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wedding ceremony (and reception etc.)

11
votes
someone close to the bride or groom what to expect in this regard. (This one applies only if you read Hebrew and the wedding is of Chabad-Lubavitch folks.) Chabad-Lubavitch invitations in the United States … elaborate or large wedding cake. However, you may possibly see slices of bread handed around, either near the start of the meal or soon after the first dance after the bride and groom join the meal; feel free to take or decline a slice without showing any offense. …
answered Apr 28 '16 by msh210
4
votes
A chupa is not always a talis: other cloths are used also. But we do find that something used for one mitzva should be used for another (e.g. Nit'e Gavriel, Arbaas Haminim, chapter 61, paragraph 2), w …
answered Dec 17 '13 by msh210
5
votes
He didn't say anyone walked with the queen on one arm and a hat in the opposite hand at a wedding. He said doing so reminded him of a wedding. I suspect he was referring to walking with the bride on one arm and a candle in the opposite hand, to the chupa, a common custom. …
answered Feb 19 '14 by msh210
2
votes
It's not considered a sacrilege to paint a picture of the chupa in one's future wedding. Nor to paint the wedding scene without the chupa. Source: I've been around a little and have never heard of such a thing; and Nit'e Gavriel and Taame Haminhagim don't mention it AFAICT. …
answered Apr 18 '13 by msh210
3
votes
Nit'e Gavriel (Avelus 16:15) says: One can be lenient and join the simcha of his rebbe, including of the rebbe's descendants, provided the conditions of paragraph 9 are met. Those conditions are …
answered May 22 '13 by msh210
10
votes
Jewish Action, Summer 2005 edition, has a "What's the truth about..." column by Rabbi Dr. Ari Z. Zivotofsky on not meeting for the week preceding the wedding. His main point is the lack of old …
answered Jan 21 '13 by msh210
5
votes
Nit'e Gavriel: Shiduchim Us'naim has a whole chapter devoted to the breaking of the receptacle. Selected excerpts: 1. We break a receptacle immediately after reading the t'naim (deal)[1]… [1] …
answered Aug 2 '12 by msh210
6
votes
Nit'e Gavriel, Nisuin 1, chapter 37, is about the Yichud room and he mentions no prohibition on kissing that I see.
answered Feb 15 '15 by msh210
6
votes
Nit'e Gavriel, Nisuin 6:7 says that he doesn't fast the day after Yom Kipur, as his sins are already forgiven. (In 5:1, forgiveness of sins is one of the reasons given for his fasting.) See there for …
answered Jul 21 '11 by msh210
4
votes
In 1937 or so, my paternal grandparents went on singles-mixer boat rides, and met one another at a singles-mixer weekend in the Pine View Hotel in Fallsburg, New York, which events were hosted by Zeir …
answered Dec 1 '11 by msh210
3
votes
I have heard it comes from the mishna (Bikurim) that says people in Jerusalem would stand and greet people bringing bikurim, on which the g'mara (Kidushin) says chaviva mitzva b'sha'tah, a mitzva at i …
answered Jun 22 '12 by msh210
1
vote
from votes on it). m'sader kidushin, the (usually) rabbi who runs all the halachically relevant aspects of the wedding and says the kidushin blessing witnesses to kidushin to nisuin (yichud, and in …
answered Nov 13 '16 by msh210
1
vote
I suspect (but have no source for claiming) that it may be an application of one of these traditions, cited in Nit'e Gavriel (Nisuin volume 1): When the groom is beneath the wedding canopy is an es … ratzon, time of willingness, when God grants his prayers. (Chapter 18, footnote 13.) It was customary that, during the wedding meal, the master of ceremonies would recite a "mi sheberach" prayer, asking for God's blessings upon all those present. (Chapter 39, paragraph 21.) …
answered Mar 20 '14 by msh210
7
votes
Someone in the neighborhood I used to live in got an aliya for his 83rd birthday (=70+13), and people threw bags. The kids who opened them were disappointed to find dried prunes.
answered Feb 8 '11 by msh210
10
votes
Jewish Action, Summer 2005 edition, has a "What's the truth about..." column by Rabbi Dr. Ari Z. Zivotofsky on not meeting for the week preceding the wedding. His main point is the lack of old …
answered Jul 17 '12 by msh210

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