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The (usually flat and cracker-like) bread that it's (usually) a mitzvah to eat on Pesach.

3
votes
Don't use normal flour. It can be bleached and enriched, which means it might already be chametz. Long ago people had wood-fired ovens. If you knew what you were doing with a good wood-fired oven, yo …
answered Mar 30 '15 by Shalom
1
vote
Normal matza is "watched completely from grinding to baking" -- yes, at the baking stage it's matza, at the grinding stage it's "flour." So we refer to extra-shmurah as "matza that was watched complet …
answered Jul 1 '15 by Shalom
3
votes
Osem makes non-shmurah matza in both whole-wheat-with-added-wheat-bran, as well as whole-wheat-and-rye. Both are higher in fiber than plain whole wheat.
answered Mar 18 '15 by Shalom
16
votes
Rakusen's of England makes cracker-sized machine "tea matzas", and they're round! (Mind you, you'd have to eat a few of those "crackers" to have a complete serving of matza for the mitzva.) The only i …
answered Feb 17 '12 by Shalom
2
votes
There are other distinctions, but the biggest one is that a Torah must be written "lishmah" -- with intent. Matza actually doesn't have to be "made" lishma, but must be "guarded" lishmah. If I stand w …
answered Nov 5 '14 by Shalom
10
votes
From the Star-K: Matzos left over from previous years that were stored in places free of chometz may be used. TIP: If your oven has been kashered for Pesach, simply put them in the oven for a few …
answered Mar 9 '15 by Shalom
3
votes
matza. For the seders, "shmurah matzah." If your ancestral customs are German, or if you have a connection with the old-time Jews of Jerusalem, get machine shmurah matzah. If you're Hassidic, get … hand-made shmurah matzah. (To the very best of my knowledge, all commercially available hand-made matza happens to be shmurah anyhow.) If you're anything else, ask your local rabbi what's preferable …
answered Mar 19 '10 by Shalom
14
votes
This custom is known as gebrochts (Yiddish for "broken"); or "matza shruya" (soaked matza) in modern Hebrew. It's prevalent in many Hassidic and Hassidically-influenced communities, though many first …
answered May 11 '11 by Shalom
2
votes
Hm. As I understand it, the reason Ashkenazim don't eat matza-made-with-fruit-juice is to respect a minority opinion in Tosfos, that it would create a certain form of chametz. But if someone is ill, w …
answered Apr 24 '13 by Shalom
7
votes
The Halacha is fairly clear about how to treat various categories of grain product: Bread Grain products that aren't at all bread (e.g. pasta) Quasi-bread not usually treated as bread What's far …
answered Apr 13 '10 by Shalom
1
vote
This text was written when the Temple stood and people were eating sacrifices. In fact, all sacrificial bread (other than a few from the Thanksgiving offering) were non-leavened, year-round. Furthermo …
answered Apr 7 '14 by Shalom
10
votes
Good question. The same question comes up with all the blessings regarding a second-day yom tov on the Diaspora; e.g. kiddush and shehechiyanu on the second night of Sukkot, Shavuot, and Shmini Atzere …
answered May 11 '11 by Shalom