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Questions about the purpose, meaning, halachos (rules), etc. of names.

7
votes
Probably for the same reason you won't find too many Velvels and Berels in Yemen, or Saadias and Rahamims in New Square.
answered Oct 6 '10 by Dave
6
votes
According to Wikipedia, it derives from the Babylonian word for "set time," or from the Assyrian word meaning [apparently] "heat of the sun." But the name in use nowadays is certainly just taken from …
answered Nov 28 '11 by Dave
3
votes
ציון לנפש חיה The abbreviation also has the connotation of "success" (צלח is the imperative form of הצלחה.) I'm not sure whether that meaning was intended, though.
answered Apr 13 '11 by Dave
12
votes
Some claim it is a variant of the Greek word Phoebos, meaning "bright," which is why it goes together with Shraga (= flame in Aramaic). However, others dispute this etymology. Here is one interesting …
answered May 22 '11 by Dave
4
votes
Your best bet is probably Otzar Hachochma. Their online version is here (click on the rightmost link to enter as a guest). There is a search box on the top, in which you can search for terms like קעזמ …
answered Jan 2 '12 by Dave
3
votes
It's also okay to have a posuk that actually contains the person's name. So why not, for example, Tehillim 56:9: נֹדִי, סָפַרְתָּה-אָתָּה: שִׂימָה דִמְעָתִי בְנֹאדֶךָ; הֲלֹא, בְּסִפְרָתֶךָ. [I kno …
answered Sep 13 '11 by Dave
8
votes
Off the cuff, I can say that this was done for at least 2000 years. Rabban Gamliel the Elder, who lived at the end of the Second Temple era, was succeeded by his son Rabi Shimon [ben Gamliel], who was …
answered Jun 17 '12 by Dave
9
votes
Leib is the Yiddish word for lion (aryeh).
answered Jul 25 '11 by Dave
13
votes
Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]
answered Oct 22 '12 by Dave
3
votes
It is said that there are no 3 consecutive pages that do not contain a mention of Abaye or Rava. I heard that many years ago, one of the first companies to make a computer search program on Gemara "pr …
answered Nov 30 '10 by Dave
6
votes
"Ha-isha" (האשה) is a title of respect that has the advantage of sounding perfectly natural.
answered May 8 '11 by Dave