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Results tagged with Search options user 641

The seventh day of the week and a day of rest. Also use this tag for questions that apply equally to Yom Tov and Shabbat.

3
votes
While you may not start or enhance the cooking process on Shabbat, you are allowed to leave a dish to cook if the cooking process started before Shabbat began. You would put the food into a low oven … or slow-cooker before the start of Shabbat and take it out the next day when you want to eat it. You may not interfere with the food until you take it out and you may neither adjust nor turn off the …
answered Dec 6 '13 by Michael Sandler
12
votes
5answers
What melachah is transgressed by folding a tallis? Is there some way to fold it which is permitted?
asked Nov 17 '11 by Michael Sandler
4
votes
1answer
Is there anything wrong with using an ice-cream scoop to dish ice-cream on Shabbat? I have been told in the name of a Rebbetzin that you can't. …
asked Jun 25 '12 by Michael Sandler
1
vote
My understanding is that folding is considered tikkun kli which is a toldah of makkeh b'patish, because by folding on the folds you are sharpening the creases. To me this would apply where you want t …
answered Nov 17 '11 by Michael Sandler
7
votes
I read (I don't remember where) that an aerosol does not trangress the melachah of winnowing, but an atomizer does. An aerosol keeps its content under pressure, and pressing the nozzle simply unblock …
answered Dec 28 '11 by Michael Sandler
11
votes
The laws of Shabbat apply only to Jews, so someone who isn't Jewish is doing no wrong whatsoever when they watch TV on Friday night. For Jews, as pointed out in the comments, there is a difference … by G-d as communicated to Moses in the Torah. While there is no question that switching an electrical current on or off on Shabbat is forbidden, what exactly is wrong with it is the subject of …
answered Aug 16 '12 by Michael Sandler