Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Questions about translation in general, or about translation of specific words in Jewish texts.

9
votes
. "לַכֹּל זְמָן"), or describe an entity's state of being/action (e.g. "אַף אֲנִי בַּחֲלוֹמִי"). The sense of "against" in the translation is the prepositional sense, a gloss of the preposition "-ב …
answered Jun 15 '11 by WAF
16
votes
It is prescribed in שער הכוונות (Sha'ar Hakavanos, published in the sixteenth century) in the 7th paragraph here) to announce it loudly upon arriving home on Friday night for the reasons mentioned by …
answered Mar 4 '11 by WAF
5
votes
The first: Bless God, the blessed [one] Here "barchu" is imperative. The second: You are blessed, God. Here, "baruch" is beinoni pa'ul - a type of verb that is so passive and descript …
answered Dec 27 '11 by WAF
5
votes
tense for that reason. The floods lift up their fall2 This is a prediction or a promise, so the verb is imperfective and it is rendered in a future or present tense in translation. Rav Hirsch … there once, i.e. it could be read "you came tapping at my chamber door" without changing the meaning. 2This is the translation of Rav Hirsch. …
answered Oct 16 by WAF