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Questions about the purpose, meaning, halachos (rules), etc. of names.

8
votes
I'm not sure what you have against the verse in the Artscroll. But here are the 9 possibilities: Breishit 19:4: טֶרֶם יִשְׁכָּבוּ וְאַנְשֵׁי הָעִיר אַנְשֵׁי סְדֹם נָסַבּוּ עַל הַבַּיִת מִנַּעַר ו …
answered May 11 '14 by Danny Schoemann
9
votes
In Ashkenaz (Germany-France) there was a ceremony called Chol Kreish which was for giving a baby its non-Jewish name. So it can't be horribly wrong. As an aside, the Jewish and secular names did …
answered May 16 '11 by Danny Schoemann
1
vote
In the shul I grew up in - Adas Yeshurun of Johannesburg - before Krias HaTorah the Gabbai would give somebody a card with ששי written on it. For the 6th Aliya the Gabbai (or Ba'al Segen, actually) …
answered Jun 8 '14 by Danny Schoemann
2
votes
, most of the people I grew up with had mismatching Hebrew-English names. There's some chatting about this phenomena here. …
answered Dec 9 '12 by Danny Schoemann
5
votes
Apparently, it's a long-standing tradition handed down orally that the Roman soldier who raped Mary was called Panderik. So I've been told. Caveat Emptor. Yoshke is a diminutive of J. For an online …
answered May 22 '17 by Danny Schoemann
6
votes
One of the senior Rabbis in Israel - Rav Chaim Kanievsky (son of the famous Steipler Gaon) - occasionally changes people's names. This is often done when their Biblical names come from wicked people … multiple names. For example Moses - as mention on Wikipedia: Moses' other names were: Jekuthiel (by his mother), Heber (by his father), Jered (by Miriam), Avi Zanoah (by Aaron), Avi Gedor (by …
answered Mar 6 '14 by Danny Schoemann
3
votes
The Medrash Lekach Tov explains that by naming both הֵגַי and שַׁעֲשְׁגַז it highlights the fact that there were 2 seperate"harems". הֵגַי was in charge of those getting ready to meet the king, and …
answered Feb 5 by Danny Schoemann
4
votes
A possible candidate would be the Amora אביי - whose real name was נחמני but was called אביי by the acronym for אֲשֶׁר-בְּךָ יְרֻחַם יָתוֹם. Read more details here. Unless you want to argue it was A …
answered Apr 9 '13 by Danny Schoemann
1
vote
The Yud in the Heh - ה In Hilchot Safrus we consider the ה to be made up of a ד and an upside down י In סימן לב - סדר כתיבת התפלין sometimes it's called the inside leg of the Heh other times it's ca …
answered Oct 14 '15 by Danny Schoemann
2
votes
According to our Maggid Shiur, the Talmud Yerushalmi claims that Ben Drosai sinned by worshiping idols. In order to repent, he decided to start stealing from Avoda Zara; thus becoming a "hero" of a t …
answered Nov 20 '12 by Danny Schoemann
1
vote
A guess: In Ch. 10 verse 3 Daniel says לֶחֶם חֲמֻדוֹת לֹא אָכַלְתִּי - that during the 3 years he fasted, he didn't eat clean bread. He refers to this bread as לֶחֶם חֲמֻדוֹת Maybe that's why he …
answered Apr 12 '18 by Danny Schoemann
7
votes
According to this page on Dafi-Yomi.com, it's Rabbi Chanina ben Hama, a student of Rebbi Yehuda haNasi. רבי חנינא "סתם" הוא רבי חנינא בר חמא , היה תלמידו של רבי יהודה הנשיא‏ Other sources: O …
answered Aug 16 '15 by Danny Schoemann
3
votes
Maybe it's to highlight the fact that he added an extra Parsha (Shmos 18:21) into the Torah, as Rashi informs us: יֶתֶר, עַל שֵׁם שֶׁיִּתֵּר פָּרָשָׁה אַחַת בַּתּוֹרָה "וְאַתָּה תֶחֱזֶה" ‏
answered May 6 by Danny Schoemann
1
vote
Your question is not 100% clear. Nowhere is Moses referred to as the son of Gcd. Moses was a regular human being and his genealogy is clearly recorded (Exodus 6:20 for example). Your single referenc …
answered Jan 18 '15 by Danny Schoemann
4
votes
An androgynous is mostly treated [visibly] like a male in Halacha, despite the "dual/uncertain" Halachic status. Mila: An androgynous get a Brit Mila (Rambam Mila Ch. 1:7). Though without a Bracha. …
answered Jun 2 '14 by Danny Schoemann

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