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About the history and origins of words.

3
votes
You might want to check out The Word: The Dictionary That Reveals The Hebrew Source of English, by Isaac Mozeson (whose name I seem to have no trouble recalling, for some reason). I have heard this work criticized as consisting at least in part of folk etymology, so caveat emptor. …
answered Feb 12 '10 by Isaac Moses
5
votes
R' Hirsch on Gen. 7:14 had a similar conjecture: The derivation of צפור is obscure. It is to be found in צפורן, nail, and in צפיר, synonymous with שעיר the hairy one, the goat. So that צפור could …
answered May 22 '11 by Isaac Moses
3
votes
R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on Deuteronomy 31:2, calls "לצאת ולבוא" "the general term used for the public efficient activity of national leadership," and points us to his full workup o …
answered Oct 5 '16 by Isaac Moses
5
votes
R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on these two verses and on Genesis 2:5, says that "שיח," in both contexts, refers to "growth." In 21:15, R' Hirsch interprets "תַּחַת אַחַד הַשִּׂיחִם" as, …
answered Nov 6 '15 by Isaac Moses
12
votes
According to Merriam-Webster: Etymology: Yiddish yarmlke, from Polish jarmułka & Ukrainian yarmulka skullcap, of Turkic origin; akin to Turkish yağmurluk rainwear …
answered Apr 12 '10 by Isaac Moses