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Questions about the purpose, meaning, halachos (rules), etc. of names.

9
votes
My local shul happens to have this Sefer. I borrowed it and scanned in the relevant pages dealing with R' Chaim Kanievsky's opinion on modern names. Here are the relevant pages from the book (page 50 … -51, and 168-171). My loose translation of some of the relevant parts: One should not give their children new, modern names, because they do not have any holiness, or bring blessings. Rather, he …
answered Apr 12 '13 by Michoel
3
votes
The segula that the name "Ben Tzion" is associated with long life is also brought by R' Rachamim Nissim Yitzchok Palagi in Yafeh La-Lev (Chelek Gimmel Y.D. Siman 265 Ois 7). He connects it with two Pe …
answered Sep 24 '12 by Michoel
12
votes
R. Mordechai Sasson, in his sefer דבר בעתו in the section called "רמזי מגלה", explains that Haman symbolizes the Yetzer Harah (evil inclination), and his ten sons allude to its ten bad character trait …
answered May 1 '13 by Michoel
11
votes
The Midrash (Bereishis Rabba 37:7) explains why in the times of Tanach, people would come up with "new" names based on events surrounding the birth, whereas nowadays we name people after the previous …
answered May 1 '13 by Michoel
6
votes
Rabbi Chaim Vital writes in Shaar Hamitzvos (Parshas Shemos) that the Arizal warned against pronouncing the names of angels aloud. He explains that this is because when the angel hears his name being …
answered Feb 8 '13 by Michoel
6
votes
The Nishmas Avraham (Chelek Hey Choshen Mishpat Siman 42) and Yalkut Yosef (Kibbud Av Va'em Perek Vov Sif Vov) (among others), rule that an adopted child is obligated in honoring his biological parent …
answered Sep 19 '12 by Michoel
12
votes
Sephardi Jews is a general term referring to the descendants of Spanish and Portuguese Jews who lived in the Iberian Peninsula before their expulsion in 1492 by the Alhambra Decree. It can also refer …
answered Sep 28 '12 by Michoel
3
votes
Chaim (Siman 22) explains why specifically the letter Aleph was changed to Hey: There is a law in Hilchos Gittin (EH 129:34) that names in Loshen Hakodesh are spelled with a Hey at the end, whereas … names in foreign languages are end in an Aleph. Therefore the wicked chaimberlain was named חרבונא, while Eliyahu Hanavi was called חרבונה. The Chida (Kisey Rachamim, Mesechtes Sofrim 14:6) brings from …
answered Feb 14 '13 by Michoel
4
votes
One of my favorite explanations (which I just found out actually comes from the Shiboley Haleket): The Rav customarily gives a Shabbos Hagadol Derosha, and for all the people listening it feels like a …
answered Mar 23 '13 by Michoel
5
votes
If they know the father's name they can say that instead (Yabia Omer 2:11). If they do not know the father's name either, the Nishmas Avraham (vol. 4 42:13) writes in the name of Rabbi Elyashuv that …
answered Feb 8 '13 by Michoel
8
votes
Rabbi Levi Yitzchok Shneerson explains this discrepancy Kabbalistically (Likkutey Levi Yitzchok (Pesukey Tanach Umamareh Chazal pg. 95, see Sefer Ha'erchin Chabad (Mareches Ha'osyos vol. 1 pg. 369)). …
answered Jan 24 '13 by Michoel
5
votes
The sefer "Viyikare Shemo Beyisroel" (page 84) brings two views on the subject. Some consider combining two names as a completely different name that has no association to either, while others have …
answered Dec 27 '12 by Michoel