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Questions pertaining to the Hebrew language, as related to Judaism. See the help center: http://judaism.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic

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It is used here to indicate divisons of opinion which get in the way of a national unity ("hearts" reflecting practice, belief and tradition). This use seems to reflect "discord" and this one takes i …
answered Nov 7 by rosends
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It is from Isaiah 11:1 1.And a shoot shall spring forth from the stem of Jesse, and a twig shall sprout from his roots. א.וְיָצָא חֹטֶר מִגֶּזַע יִשָׁי וְנֵצֶר מִשָּׁרָשָׁיו יִפְרֶה
answered Sep 7 '15 by rosends
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I can't explain the handwriting, but the words say "kodesh l'hashem" (Holy to God). There are 2 "boxes" which seem to be dividers though I'm not sure why there is one between the L and God's name (unl …
answered Feb 22 '16 by rosends
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The exact nature of what God blew into man is discussed by some of the commentators. The Sfrono writes G’d personally blew a soul of life into man, a life force which had been readied to absorb w …
answered Oct 6 by rosends
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Learning the torah is not as simple as learning to read Hebrew, or even learning the biblical grammar necessary. The torah was given within a context of a particular belief system and complemented by …
answered Sep 19 '12 by rosends
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/Melacha-A-Unique-Definition-of-Work.htm "The Hebrew language has two words for "work"--avodah and melachah. Avodah is a general term meaning work, while melachah has a very precise halachic …
answered May 3 '15 by rosends
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The only other way to translate would be "remember the day of rest..." as Shabbat is the title for the day that hashem "shavat" rested. Though there are myriad understandings for what it means to res …
answered Feb 18 '13 by rosends
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Exodus 1:13 uses a word sharing the ayin-vet-yod (e-v-d) root "So the Egyptians enslaved the children of Israel with back breaking labor." The phrase "back breaking labor" seems to point not to a si …
answered Jul 29 '14 by rosends
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According to the Sforno on 8:7, the pasuk says that they will be removed from the houses but not from the whole country; on the contrary, they will die in the land and cause a stench, but in the f …
answered Dec 27 '18 by rosends
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The phrases refer to the nullification of an unacceptable substance (the first, in a larger substance 60 times the amount, the second in general) intentionally. Often, the presence of a forbidden sub …
answered Aug 20 '14 by rosends
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same spiritual sense, but the text adds that it applies to those who were not physically there “with us”). But the word does more than that. Nitzavim is connected to the Hebrew concepts of matzeva, a …
answered Sep 5 '18 by rosends
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Linguistically, either there is no connection, or they are closely related, depending on which root you decide is being employed. Ernest Klein's Etymological Dictionary (page 654) has 2 separate words …
answered Nov 6 '15 by rosends