. See, however, Tzvi Langerman's piece in which he argues for …
answered Apr 24 '15 by mevaqesh
4
votes
The Shem MiShmuel (Parashat Vayetse) writes that Yaakov was originally meant to serve God through the mode of assei tov, and Esav was supposed to serve God through the mode of sur mera: עקב ועשו ו …
answered Dec 28 '17 by mevaqesh
6
votes
For a long time there have been Jews who have indeed beseeched the dead. However, numerous sources state this is is prohibited Some state that it is permitted if the request is not directly from the d …
answered Mar 26 '17 by mevaqesh
2
votes
Radak (there) explains that besides for taking advantage of his hunger to get the birthright, he was now, once again acting with trickery: את בכורתי לקח - בנזיד עדשים, כשמצאוני רעב, ואין לך מרמה ג …
answered Nov 21 '17 by mevaqesh
5
votes
Interestingly, although widely quoted, a cursory search shows me only 16th century sources for this exact wording, although they quote "Chazal". E.g. R. Isaiah Horowitz in Shelah to Parshat Vayishlac …
answered Oct 8 '15 by mevaqesh
1
vote
This question is asked by the Toras Hamincha (a student of the Rashba) in his drashos (Lech L'cha drasha 8). Another student of the Rashba R. Yehoshua ibn Shu'aib writes that many have asked this ques …
answered Feb 12 '15 by mevaqesh
2
votes
R. Avraham Ben HaRambam cites the verse "do not touch my anointed and do not harm my prophets" (Psalms 105:15) in the context of negative assessments of members of these categories. This would certain …
answered Feb 11 '15 by mevaqesh
1
vote
The following is not profound but it is the simplest answer to a simple question, that does not seem to have been clearly explicated: Abraham could serve them whatever he wanted (except for a limb to …
answered Jan 10 '16 by mevaqesh
1
vote
The next verse (26:3) states that the reason was that God would bless him and give the land of Canaan to Yitshak and his descendants. Rashi to Genesis (26:2) states that Yitshak was not supposed to l …
answered Nov 15 '17 by mevaqesh
5
votes
The verses strongly indicate that not only did Avraham not give a double portion to Yishmael, he gave (basically) everything to Yitshak. For example, right before stating that Avraham died, Genesis ( …
answered Sep 3 '17 by mevaqesh
6
votes
Ohr HaYashar to Hilkhot Mamrim (6:3) points this out, but doesn't seem to answer. Daf Al Hadaf to Pesahim (56a) quotes several answers: the Sefer Merafsin Igra (page 233) is cited as suggesting that …
answered Dec 25 '17 by mevaqesh
8
votes
The Pirkei D'Rabbi Eliezer does indeed state that Esav killed Nimrod (ed. Higger ch. 31). This is also found in Yalkut Shimoni (Parashat Tol'dot 110) and Targum Pseudo-Jonathan (Parashat Tol'dot 25:27 …
answered Oct 29 '17 by mevaqesh

15 30 50 per page