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The Rambam, or Maimonides, was a famous 12th century Rabbi, philosopher, and physician. He wrote the Mishneh Torah and the Moreh Nevuchim (Guide to the Perplexed).

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One solution is as follows. The Rambam believed that sacrifices would end, as he arguably implies in More Nivuchim. The Rambam also believed that Halocho has a process, as he goes through in … Hilchos Mamrim and the introduction to Seifer Hamitzvos. For the Rambam to say in the context of Halocho that the sacrifices will end, he has to assume that Halocho will be in another stage of the process …
answered Dec 24 '17 by Dov F
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It is permitted to enter a mosque. This is the ruling of R. Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer Vol. 7 YD 12) and it is based on the Rambam. …
answered Feb 17 '13 by Dov F
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We are fortunate that these great people recorded such personal moments, because it shows us that they were human, and they struggled with situations no less difficult than any of us. Lest anyone say …
answered Aug 9 '12 by Dov F
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principle. In this case, if we say the Rambam was referring only to Mashiach the person, it would seem that he refers to Mashiach ben David, since he ends off saying that included in this principle is the …
answered Sep 6 '12 by Dov F
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Rambam himself deals with these issues toward the end of Part One of the Guide. In 1:53 he writes (emphasis mine): Many of the attributes express different acts of God, but that difference does … subject to our comprehension, he would be that thing. The Torah simply "speaks the language of man" in this way, according to the Rambam. …
answered Nov 13 '12 by Dov F
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While you are correct that Islam is not heresy, that alone is not sufficient reason for a Jew to convert. There are many things which are not accepted by Judaism but are not considered so damaging as …
answered Feb 17 '13 by Dov F
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