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If I consider the Bris Milah unconscionable in the context of my own (someday) son, what are the alternatives?

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    Education? Then you'd realize that "unconscionable" is not based on good reasoning. – AviD Sep 2 '11 at 12:17
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    This question, at least in its present form, appears confrontational and asking for debate rather than an answer. – Isaac Moses Sep 2 '11 at 12:38
  • @AviD. You're assuming facts not in evidence, such as that Collin's objection is on medical grounds. It may be that Collin does not want to override his child's consent and right to self-determination. – TRiG Jul 14 '12 at 21:24
  • @TRiG you... are absolutely correct. I did make that assumption, not realizing I was assuming it. Reasonable assumption, but still, you are correct. – AviD Jul 19 '12 at 12:43
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From here:

from Soloveichik’s “How Not to Become a Jew” in the January issue of Commentary [online for subscribers of the print version only.] He cites Franz Rosenzweig, who is perhaps the most significant Jewish thinker of the twentieth century to Jews outside of the Orthodox pale.

There is only one community in which such a linked sequence of everlasting life unity without hearing deep within a voice that adds: “are eternal.” It must be a blood community, because only blood gives warrant to the hope for a future.

In other words, part of the notion of requiring bris (circumcision or some form of blood-letting) as an integral part of the conversion process is to emphasize that the convert becomes part of a blood relationship. He enters an extended family, not just a faith. He becomes connected to, and assumes responsibility for, all other Jews in horizontal and vertical temporal planes.

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