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About the history and origins of words.

8
votes
The following links may be of interest: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Jewish_surnames http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_surnames_from_German http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Categ …
answered Dec 26 '10 by msh210
2
votes
I'm guessing Yiddish shtibl is actually related to English stove, which may be from Vulgar Latin, whereas steeple is apparently from a Germanic root and completely unrelated.
answered Aug 31 '10 by msh210
6
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Aruch Hashulchan, Even Haezer 129, writes (in my own loose translation with uncertain translations marked with question marks in brackets [thus?]): [We spell the name] "יחיאל". And some are nickna …
answered Feb 14 '12 by msh210
1
vote
This is a guess. If an arched doorway has a correspondingly arched-topped door in it, then, as the door opens, each part of the door will move, in a head-on view, to the side, toward the hinges, so t …
answered Feb 14 '12 by msh210
2
votes
Balashon says "the theory that makes the most sense to me, and seems to be the most widely accepted," is that it comes from Latin divinus, which means "divine". See those two links for more info, the …
answered Oct 4 '11 by msh210
6
votes
…that Qayin derived from the 1st millenium BC South Arabic word Qyn, and that Cain is not a name old enough in Bible times of the 2nd millenium. Is it plausible that this is in fact a correct appro …
answered Dec 24 '14 by msh210
4
votes
I don't know. However, the Online Etymology Dictionary says English grapple is from Middle English grapple from Old French grapil, "hook", diminutive of Old French grape, "hook", from a Germanic … hook)", which seems to have multiple mistakes (if we believe the Online Etymology Dictionary), but may be correct in that Yiddish קרעפל is related to Germanic words meaning "hook". Note also German …
answered Mar 2 '11 by msh210
6
votes
Other answers have already noted that this comes from the Greek συνέδριον ("synedrion"). I'll add more detail: That word comes from the Greek σύνεδρος ("sitting together"), from σύν ("with", also fou …
answered Jan 25 '15 by msh210
7
votes
Etymonline gives it as from Russian латка, "pastry", which may have come eventually from Ancient Greek ἐλαία, "olive" (or maybe it means modern Greek ελαία, "olive". I'm not sure).
answered Jan 4 '13 by msh210