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Books about or of Judaism

2
votes
Seemingly not. The Hebrew and English Wikipedia articles say that תורה קוואל and its translation מעינה של תורה cover the parashiyos and haftaros, implying that those are the only sections. Those are …
answered Sep 7 '14 by msh210
11
votes
Wikipedia has an extensive list of the Torah database software programs currently available. Any PDF (e.g. from HebrewBooks.org) opened in Safari on the iPhone can be saved to the program iBooks and …
answered Oct 24 '13 by msh210
19
votes
My understanding (no source) is that, yes, twentieth-century rabbis kept copies. It wasn't necessary to type twice: they used carbon paper. I don't know about older rabbis, though. Update: However, s …
answered Dec 23 '11 by msh210
18
votes
There's no sin in translating Jewish texts (nowadays, at least). I have no source for saying so, but there's evidence in the vast amount of Jewish literature that has been translated into various lang …
answered Oct 1 '15 by msh210
2
votes
The ArtScroll "Stone Edition" Pentateuch has spaces in it to record family members' yahrzeits. I've no doubt this is in order that purchasers might implement the custom you mention.
answered Dec 24 '14 by msh210
3
votes
It's in the libraries of the Hebrew University, Indiana University, the University of Chicago, the University of Toronto, the University of Florida, Yale University, and UCLA.
answered Dec 26 '11 by msh210
4
votes
Yes, at least for some non-Lubavitch, non-Breslov people. The proof is from the myriad great Torah scholars who cannot reasonably be described as Lubavitch or Breslov but who quote their books. As jus …
answered Nov 19 '15 by msh210
4
votes
The standard edition, out of copyright and republished by many publishers over the years, sounds like what you want. It's got Raavad, Kesef Mishne, Magid Mishne, Lechem Mishne, Hagahos Maymaniyos, an …
answered Apr 19 '18 by msh210
3
votes
Leviticus is available on hebrewbooks.org. (The listed date there, שנה/‎1595, is a mistake.)
answered Nov 4 '15 by msh210
3
votes
I can't recommend it (as I haven't read it), but Rabbi Nosson Slifkin wrote one.
answered Jun 1 '11 by msh210
3
votes
Minchas Shay is a commentary on Tanach that focuses on the correct reading (both k'siv and k'ri), including such things as paragraph breaks. (I don't know for certain that he comments on every sefer o …
answered Jul 30 '12 by msh210
1
vote
Does he have the most published seforim out of all gedolim? Many of 'his' books are (near-)transcriptions of what he said, in many cases not even corrected by him ("בלתי מוגה"). Since God taught …
answered May 8 '16 by msh210
10
votes
There some times where (according to kabala or something) one should have a certain vowelization of the name in mind (while still saying "Adonay" of course). You'll sometimes see the name with four tz …
answered Mar 27 '12 by msh210
10
votes
I was, for a while, unofficially in charge of my synagogue's library, and we had it organized as follows (as well as I can recall). The guiding principle was that things should be where people will lo …
answered Nov 6 '13 by msh210
0
votes
I want to learn Nach on a "Pashat Pashut" format. I don't want to read the Hebrew-English Nach, neither the "fancy" Meforshim that delve through all of the Devrei Torah on each Passuk. Sounds lik …
answered May 2 '16 by msh210

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