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Questions pertaining to the Hebrew language, as related to Judaism. See the help center: http://judaism.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic

3
votes
If you have a lot of items that you need transliterated / translated, you are unlikely to be able to harness the folks at Mi Yodea. You can try Amazon Mechanical Turk, make a task of transliterating, and paying a small amount of money to get Hebrew speakers to do this for you. …
answered Jun 21 by josh waxman
5
votes
It is the plural of respect. Think of Shalom Aleichem, which you say to an individual. I will (now) add that this is a common feature of many languages. While not true for Biblical Hebrew (though … social superiors (including elders); unfamiliar people perceived to be of similar or lower social standing to the speaker are addressed with the T term inta. Regarding Hebrew, they have this: In …
answered Jan 7 by josh waxman
2
votes
Monica's answer (and the supporting comments) is probably the correct one. I would just add that, otherwise, "fronting" a constituent is a means of emphasis. Biblical Hebrew is usually VSO (which … the subject (ani) first, then the purpose would be to emphasize the gratitude. See here, in Modality and the Biblical Hebrew Infinitive Absolute. …
answered Oct 8 '18 by josh waxman
5
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It means thank you. Here is a transliterated hebrew dictionary of sorts, such that you can write a word by typing English letters and get a translation. http://www.doitinhebrew.com/Translate/default.aspx?kb=IL+Hebrew+Phonetic#.UtkkCH-9KSM …
answered Jan 17 '14 by josh waxman
0
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The premise of this question is flawed. You state: If one does not pronounce the Shema correctly, one has not fulfilled their obligation (שולחן ערוך או"ח סימן סב). However, if one actually looks …
answered Jan 12 '17 by josh waxman
8
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It is Hebrew. דתנן ר' יהודה אומר הוי זהיר בתלמוד ששגגת תלמוד עולה זדון. Note that this is a Mishna, and ש to mean 'that/for', instead of ד. You can look up the word in Jastrow. http://www.tyndalearchive.com/TABS/Jastrow/index.htm Other words on the same pattern: targum; tafnuk (delicacy). …
answered Jun 2 '11 by josh waxman
5
votes
חלילה is a Biblical Hebrew word meaning outside, foreign, profane. (Compare to חולין.) It can be, therefore, used as a sort of interjection, that it should be foreign, profane, to take such an action … Hebrew and Aramaic word which means mercy, to spare something. For instance, in the Tosefta, שחס המקום עליו. Or in Yerushalmi, חס הוא אדם על כבוד אלמנתו. Jastrow lists it as both Hebrew and Chaldean …
answered Oct 4 '11 by josh waxman
4
votes
Name origin: Hebrew: ירדן (yardén, descender) < ירד (yarad, to descend) via: Klein, Ernest, A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language for Readers of English, The University …
answered Jun 16 '11 by josh waxman
8
votes
Ibn Ezra was not aware of the evidence from the Akkadian language, and therefore suggests what he suggests from a mixture of partial textual evidence and sevara. As I discuss in this parshablog post …
answered Jul 19 '11 by josh waxman
2
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My sense in this was always: עמל connotes a struggle. for instance, ואת עמלינו. It is something that requires effort. עוסק has the connotation of engaging in something, learning it deeply and being …
answered Jun 2 '11 by josh waxman
8
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The letters בגד כפת have two versions, one with Dagesh and one without. It gets a Dagesh after a closed syllable, or in the beginning of a word. In this instance, the previous word ends with an open …
answered Dec 31 '13 by josh waxman
-1
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This is an example of a chumra leading to a kula. As the question asks, What pronunciation should the Kohen give to each letter, if he wants to be strict in Halacha? If you look in Shulchan Aru …
answered Oct 30 '18 by josh waxman
10
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As avi answered, (1) Lach is an acceptable form for males in Biblical Hebrew. I think that one will typically find this in more polite speech. More than that, (3). It is an alternation in Biblical … Hebrew for the pausal form. Just as Lemech becomes Lamech at an etnachta or silluq (or sof pasuk), so does Lecha become Lach in these positions. Prayer is based, often, on Biblical Hebrew, and indeed …
answered Oct 26 '11 by josh waxman
3
votes
Megillat Esther is from Ketuvim, which means written with Divine Inspiration, rather than with nevuah as dictation from Hashem. Even within Neviim, different neviim express themselves differently. If …
answered Feb 28 '11 by josh waxman
2
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It is unclear what the ה in this pasuk means. (I've discussed it here.) The heh is not only enlarged but separated by whitespace. If you look at Onkelos on that pasuk, he considers it its own single …
answered Dec 25 '16 by josh waxman

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