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As per the title, does one earn any reward/s'char for the attempt (or even just the intent) to perform a mitzvah?

This evening, we all piled out of shul to say Kiddush Levana only to find that the sky was too cloudy, but we were all ready and interested in doing the mitzvah. If it ends up that, because of the weather, we cannot perform the mitzvah this month, do we receive any reward for our intent or trying to perform it?

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Kiddushin 40a

מחשבה טובה מצרפה למעשה שנאמר אז נדברו יראי ה' איש אל רעהו ויקשב ה' וישמע ויכתב ספר זכרון לפניו ליראי ה' ולחושבי שמו מאי ולחושבי שמו אמר רב אסי אפילו חשב אדם לעשות מצוה ונאנס ולא עשאה מעלה עליו הכתוב כאילו עשאה

Good intention is combined with deed, for it is said: Then they that feared the Lord spoke one with another: and the Lord hearkened, and heard, and a book of remembrance was written before him, for them that feared the Lord, and that thought upon his name. Now, what is the meaning of ‘that thought upon his name’? — Said R. Assi: Even if one [merely] thinks of performing a precept but is forcibly prevented the Writ ascribes it to him as though he has performed it. (Soncino translation)

  • But one should still do it if the opportunity later presents itself... – chacham Nisan Dec 16 '18 at 18:33
  • I was taught that intention to perform a mitzvah is on its own not sufficient to earn reward, but that any actual action in the intended direction is (even if circumstances "forcibly prevent" the deed). For example, if I think when I wake up "I'm going to lain t'fillin today" but I don't do it, there is no credit for the thought. But if I take out the t'fillin and a wind comes and blows them away and I can't find another set, then I have done action and there is credit. I was also taught that for an avaira, the deed has to fully happen; intent and partial action is not enough be culpable. – Mark Fischler Dec 24 '18 at 8:19

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