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Questions pertaining to the Hebrew language, as related to Judaism. See the help center: http://judaism.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic

6
votes
I think you hit the nail on the head.
answered Aug 19 '10 by Dave
5
votes
Torah Lishmah is an interesting and atypical sefer to begin with. It was written by the Ben Ish Chai under the pseudonym Yechezkel Kachali (note that the gematria of Yechezkel = Yosef and the gematria …
answered May 31 '11 by Dave
4
votes
Orchos Tzadikkim, at the end of Shaar Hashtika, has a quite extensive explanation about the various types of Leitzanus. See here.
answered Oct 25 '10 by Dave
9
votes
Leib is the Yiddish word for lion (aryeh).
answered Jul 25 '11 by Dave
7
votes
Radak cites an explanation that it's a contraction of על שתי, the number that is "on top of" two, i.e. one. However, he rejects this interpretation (as does Ibn Ezra, cited in msh210's answer). I have …
answered Jul 18 '11 by Dave
7
votes
Rashi in Pesachim 39a says that shaluk is extensively cooked, and Tosafos there 39b agrees. That's pretty much the standard pshat. However, Ran in Nedarim 49a translates it there as undercooked.
answered Sep 14 '11 by Dave
6
votes
"Ha-isha" (האשה) is a title of respect that has the advantage of sounding perfectly natural.
answered May 8 '11 by Dave
5
votes
I don't know Hungarian or Polish, but it would seem reasonable to guess that it is a Yiddishized version of the English phrase "to show." The pure Yiddish term for this would be באוויזן (ba'veizen). M …
answered Jan 10 '11 by Dave
5
votes
Maybe because "Pessach" sounds too much like פתח (doorway or opening)?
answered Mar 25 '11 by Dave
8
votes
The definitive work on this topic is Frumspeak, by Chaim Weiser. You might also find the Wikipedia entry on Yeshivish to be enlightening, and perhaps humorous too!
answered Jun 14 '10 by Dave